Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-09-2018, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,712 posts, read 6,781,047 times
Reputation: 13503

Advertisements

Was copper pipe used in the 1950s? My experience seems to have been that it was iron pipe until maybe 1970, with copper coming into increasing use (as "a cheap-out replacement") from the late 1960s on.

The house piping may have already been replaced, is my thought. It might be in better overall condition than this worrisome symptom indicates.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-09-2018, 02:50 PM
 
213 posts, read 158,179 times
Reputation: 600
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
As a homeowner, you will have the need/privilege/opportunity to buy many tools.
Here are the rules:
1. If you think you will use the tool many times during your lifetime, then buy high quality.
2. If you think you are going to use it once, then low price. Just don't be surprised/angry when it breaks.

Great advice, though I would flip the tool purchase rules slightly. If you need a special tool, and somewhere like Harbor Freight has it for 1/2 of what a name brand would be, grab that and use it for the repair. If you find yourself using it frequently and learn what the limitations/crappiness of the cheaper tool are, go ahead and upgrade to something nice.


Once you use the crappier tool, you'll know exactly what to look for in a higher-quality item. Also, you may be perfectly content with what you have, and would have just be wasting money on something 'better'. It's frequently the case that the name-brand tools are just expensive because you are paying for the name. Many are made in the same factory in China anyway, there just may be slightly higher quality processes used for the expensive tool that would never make it worth the price for the average DIYer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 03:08 PM
 
3,465 posts, read 4,849,339 times
Reputation: 7026
All you need to fix it the right way is a small bottle torch with and a copper pipe soldering kit along with a short piece of copper pipe and two union fittings the proper size. Turn the water off to the house, cut a section out of the pipe, cut a new piece, clean pipe and fittings with sand paper that came with the kit, assemble it all together and then use the torch to heat the fittings and solder them together. It will take less than 30 minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,704 posts, read 25,323,523 times
Reputation: 6131
Pin hole leaks can be caused from he anode rod in the water heater going bad.
You can tell if its the hot or cold water pipe, but running hot water to the furthest fixture from the water heater, then put your hand on the pipe near the leak. If its warm, its a hot water pipe (my guess).

The hose clamp and a piece of inner tube is a great temporary fix, TEMPORARY!
A SharkBite fitting is also an easy fix. You will need to buy a pipe cutter, but they are very inexpensive and very easy to use. Just be sure to turn off the water to the house and drain off front he lower fixture to get water out of the lines.

Or call a plumber.

If it is a hot water pipe (likely is), then there is a good chance there will be more. They are mostly in the horizontal runs of pipe, and not the vertical runs (but can be anywhere). While they can be caused from a loose ground, they are usually caused from the mineral content in the water that the anode rod is designed to get out. If your water heater is over 10 years old, the anode rod is probably shot as well. While they can be replaced, in a old water heater they are VERY difficult to get out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
15,150 posts, read 27,830,067 times
Reputation: 27291
My water heater is only going to be two yrs. old in the spring. I tried to trace the pipe but one end eventually goes up through the floor (can't tell whether it's kitchen or bathroom) - the other end is under ductwork. It is a horizontal pipe (there is also another one right next to it) - I can't tell you how old it is as my late husband had the house before we married - I know he had work done (moved the toilets, etc. in the bathroom) - and we had the kitchen remodeled yrs. ago. - I'm going to go to HD tomorrow to see about something inexpensive as my first recourse and if it continues I'll have to do the plumber thing

Appreciate all the trying to help though
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 04:51 PM
 
23,615 posts, read 70,512,920 times
Reputation: 49338
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevink1955 View Post
Harry, I tried that once and it did nothing to eliminate current flowing on the water pipes. Tracing why I found a few other grounding paths that you can not eliminate.


(1) Heating boiler has a bare grounding conductor that terminates on the same ground bar as the water main ground and has a copper pipe to the water service.



(2) Water heater has a bare grounding conductor that terminates on the same ground bar as the water main ground and has a copper pipe to the water service.


(3) Dishwasher has a bare grounding conductor that terminates on the same ground bar as the water main ground and has a copper pipe to the water service.


