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Old 01-22-2010, 09:20 AM
Status: "Functionally obsolete" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
44,023 posts, read 54,877,079 times
Reputation: 78397

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Our house is 18 years old and a deck with roof was built off the family room at the same time (the roof is integrated into the main house). It is supported by wood posts set in concrete. About 8 years ago we had it enclosed by Patio Enclosures. Just this year, we noticed that one corner of the porch has sunk about 1/2" causing the slidering windows to not close.
I don't know the best way to fix this. Can something be done to the affected post, or do we jack up the corner and put in a new post next to the existing post, or what?
I think it's kind of odd that after so many years this would happen.
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Old 01-22-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Johns Creek, GA
15,802 posts, read 58,860,895 times
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Without more information, or actually doing a physical inspection- it would be hard to speculate exactly what has transpired.
An unusual amount of rain could cause a footing to sink, Or it could be the post itself. You say the post is set in concrete (which is one of my pet-peeves; it makes it harder to replace when necessary)- but there's no way to know how far. So, there's no way to know how much concrete is below the post.
Maybe the post in question hasn't sunk- but the other has heaved. Tree roots are generally the culprit there.
Concrete footings should be somewhat pyramid shaped- to displace the load over a large area (not just a straight hole in the ground). Also, for OH that footing should be somewhere around 2-2.5' deep.
Depending on how the post is attached to the deck- it maybe as simple as jacking up the deck removing old post and installing a new one the correct length.
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Old 01-22-2010, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Sherwood, OR
666 posts, read 1,757,993 times
Reputation: 679
Quote:
Originally Posted by K'ledgeBldr View Post
Also, for OH that footing should be somewhere around 2-2.5' deep.
I think it would be at least 36". That what is was in Pittsburgh and NE Ohio is probably very similar. Regardless, the codes will determine the footer depth.

I completely agree with your comment about setting posts in concrete. Setting them "on" concrete with a mechanical connection makes life much easier and the post last longer.

As to why its sagging now it could be many things as previously suggested. What structural load was the deck originally designed to carry? I don't know what kind of enclosure was installed or if they beefed up the structure when they installed it, but it could be adding significant weight to a structure not designed to carry it.

You may be able to determine if one corner has heaved or the other corner has fallen by looking where the rim joists attach to the house / ledger. If a corner gets pushed up, you may find the bottom of the rim joist has slightly pulled away from the house. If a corner drops, you may find the top of the rim joist has slightly pulled away from the house. But depending on the size of your deck and the fact that its only dropped a 1/2", it may not even be noticeable.

In short, you need to figure out what is causing the problem prior to correcting it otherwise you could be doing a temporary repair to a larger problem.
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Old 07-23-2011, 09:20 AM
 
1 posts, read 20,923 times
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I would contact the contractors who enclosed your deck... supports for most decks are not designed for the added weight of walls and windows. If they did not do anything to strengthen the framing and foundation, they may be liable for repairs and/or damages because of this "oversight". If the structure below the deck was strengthened, then the issue is with the soil.

First, contact the city code inspector, as they may be able to offer solutions. Then contact the contractor who built the enclosure. See if they will take corrective action since they were probably at fault, anyway.

Resist Temptation
Regardless of the solution you choose, try to resist the urge to completely correct the sag. In most cases this will cause more damage to your home. Some of the possible damage includes possible cracked sheathing, parted roof decking, cracked windows, even wiring getting pulled out of conduit. For sticky windows/doors, it's best to remove and reinstall them, as this fixes most minor warpage. Properly installed rim can be used cover minor changes in window positioning.

Understand the Causes of Sagging Walls/Decks to Determine Repair
If the sagging is a result of the framing or supports being too weak, then the deck will need to be shored up and you will have to add bracing as well as additional supports. On the other hand, soft spots in the soil occur frequently in many areas of the country, which can be overcome by making the foundation deeper. Here's a solution that can work well to fix a sagging deck.

Repairing Your Sagging Deck Yourself
Unless you know construction and basic home engineering principles, I do not recommend doing this yourself. However, I understand
First rig temporary supports for the affected area of the deck. Nothing fancy, just make sure they are sturdy.

Next, remove the existing support pad/footer for that post and dig down an additional 1.5-2 feet below the original bottom of that footer. (more may be needed in very wet or loose soil) If there is an actual stem wall or long footer, a different approach is necessary.

Fill the hole with concrete to ground level. Slightly below ground level is okay if you want to use the original pad or post support to keep the aesthetics consistent.

Reinstall corner post.

I hope this helps.

Last edited by DonHatton; 07-23-2011 at 09:47 AM.. Reason: Added info
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Old 06-15-2015, 12:38 PM
 
1 posts, read 14,182 times
Reputation: 10
I too have a sinking sunroom. The addition was put on by trevious owners and now i am stuck trying to raise the room. We tried jacks which are under the sunroom in a crawl space. But when we did that we could not open our sliding doors. We had a man come out and he was rude and told me that the room was braced wrong. The beams were 2 beems screwed together in the middle so that is why its sinking. How did it pass inspection?
I'm afraid to call the village because they might think i want them to fix it, so i am calling everywhere to get quotes, because we want to sell our house because we are retired and the home is too big, but we know it won't pass inspection. The ony thing the first contractor said is i first have to pay $750.00 for an engenieer inspector and then he will tell the contractor how to fix it and he did not give me a price but said it would be a lot of money! Please help!
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:48 PM
 
10 posts, read 24,828 times
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I have the same issue. The far end of my sun-room has sunk slowly over time and was not installed on a proper foundation. The other side is fine because it is attached to the house. The far corners that are sinking are resting on cinder-blocks and I have no idea how deep they go into the ground. I have crank-style windows and none of them shut squarely and even the door sticks in one corner. A temporary solution was to string a cable, corner to corner on the door and winch it together. As a solution for the sun-room, I was told to lay a beam on the ground, and get two adjustable posts to lift the porch up, starting with the lowest corner and then alternating slowly between the corners until it is level. Then I was told to dig a 2' x 2' x 2' hole next to the cinder-blocks and pour in a cement footer. In New York State it should really be 2-1/2' deep to get under the frost line so it won't heave. But then again, heaving doesn't appear to be my issue... But this will be difficult (if not impossible) because it is only a 3' crawl space so I would have to dig it with a small hand shovel. Then I was told to put a "sono-tube" next to the old cinder-blocks on top of the footer, and pour new cement into it - also impossible because how can I pour anything into a tube that goes all the way to the porch floor (crawl space ceiling) ??? I think that if I am somehow able to pour the new footer, I will just use new cinder-blocks. I think the footers (or lack thereof) that are used now are the problem, not the cinder-blocks. Hope this helps, but I'm no expert. I'm just a sun-room sinking homeowner like you.... If you get any further information please pass it along by posting here.
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Old 09-11-2015, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Berkeley Neighborhood, Denver, CO USA
16,691 posts, read 25,804,559 times
Reputation: 29919
Sinking sun?
Wait until dawn when the sun will rise.
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Old 09-12-2015, 10:58 AM
Status: "Functionally obsolete" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
44,023 posts, read 54,877,079 times
Reputation: 78397
This is a very old thread, but what happened is that DH jacked up the offending corner and supported it somehow. I think a shim of some kind, or an additional post. We sold that house 5 years ago, so don't know if the fix stayed fixed, but when we left, the windows closed smoothly and all was well.
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