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Old 07-11-2008, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,366 posts, read 20,083,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missytoe View Post
Threerun, you mean you used, like, an old fashioned saw? What a concept!

Does the panelling cut easily since it's so thin? I am going to get the pre-primed fiberboard stuff since we are painting it white. Your job sounds like it came out really nicely!
Yup. Sometimes the handsaw beats the power saws (at least for me). Plus- it's a lot easier to carry a miter box and handsaw up to his room and make clean cuts there than drag the trim to the garage, cut, carry back up 2 flights, then back down to make a minor adjustment... Uggh.

You need to use the right blade on paneling, whether using a power device or handsaw. You will find circular blades with fine teeth labeled just for paneling and such.

The push-pull saw works great (if you don't mind the time to cut them). Really was no sweat. Just turn on the radio and saw in time with the beat!

I'll try to get a pic up of the one wall I've finished later on.
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Old 07-11-2008, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
10,447 posts, read 48,235,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missytoe View Post
So going back to the beadboarding...I think I'll still have the Home Depot guys cut the panels (watching how they measure and that they do it upside down). I saw the precut 36" panels and strongly considered those as well. But I wanted to make the paneling a little higher because of the amount of furniture in the room may hide paneling only 36" tall.

I am wondering, though, when I get the panels home, if my room isn't level or walls aren't straight, I am still going to need a saw to make some adjustments. Can I do that with a circular or jigsaw?
Ok just to let you know that there is no such thing as a level home. I have put kitchens in the most expensive homes and they are just as crooked as a cheap bungalo. Crooked walls do not mean the house is a junker.

Here's what you do. Lets just say you make 3 cuts from a sheet yielding you three 32" pieces. Set the panels one inch off the floor after making a level line 33" across the wall span. This way you wont have to worry about the wall going up hill or down hill. The baseboard will cover the gap at the bottom. Your chair rail of course covers the top of the panels.

I like putting some liquid nails behind panels. That PT stuff is like trying to stick wood to wall with ketchup. It dont work. Use liquid nails only and the cheap one for projects works just fine. In other words, the blue label heavy duty one is not necessary. Use 18G pin nails. If you try to nail these in by hand you will dent the panel. I dont care how short you stop the hammer to finish with a punch. If your punch dont damage the wood then your hammer will.

Use Color Putty brand of color keyed putty to fill the nail holes. You will have to go to a woodworkers or lumber yard for this. The putty that Lowes and Home Depot sells is junk and does not work. If you dont want to take my advice on that then at the very least you must buy oil based putty because it never shrinks. All other puttys will shrink and turn color in time.

I usually dont ever recommend Craftsman anything because it is all basicly useless trash but they do make a one gallon very lightweight compressor that I love to death. I use it all the time now myself. I have seen it on sale for about $120. This is the only thing Craftsman brand you will ever see in a professionals tool box. They were the first to come out with a tiny lightweight compressor. It gives 13 shots before the compressor comes on. Awesome !!

Another tip with the pin nails on panel board. Thin panels are always warped. So when you put liquid nails behind it and press the panel on to the wall, it may want to bend or warp out where the warp is. If you shoot the pin nails straight it will just continue to pull out. I angle the pin nails about 22 degrees and once a few nails are in then the nails work together to hold it flat on the wall. If they are angled in then they will not pull out on you.
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Old 07-11-2008, 04:57 PM
 
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Great tips desertsun41. Thank you!
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Old 07-11-2008, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,366 posts, read 20,083,060 times
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I opted for no glue but used 8d ring shanked nails and cut my bead board to lap at joists, nailing one at the bottom (covered by baseboard) and one in the middle. The top was screwed in using fine finishing scewes and will be covered by the top rail. That way if my son outgrows the paneling (or the next owner doesn't like it), they can pop it out without ripping the paper of the drywall behind it like glue will do.

But yes- set a level line at say 33" above the floor, all the way around and let the bottom be covered by baseboard.
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Old 07-11-2008, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
I opted for no glue but used 8d ring shanked nails and cut my bead board to lap at joists, nailing one at the bottom (covered by baseboard) and one in the middle. The top was screwed in using fine finishing scewes and will be covered by the top rail. That way if my son outgrows the paneling (or the next owner doesn't like it), they can pop it out without ripping the paper of the drywall behind it like glue will do.