(4) Well Pump has a bare grounding conductor that terminates on the same ground bar as the water main ground and has a copper pipe to the water service.


Even more disturbing is Gas dryer has a bare grounding conductor that terminates on the same ground bar as the water main ground and has a Gas pipe that is bonded to copper pipe to the water service.


You really cannot do anything about objectionable current flowing on water piping and trying may cause other hazards if you create a condition where the water line and appliances are at different potentials creating a shock hazard
Excellent sleuthing. What can be done is a parallel bond ground of 8 gauge copper, and then switch the copper pipe out to something that is an insulator. If you can't afford to do it all at once, just insert a small section of plastic to electrically isolate the copper piping. You still need to terminate into a properly installed ground rod.

Any changes are really best done by an experienced electrician.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Podunk, IA
6,143 posts, read 5,270,133 times
Reputation: 7022
JB Weld... it works for everything!
I've repaired a car radiator with it. Fixed it permanaently
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2018, 07:54 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
7,525 posts, read 13,653,901 times
Reputation: 11924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Was copper pipe used in the 1950s? My experience seems to have been that it was iron pipe until maybe 1970, with copper coming into increasing use (as "a cheap-out replacement") from the late 1960s on.

The house piping may have already been replaced, is my thought. It might be in better overall condition than this worrisome symptom indicates.
From 1955 to 1961 my step-father and I built a home, using copper plumbing. Not only for tap water, etc, but radiant heat running hot water thru the concrete slab.

Many years and several owners later, the system developed enough pin hole leaks it was shut down, and forced air was retro-fitted in the house.

Given the house was on well water (not "softened") , that probably didn't help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2018, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,708 posts, read 79,898,255 times
Reputation: 39453
We have used sharkbites extensively starting about 12 years ago in our house, my fathers house, and one brother's house. Some firends and neighbors who either helped us or who saw or heard about them form us (or we helped them with a plumbing issue) also have started using them. Leaks so far: 0. One big advantage of them if you are putting in a valve or a "t" pipe is you can turn them to whatever angle works best. Try that with a soldered pipe.

if you ever need to replace them or open up the pipe to do other work, they release immediately with the release tool and reseal with no problem. Try that with a soldered pipe.

Really the only downside to them is the cost. As they get more popular, the cost is coming down. However as they get cheaper and mass production kicks into full swing, we will likely see more and more leaks or failures. Until then though, they are great.

Plumbers always say shark bites will eventually leak because if they don't leak, they partially eliminate the need for a plumber. However if you are a good plumber, you will still have plenty of work even if sweating pipe goes away altogether. PEX is slowly replacing copper anyway, so brazing skills will not be needed much in about 20 or so years after the existing copper plumbed housing stock gets replaced. For pex, I would trust Shark bites over those pex connecting tools any day, especially since even most plumbers do not seem to know how to use them correctly. If I were to re-plumb my house, I woudl do it all with Sharkbite connectors if I could afford it. The standard PEx connectors restrict the flow too much.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2018, 06:06 AM
 
Location: New Braunfels, TX
7,131 posts, read 11,852,117 times
Reputation: 8049
I service and install water softeners. When shark-bite fittings first came out, they looked like an excellent alternative to traditional connecting methods, but I soon learned that even they have their limitations. If the pipe you're connecting to has burrs/scratches on it, you could well end up with a leak. You need to chamfer the pipe end prior to installation, otherwise a sharp edge may nick the o-ring, creating a leak now, or in the future. There's no structural rigidity with the fittings, so all piping must be supported/clamped.
Pex fitting utilize an integral o-ring to provide the seal. That o-ring will degrade over time due to a number of factors, one of which is chlorine. As it ages, it typically hardens, affecting its' resiliency and its' ability to expand/contract as the pipe moves about due to vibration, etc. At some point, that loss of flexibility will result in a leak. That is why I got away from them and went to the wirsbo fittings - but it wasn't cheap. The hand-held, battery powered expansion tool that I use (DeWalt) ended up being about $700 by the time I got the various heads that I needed, but I feel a LOT better about the installs that I make with it in terms of reliability. Cheap has its' own cost.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top