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Old 06-22-2015, 09:52 AM
 
556 posts, read 946,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Okey Dokie View Post
If it doesn't need venting, what happens to the dryer exhaust?
I have a non-venting dryer b/c there was no way to install dryer vents in my building when they did the renovation/retrofit (it's a 200 y/o building, originally commercial, now a 50 unit apartment building). Instead of venting, my dryer condenses the exhaust and drains through the same pipes as the washer drains through. The dryer also has the option to collect the condensed exhaust (i.e. water) in a tank similar to a dehumidifier, and manually pour the water down the drain after each cycle.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,229 posts, read 30,044,201 times
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I lived in a house in Spain that had one of these. It was in the kitchen under the counter. It did save space and it was convenient to put in a load of clothes and they are done when you come home. If I had an option, I would go with full size stackables. Here's why:

1) If the dryer breaks and can't be repaired, I can replace 1 appliance, not 2.
2) There are lots of times I don't want to dry everything I washed. Some stuff I want to hang damp and allow to air dry.
3) I need a machine that will handle large and small loads. Sometimes I do need to wash a big load of towels or a comforter. Most of the all in ones accommodate only small loads.
4) Dryers set in stains. Moving clothes from the washer to the dryer gives me a chance to see if the clothes/whatever is really clean.
5) It's expensive to just automatically dry everything you wash.
6) Those machines are not very common in the US. I would imagine a lot of repair people are not familiar with them.
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Old 06-22-2015, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Georgia
4,577 posts, read 5,669,252 times
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We had one when we lived in China one summer. Hated it. It cleaned ok, but the drying was a joke, and we ended up taking everything out and hanging it, anyway. Felt like a Chinese laundry . . . :-) But it did save space, which was at a premium there.
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Old 06-22-2015, 01:53 PM
 
2,957 posts, read 5,907,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddiehaskell View Post
I'm looking at buying an LG all-in-one washer/dryer (used $600-700), but some of the reviews have me wondering if I'd be better off with separate front loading units (stacked for space reasons). I like the fact that one unit takes up less space (could probably do shelving above it), doesn't need venting and doesn't require a 220v plug. However, I'm not sure if I could get used to a load of clothes taking 3-4 hours. Not having to unload the washer and load the dryer is a perk, but that's still a pretty long cycle. Does anyone have one of these units? How do you like it? Not a huge family doing laundry here...just two people.
No, but my washing machine takes about an hour to wash and 45 min to dry, so ~2 hours in total. 3-4 doesn't sound horrible at all. You could even use the timer feature to have it finish for a time when you can then fold/ put the clothes away.
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Old 06-22-2015, 03:16 PM
 
10,114 posts, read 19,414,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpheels View Post
I have a non-venting dryer b/c there was no way to install dryer vents in my building when they did the renovation/retrofit (it's a 200 y/o building, originally commercial, now a 50 unit apartment building). Instead of venting, my dryer condenses the exhaust and drains through the same pipes as the washer drains through. The dryer also has the option to collect the condensed exhaust (i.e. water) in a tank similar to a dehumidifier, and manually pour the water down the drain after each cycle.

So,

how does that figure into your sewer/wastewater bill?

Or is it just considered a percentage of your usage, like the rest of your water consumption?

Too complicated....

we are temporarily living in an apartment with such all-in-one w/d combination. We can run the dryer independent of the washer, but the dryer does a poor job of drying. Plus, its all electric, including electric hot water. Our electric bill here was almost as high as our former 2200 sq ft house

We've taken to washing everything except towels in cold water. Towels go in hot water, then double spin, then, we just hang to dry. We then put them in the dryer on air only to fluff them up or they're like cardboard! A basic PITA
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Old 06-22-2015, 03:35 PM
 
12,547 posts, read 9,943,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blazerj View Post
No, but my washing machine takes about an hour to wash and 45 min to dry, so ~2 hours in total. 3-4 doesn't sound horrible at all. You could even use the timer feature to have it finish for a time when you can then fold/ put the clothes away.
This was my thinking. After an hour or so of washing, I often forget about my clothes which means I end up having to do them over. It would be nice to have the dryer automatically kick in.
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Old 06-22-2015, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
3,683 posts, read 9,864,756 times
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Choosing to use a non-venting dryer when you're not forced to use one (like you live in a high-rise with no ability to vent) is completely insane.
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Old 06-22-2015, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Harbor Springs, Michigan
2,294 posts, read 3,431,422 times
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I vote for NO

You can't mix loads so a couple pairs of jeans and a couple of shirts or t-shirts ends up with crispy creased beyond recognition shirts and jeans with wet pockets. Had one for a while in a rented flat in the UK and hated it.

Oh and the dryer doesn't need a vent it doesn't 'blow' any air through the clothes they are just tumbled around in the heated drum and the water condenses and like others have said exits through the drain pipes.
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Old 06-23-2015, 05:36 AM
 
556 posts, read 946,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
So,

how does that figure into your sewer/wastewater bill?

Or is it just considered a percentage of your usage, like the rest of your water consumption?

Too complicated....

we are temporarily living in an apartment with such all-in-one w/d combination. We can run the dryer independent of the washer, but the dryer does a poor job of drying. Plus, its all electric, including electric hot water. Our electric bill here was almost as high as our former 2200 sq ft house

We've taken to washing everything except towels in cold water. Towels go in hot water, then double spin, then, we just hang to dry. We then put them in the dryer on air only to fluff them up or they're like cardboard! A basic PITA
Nothing to figure. You aren't creating water. You're just condensing water that you already paid for from the city. I've never seen sewer fees based on a separate sewer meter - always based on metered water usage, with the assumption that you are more or less draining/flushing the same amount of liquid as you pull from the fresh water system. With traditional washer/dryer sets, most of the water goes down the drain and a small fraction is evaporated and vented. With the condensing dryer, that small fraction goes down the drain instead. It's really pretty negligible in terms of the total volume of water drained/flushed over the course of a month.

My electric in this apartment is the lowest I've ever had, but that is largely because of the new renovation, so my HVAC is all new. Also, the building heat comes from a steam cogen network, so I only have to pay for the power needed to pump hot air, don't actually have to pay to generate the heat. Hot water comes from the steam cogen as well, so no hot water heater.
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Old 07-01-2015, 01:23 AM
 
12,547 posts, read 9,943,335 times
Reputation: 6927
Thanks for all the replies....they got me a little nervous about all-in-ones. Got a front load set on sale for about $1k last night.
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