But yes- set a level line at say 33" above the floor, all the way around and let the bottom be covered by baseboard.
True that if you use the glue it will damage the wallboard badly if one ever wants to tear it out some day. Most people dont live in the same home for more then 5 years but it is a consideration.

I still dont know about screws though. Did you countersink them and putty over the one in the middle?
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Old 07-11-2008, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,366 posts, read 20,083,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertsun41 View Post
True that if you use the glue it will damage the wallboard badly if one ever wants to tear it out some day. Most people dont live in the same home for more then 5 years but it is a consideration.

I still dont know about screws though. Did you countersink them and putty over the one in the middle?
Screws are a the top and bottom is nailed, both covered by trim. The middle of the panel is fastened with the same 8d ring shanked trim nail, then punched in. Just a little dab over the trim nail and you're done.
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Old 07-12-2008, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,692 posts, read 24,268,356 times
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Just a minor point about "Here's what you do. Lets just say you make 3 cuts from a sheet yielding you three 32" pieces." After you cut the first two at 32", you will find your last one will be about 31 3/4" because of the thickness of the saw blade.

ALWAYS take the thickness of the blade into consideration when planning.
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Old 07-12-2008, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,366 posts, read 20,083,060 times
Reputation: 19858
You can be short on one or more no big deal, the baseboard covers it up. Just make sure your top line is even.

Here's where I'm at thus far-



This the top rail I was referring to:


And the hand tools I'm using:


My son likes the colors- picked them actually. We're using canoe oars for curtain rods, he has USGS topo maps for the wall, and one giant map of WV circa 1917.. Pretty cool.

Last edited by Threerun; 07-12-2008 at 11:33 AM..
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Old 07-12-2008, 11:40 AM
 
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I agree crown molding depending om the type can be very tricky to cut and install. I thnik thsi is best left to a expert as if help a friend that does finish work for a living and saw waht it takes. Still could do the job he did on complicated molding. Chair and base is easy really if you take your time. That said the compund miter saw I bought has been a real jewel in many projects I have done. Have the paneling cut at a shop or rent a table saw unless your ging to use it alot.
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Old 07-23-2008, 03:27 PM
 
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So my project is complete and here is a summary of how it went:

I had the beadboard panels cut by Home Depot. The guy totally knew what he was doing and had clearly been working there a while, which was great.

The baseboard in the bedroom is original so I decided to leave it there and place the panels above it. The baseboards stick out from the wall almost 1" so I was able to put the 1/4" panels on AND cover the bottom raw edge with a 1/2" thin trim piece and still having the baseboard stick out further than the rest.

Cutting the beadboard was a PITA. We tried a fine tooth handsaw at first and we just could not get the thing to cut accurately or nicely. We then moved on to one of those little multi-purpose tools that had a jigsaw looking blade on it. That did okay (except for the part that we burned because the blade wasn't tightened correcty...oopsie), and worked especially well for the areas around outlets and other detail work, but cutting the long sides of the panelling was not as accurate. Finally we borrowed our friend's jigsaw and that worked great.

We glued the panels on with Liquid Nails and reinforced them with nails on the studs. There were two corners of the panels that didn't want to stay put with the glue, and the nails wouldn't hold because they weren't going into studs at that particular location but the chair rail helped to hold that all down eventually.

For the trim, we ended up buying the Craftsman 10" compound sliding miter saw and I loved that thing! It was easy to cut the trim and do the 45 degree miters.

Turns out the room is quite level but the walls were a little uneven in parts. Our job is not perfect but I praise that little thing called caulking! It hid all kinds of gaps and the little goofs and once we painted it, it turned out really nicely.

On a side note, that "primed" fiberboard beadboard paneling we bought needed three coats of paint so be prepared if you use it. One of the posters had mentioned that the panelling tends to be warped and I did notice that but the material is flexible enough that the adhesive and nails took care of that with no troubles.

I feel very proud to have completed my first DIY project.
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