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Old 07-11-2008, 08:36 AM
 
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I wouldn't attempt crown at all, after watching the fussing that a pro had to do to make ours fit flush on a slightly curved section of ceiling. It doesn't help that I have subclavian steal and my arms go to sleep when I hold them above my head for any length of time.
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Old 07-11-2008, 09:22 AM
 
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Thank you for the additional input-- very helpful. I do not think I'd try anything fancy with crown until I did some easier stuff first and then lots of test pieces! Thanks for the coping saw comment --that is a really good point and something I am going to have to learn as well. A pneumatic nailer will definitely be purchased before I do any crown. That's probably going to be my next purchase, actually.

So going back to the beadboarding...I think I'll still have the Home Depot guys cut the panels (watching how they measure and that they do it upside down). I saw the precut 36" panels and strongly considered those as well. But I wanted to make the paneling a little higher because of the amount of furniture in the room may hide paneling only 36" tall.

I am wondering, though, when I get the panels home, if my room isn't level or walls aren't straight, I am still going to need a saw to make some adjustments. Can I do that with a circular or jigsaw?
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Old 07-11-2008, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I wouldn't attempt crown at all, after watching the fussing that a pro had to do to make ours fit flush on a slightly curved section of ceiling. It doesn't help that I have subclavian steal and my arms go to sleep when I hold them above my head for any length of time.
I have an older home and it seems that none of the corners are quite square. For baseboards and door casing it was no problem (they make wood putty and caulk for a reason) but the crown was just too many angles for my poor brain and I'm not a big fan of the "cheater blocks" I've seen in some homes. I had to call the cavalry for the crown.

One note: They used a 10" compound mitre saw, reporting that a smaller saw results in smoother, more accurate cuts. FWIW...
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Old 07-11-2008, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,322 posts, read 20,058,090 times
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I'm finishing up the same exact project in my son's room.

I have a DeWalt compound miter saw and an old stand-by wooden miter box and hand saw. Honestly- the old box and handsaw works well for me on trim cuts.

We bought G-P beadboard panels in 4x8 sheets and I cut it in thirds using a push-pull saw with very fine teeth. You can clamp a straight edge board (I used a 1x3 board) to the panel and use it as a guide with the pull saw. Nice, straight and non-jagged cuts.

I stained and finished the panels with Cabot stain (amberwood) and topped it with two coats of shellac and then sanded them fine. Gives a really smooth and deep sheen to the panels.

Lowes sells a top rail that has a groove cut in the back that fits over the top of the panels. It covers the top of row of fasteners (I used fine coarsed trim screws). I mitered the corners with the box and hand saw, then cut any irregularities with a fine coping saw. My baseboard trim will be a simple ranch style face, so I'll cope those corners for a nicer fit.

It looks really nice and the panels provide a durable bottom half of the wall where my son does most of his 'hard playing'.

Good luck!
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Old 07-11-2008, 11:59 AM
 
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Another question...should I invest in a sliding saw or no? Does the slide basically allow one to cut larger boards? Sears has a sale going on right now and I am between the 10" compound with stand for $119 or the sliding version with no stand for $199.

Craftsman 10 in. Rear Laser Compound Miter Saw - Model 21231 at Sears.com

Craftsman 10 in. Sliding Miter Saw - Model 21237 at Sears.com
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,322 posts, read 20,058,090 times
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Oh and if you buy the pre-cut panels, they run about $10 a piece. If you buy the 4x8 sheet, it costs $17.. Since I got 3 panels out of one sheet, I saved almost 50%. What a rip (pardon the pun )
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,322 posts, read 20,058,090 times
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Sliders are nice. Wish I had one.
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:05 PM
 
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Threerun, you mean you used, like, an old fashioned saw? What a concept!

Does the panelling cut easily since it's so thin? I am going to get the pre-primed fiberboard stuff since we are painting it white. Your job sounds like it came out really nicely!
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Da Parish
1,127 posts, read 4,847,009 times
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When purchasing your miter saw keep in mind the size of crown, base board, etc. you're going to use. I liked my 10" until I decided to use 5+" crown in the bedroom and now wish I had the 12". It's no real biggie for me because it's only 1 room, but if you're going to do the whole house with larger moulding, you may want the bigger saw.

edit: Ooh, sliding saw! I'd go for it. Also love the miter saw for the wood floor and laminate I've been laying.
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Old 07-11-2008, 12:10 PM
 
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Thanks, Drouzin, I think most of my crown (at this point, anyway), is going to be pretty basic but that's something to consider.
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