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Old 07-23-2009, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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What should I consider for a good well and septic test?
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Old 07-23-2009, 11:46 AM
 
Location: MN
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When we got ours done, we used a water testing company, and they tested the levels of minerals in the water.

For our septic test, they pumped it out and verified it looked good. Just a local septic person can certify a tank.
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Old 07-23-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Sometimes Maryland, sometimes NoVA. Depends on the day of the week
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Well - Wait for Driller to show up. She will give you all the info you need

Septic - talk to your septic guy. You want to ensure your tank is good, your baffles good, your drainfield good. Find out when the sellers last pumped the tank, if never, but scared b/c the scum has likely filled the tank, gotten out to the drainfield, and clogged the drainfield.
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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Should they pump the tank as part of the test? I'll PM Driller, too. Thanks guys.
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Old 07-23-2009, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
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No they shouldn't pump the tank as part of the inspection. Inspection should run $150-$200, pumping a tank would be an additional $200-$300. I would advise not pumping the tank and doing the inspection only, in case you walk from the house you will have pumped the tank for the current owners for no reason.
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Old 07-23-2009, 06:25 PM
 
24,841 posts, read 35,794,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
What should I consider for a good well and septic test?
The first thing with a well is get the legal record of that well. You need to know what kind of a well and how old it is. The you can get from your local health department. They also will have your septic record.
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Wherever I park the motorhome
286 posts, read 1,435,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
What should I consider for a good well and septic test?
I assume you are thinking of buying a house with its own well and septic systems.

There's not much testing that can be done on a septic system except to look at the drain field area for surface water and how things in the house drain/flush. That's unless you have a tank type and have it pumped to be able to look at the condition of the pipes in the tank and the inside of the tank. There are many types of on site residential septic systems, so find out what type you're dealing with, and then call septic system guys for their advice on that type.

Wells... you need a water analysis for hardness, iron, TDS, pH, nitrates, nitrites and Coliform bacteria at least and if possible, manganese, sulfates, chlorides, sodium and alkalinity. Those are teh most common potential problems but there are tests for anything from A to Z, which most labs will attempt to sell you.

As to inspecting or "testing" a well... The critical components are the pump and pressure tank. Any home inspector will note pressure readings and the gpm water delivered and general condition of the plumbing, electrical and teh pressure tank. There are those that may do a pumping test of the well and determine the recovery rate of the well, max gpm of the pump etc. but they are not so common. That can be fairly pricey.

Not all states will have a well log on the well and if you could get a copy for this well, the original information gathered when the well was 'drilled' may not be accurate today; such as pump sizes (gpm and hp), the depth of the pump if you have a submersible pump, the recovery rate gpm of the well etc.. And not all states use the health department to maintain the logs.
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:44 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 35,794,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
I assume you are thinking of buying a house with its own well and septic systems.

There's not much testing that can be done on a septic system except to look at the drain field area for surface water and how things in the house drain/flush. That's unless you have a tank type and have it pumped to be able to look at the condition of the pipes in the tank and the inside of the tank. There are many types of on site residential septic systems, so find out what type you're dealing with, and then call septic system guys for their advice on that type.

Wells... you need a water analysis for hardness, iron, TDS, pH, nitrates, nitrites and Coliform bacteria at least and if possible, manganese, sulfates, chlorides, sodium and alkalinity. Those are teh most common potential problems but there are tests for anything from A to Z, which most labs will attempt to sell you.

As to inspecting or "testing" a well... The critical components are the pump and pressure tank. Any home inspector will note pressure readings and the gpm water delivered and general condition of the plumbing, electrical and teh pressure tank. There are those that may do a pumping test of the well and determine the recovery rate of the well, max gpm of the pump etc. but they are not so common. That can be fairly pricey.

Not all states will have a well log on the well and if you could get a copy for this well, the original information gathered when the well was 'drilled' may not be accurate today; such as pump sizes (gpm and hp), the depth of the pump if you have a submersible pump, the recovery rate gpm of the well etc.. And not all states use the health department to maintain the logs.
So, to get the log will do great harm????? Only a driller can inspect a well properly. I need more information to give advise. Of couse, you can try and sell now......
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Old 07-24-2009, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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Hi Driller thanks! I contacted the county and they said that the well/septic were installed in about 1963 when the house was built. There was a relatively recent upgrade to the septic which was the addition of "drainage" fields? Anyway, my stupid phone died and we got disconnected. Anything else I should do besides the test?
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Old 07-24-2009, 10:28 AM
 
24,841 posts, read 35,794,649 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Hi Driller thanks! I contacted the county and they said that the well/septic were installed in about 1963 when the house was built. There was a relatively recent upgrade to the septic which was the addition of "drainage" fields? Anyway, my stupid phone died and we got disconnected. Anything else I should do besides the test?
Get the records from them. We need to know what kind of well. 1963 I am thinking an old 2" maybe. If you are negotiating on the home, try for a new well. In 1963 the size and design just wasn't what it is today.
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