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Old 04-01-2009, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
1,410 posts, read 3,797,790 times
Reputation: 387

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Maybe someone here can lend some help. I installed a bathroom sink a couple years ago (i watched while a friend of a friend did it). Recently the little plastic circle holders undernear the sink where the faucet comes out - one of them broke and now the faucet moves around at the base of the sink. Its quite annoying and i feel that eventually the grinding could cause something to break. I tried to glue the plastic piece back together and make it stick but its hard to get at and pretty cheap - it didnt work. I was thinking about filling the holes where the faucet comes out with caulk to make it hold in place. Is this a good idea?

G Man
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
10,445 posts, read 48,027,412 times
Reputation: 10589
You can purchase those plastic nuts that thread up to secure the faucett to the sink seperatly in the home center. You will have to undue the feed line to get the new plastic nut on.

Just shut off the small shut off valve, open the faucet to empty the pressure in the line, and undue the compression nut over the shut off valve. Take the old plastic nut off and put the new one on.

You might struggle to get your pliers up there to tighten the new one. There is a specialized wrench to to this but with a little creativity you can do it with a larger standard pliers.

If you are uncomfortable with this then any handyman can fix it up in 10 minutes.
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Old 04-01-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
1,410 posts, read 3,797,790 times
Reputation: 387
Thanks for the info. I'm going to give it a shot. I'll let ya know what happens.

G Man
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
5,987 posts, read 11,163,038 times
Reputation: 36717
Remember they are plastic. Do not over tighten.
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Old 04-01-2009, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Northern California
3,708 posts, read 14,159,869 times
Reputation: 1914
They're called basin locknuts. And you can buy metal ones instead of plastic. The plastic ones will just break again .
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Old 04-01-2009, 05:07 PM
 
Location: where nothin ever grows. no rain or rivers flow, TX
2,028 posts, read 7,860,622 times
Reputation: 447
or you can put a vicegrip (knock off) on it and leave it there
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Old 04-02-2009, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
10,445 posts, read 48,027,412 times
Reputation: 10589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wysiwyg View Post
or you can put a vicegrip (knock off) on it and leave it there
The OP is serious. Comedy in this thread is not really proper.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:08 AM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 13,258,203 times
Reputation: 3535
Don't forget to turn your main water valve off before disconnecting the water line from the fawcet ! Some of the plastic lock nuts are better than others, Get one with wings and hand tighten it, it'll work fine.
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Old 04-02-2009, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,307 posts, read 37,549,371 times
Reputation: 7169
I hate plumbing.
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:58 AM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 13,258,203 times
Reputation: 3535
I don't mind installing new plumbing but working on 80 year old plumbing is freaking scary, especially in a downtown area where buildings share walls. To make it even scarier is when you have a residential rental upstairs and a commercial business rental downstairs. Believe me you don't want to be me and have a plumbing problem !
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