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Old 12-15-2009, 08:19 AM
 
851 posts, read 3,507,553 times
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My water heater is on the second floor above the master bathroom. Everytime it heats up a lot of water, usually after or during a shower, it makes bubbling and ticking noise. When you hear it near the heater, it's not too bad; somehow this noise gets amplified and transferred downstairs to the master bathroom. When sleeping in the master bedroom, this noise sounds like someone lit a bunch of firecrackers upstairs for a long time - not that loud but getting close in a quiet night.

What can I do about this besides plugging my ears with earplugs?
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Old 12-15-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,323 posts, read 60,527,727 times
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Is it in a closet by itself? Or in a laundry room?
Is it seating directly in an overflow pan, and on the floor? Or is it elevated and in a pan?
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Old 12-15-2009, 03:04 PM
 
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This happened to me about 5 years ago with an old HWH in a town with hard water. As it was explained to me, when the water heats up there is lots of sediment on the bottom. We replaced the heater and no more problem. another solution would be to open drain valve and if this is the cause lots of sediment will come out. WARNING, sometimes you can't close the valve back all the way
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Old 12-15-2009, 03:27 PM
 
851 posts, read 3,507,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Is it in a closet by itself? Or in a laundry room?
Is it seating directly in an overflow pan, and on the floor? Or is it elevated and in a pan?
In a closet upstairs by itself and seated in an overflow pan. It's about 10 years old.
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Old 12-15-2009, 03:30 PM
 
851 posts, read 3,507,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by exsci teacher View Post
This happened to me about 5 years ago with an old HWH in a town with hard water. As it was explained to me, when the water heats up there is lots of sediment on the bottom. We replaced the heater and no more problem. another solution would be to open drain valve and if this is the cause lots of sediment will come out. WARNING, sometimes you can't close the valve back all the way
what do I do if I cannot close the valve back? That sounds like the sediment was blocking the valve.
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Old 12-15-2009, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Knoxville
4,677 posts, read 24,068,975 times
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When that happens, you remove the entire valve and replace it with a 3/4" nipple and a regular hose faucet.
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Old 12-15-2009, 08:55 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
3,490 posts, read 19,081,621 times
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make sure the replacement is metal...not plastic. the plastic drain valves are the ones that will not close. Drain the tank about once a year to remove the sediment. if your tank is 10 yrs. old it may be close to the end of it's life. Try draining it and the noise will go away. When and if you replace it, put in a brass drain valve on the new one before it is put inand drain it about every 12 months. That will make the life of the water heater about 5 years more.
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Old 12-16-2009, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
16,323 posts, read 60,527,727 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStupid View Post
In a closet upstairs by itself and seated in an overflow pan. It's about 10 years old.
I'm guessing your just dealing with expansion and contraction. And it could be slightly binding. Exhaust vent if it's gas and/or the supply, feed lines.
And obviously no insulation in the floor.
It could be as easy as a little shift on the floor (which would require draining). The next step would be to isolate the W/H from the pan- like 1/4-1/2" pieces of rubber (but that might require re-soldering the lines).
At 10yrs of age it shouldn't be on it's way out (unless its a very bad hard water issue as stated before). Average lifespan is 15-18yrs.
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Old 12-18-2009, 08:45 AM
 
229 posts, read 740,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheStupid View Post
My water heater is on the second floor above the master bathroom. Everytime it heats up a lot of water, usually after or during a shower, it makes bubbling and ticking noise. When you hear it near the heater, it's not too bad; somehow this noise gets amplified and transferred downstairs to the master bathroom. When sleeping in the master bedroom, this noise sounds like someone lit a bunch of firecrackers upstairs for a long time - not that loud but getting close in a quiet night.

What can I do about this besides plugging my ears with earplugs?

Is it electric?

If so, this is normal. If you get close to it you will find that the noise is happening where the electric elements are.

You could buy a water heater insulating blanket. That would help to deaden the sound.
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Old 12-18-2009, 09:10 AM
 
536 posts, read 1,804,951 times
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If your tank is 10 years old, and has had no maintenance, it could be well past it's lifetime.

From what I have been told, 6 to 8 years is normal. In one house we had to replace at 6.
We were in a newer neighborhood one time and all the houses were about the same age. There was a sudden increase in water pressure for some reason. Over the next week there were water heaters lined up on the curb every few houses.

I am sure brand, usage, gas or electric can all be a factor. But you don't want that leaking if it is on the second floor

But replace as a last option.
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