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Old 02-27-2009, 09:15 AM
 
28 posts, read 148,177 times
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Anyone have cork flooring? Do you love it, hate it? Why? We need to put flooring down in our family room/kitchen area and are not sure about the material we want to use. We are thinking tile, but thought maybe it would be warmer and more comfortable to put cork. What do you think?
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Old 02-27-2009, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Montrose, CA
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It's easier on the feet than tile, but I think the patterns are still kind of limited. That's the only issue I have with it. It is nice and "green" though because it's a self-renewing resource (cork trees don't have to be cut down to harvest cork and they regrow their removed cork bark every year).
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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I put a cork plank floating floor in my kitchen (over a radiant floor) and I like the way it looks. The rest of the house is tile, and cork is much nicer to stand on, plus dishes and glassware don't tend to break when dropped.

The surface will scratch and dent. The dents - so far - have been temporary. The scratches are more permanent. The pattern I picked (kind of a quilt patchwork of rectangles) makes the scratches a little less visible, but you can see it when you clean the floor.

The particular brand I bought (available at Lowe's) did not "click together" very well, and I've had problem with the floor trying to come apart, especially where there were some odd corners where the kitchen meets the pantry. Buy a different brand.

The cork tiles come in many more patterns and colors than the floating floors. I've heard that the darker colors fade faster - and show scratches - more than the lighter colors, but I can't vouch for that.
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Old 02-27-2009, 02:28 PM
 
28 posts, read 148,177 times
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Thank you so much for the first had info. Do you feel like the floor gets really clean or do you have to clean it a special way? I am worried that it will absorb spills and get gross, is that a problem with this material. Would you still install this flooring, even with the scratches?

Anyone else have cork flooring in your house?
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Old 02-27-2009, 02:56 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,711,352 times
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I'd buy a better quality brand, but I'd do it again.

It has a polyurethane coating on it, so it doesn't absorb spills. Of course, I wipe them up quickly. I had a (brand new!) casserole crack as I was taking it out of the oven and spill an entire load of tomato-sauce-based rigatoni casserole on the floor and it cleaned up without leaving a spill.

I "damp" mop it once a week or so (with a very dry damp mop) and then about once a month I use a polyeurethane-based cleaner/finish product and it keeps it looking new.

I'd also do a better job of training my two dogs that the kitchen is verboten to them, and that'd cut down on the scratches, I think. Plus then they wouldn't be under my feet while I'm cooking.
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Old 02-27-2009, 08:38 PM
 
28 posts, read 148,177 times
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Thank you so much for taking the time to help me out. I am really leaning toward cork at this point. How is it viewed in regards to resale. Is it considered along the lines of hard wood and tile or is it considered a step down?
Thanks again
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Old 02-28-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: wrong planet
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We put down a cork floor in our kitchen a year ago and love it. Nice and soft to stand on and warmer than tile. I don't know anything about resale value because we decided to go with what we want, rather than worry about that. The price is comparable to hardwood floor. I wouldn't hesitate to install it in other rooms in the future, should the need arise.
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Old 03-01-2009, 12:15 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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I spec cork flooring frequently in my projects, typically in the kitchen as others here have done, and my clients love it. I've used in 90 y.o houses as well as mid-century and contemporary and it works great as a complimentary finish. It is far more durable and water resistant than you might imagine and supremely comfortable underfoot- and if you have small children or tend to be clumsy as I am, breakage will be vastly reduced. There are different styles and finishes so do your research.
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Old 03-02-2009, 05:43 AM
 
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I am starting to renovate the house for it to be eco friendly and I must admit that cork flooring does not appeal to me BUT I think I will give it a try.
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Old 04-14-2009, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, Austin, Texas
3,958 posts, read 6,190,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuSuSushi View Post
It's easier on the feet than tile, but I think the patterns are still kind of limited. That's the only issue I have with it. It is nice and "green" though because it's a self-renewing resource (cork trees don't have to be cut down to harvest cork and they regrow their removed cork bark every year).
Man there are some crazy cork patterns online and in select local dealers. Designs that look like tiger stripes and normal patterns that are dyed very loud colors. Yes the Home Depot, Lowes, and Lumber Liquidators all have token selections so more variety will only be found elsewhere.
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