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Old 08-01-2015, 06:07 PM
 
53 posts, read 47,820 times
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Do these broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom next the entrance from garage cause problem?

Can the adhesive be removed after the floor tiles be removed? What can be done after removal the adhesive and tiles? Concrete paint or something else?

There are furnace/AC/water heater in one of the room. The devices are installed on the bare concrete floor.
I do not want to reinstall them. The room next this room has the similar floor tiles which are in perfect condition and will not be removed. If I just remove the floor tiles in the room with devices, the floor in that room will no a little lower than the outside room which blocks the water going out during floor washing.
Attached Thumbnails
broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack2.jpg   broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack-sunroom-1.jpg   broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack-sun-room-2.jpg   broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack-sunroom3.jpg   broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack3.jpg  

broken floor tiles in basement and sunroom-crack1.jpg  
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Old 08-01-2015, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
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I’d have a professional flooring company dealing mainly with tile to remove and replace it. This is not a job that most DIYer can deal with. The old tile “may” contain asbestos that will need to be properly removed and discarded. Also this job should be done at a time of year when the weather is ok to have the basement well ventilated because of toxic fumes that might be needed for the removal of the adhesive left on the floor.
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Old 08-02-2015, 08:59 AM
 
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Can more than 95% of mastic be removed by solvent? What solvent will be used? Is the solvent toxic? Will some solvent be left in the concrete floor for many years?
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Old 08-02-2015, 09:10 AM
 
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Can more than 95% mastic be removed?
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Old 08-02-2015, 09:16 AM
 
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Default Will some solvent stay in the concrete floor for many years?

Quote:
Originally Posted by buicklimit View Post
Can more than 95% mastic be removed?
Will some solvent stay in the concrete floor for many years which causes 2nd air pollution?
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Old 08-02-2015, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
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The solvent should remove all of the mastic, adhesive or whatever else was used to hold the old tile to the floor. The basement must be ventilated to prevent a buildup of toxic fumes, the odor may remain for days however you can and should have the concrete floor washed with soap and water to help remove anything leftover. The odor will dissipate totally in several days if the basement is ventilated. Once dry you can paint the floor or have other new tile installed if you want. They make a good cement floor paint that should last for a long time if applied correctly and new tile are not bad to have either…. I prefer the tile idea because it’s easy to keep clean once installed. Again, this type of work is not something most homeowners do themselves, hiring a good contractor for removal and proper treatment of the tile is important.
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Old 08-02-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Agree with AksarbeN about letting somebody else do the work for you.

However, you can always have the broken tiles removed, and new ones installed in place, or just remove as many as you need to make room for some other tiles to form some kind of pattern that looks good in the room. This way you won't have to deal with a lot of mastic removal, in addition to having the paint the concrete floor. If the new tiles are larger than the ones on the floor, the floor person cuts them to size before installing.

The long-lasting concrete floor paints usually are in epoxy form (part A, and B) that produce hazardous fumes until it sets. There are acrylic-base floor paints that are less hazardous, but preparing the floor for painting will take some time an effort.
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Old 08-02-2015, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Texas
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If a #2 cutback was used for the adhesive, you won't live long enough or have enough solvent to remove all of it. Grinding is far faster and better. It appears that some of it is the old Flecto poured flooring. If so, grinding is in your future. From what I can see in the pics, you're in for some foundation repair too.
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Old 08-02-2015, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
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Exclamation .

Emphasize tile “may” contain asbestos! Use caution if grinding is your choice!
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Old 08-03-2015, 07:22 AM
 
53 posts, read 47,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Agree with AksarbeN about letting somebody else do the work for you.

However, you can always have the broken tiles removed, and new ones installed in place, or just remove as many as you need to make room for some other tiles to form some kind of pattern that looks good in the room. This way you won't have to deal with a lot of mastic removal, in addition to having the paint the concrete floor. If the new tiles are larger than the ones on the floor, the floor person cuts them to size before installing.

The long-lasting concrete floor paints usually are in epoxy form (part A, and B) that produce hazardous fumes until it sets. There are acrylic-base floor paints that are less hazardous, but preparing the floor for painting will take some time an effort.

The old vinyl floor tiles are held on floor by mastic which can be damaged by hot water from a leaking hot heater.

Ceramic floor tiles are held on floor by cement which is more durable.

If I replace the old tiles by ceramic floor tiles, the tiles in that whole room has to be replaced because the ceramic floor tiles are always thicker than the old vinyl floor tiles.
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