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Old 06-02-2007, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,086 posts, read 25,925,498 times
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I am considering these. Do you like them and are they easy to maintain/keep clean? What's good and bad about them?

They seem indestructible and that's a good thing for me!
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Old 06-02-2007, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 28,480,100 times
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I love terrazzo. If you are in a hot climate it will help keep it feeling a little cooler indoors in the summer.

It is no harder to take care of than any other wax floor. You have to clean it and wax it.

The only problems that I have ever seen with them is that your slab must be perfectly smooth, and stay that way. If your slab settles or tree roots intrude from underneath the terrazzo will crack, and it never looks the same if you have to repair it.
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Old 06-02-2007, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Debary, Florida
2,267 posts, read 2,612,556 times
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I love how they look as well but I think I will probably go with tile for the very reasons you mention...should things shift and crack, it can be repaired.

I have seen some really gorgeous patterns and colors in terrazzo.
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Old 06-02-2007, 02:20 PM
 
11,254 posts, read 44,563,494 times
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Greatly depends upon your substrate and fundation.

If you are on a concrete slab that is stable, then an epoxy terrazzo floor is well worth considering for it's looks and long term durability. It's the lowest life cycle cost product you can install, and it requires minimal maintenance compared to any other flooring material. That's why it's chosen for commercial high traffic areas, such as public buildings or airports.

The big drawback on installation is that it's a time consumptive and messy process to install the t-strips, slurry, then grind, then grout, then grind the floor again. For a small residential area, such as a kitchen, it will be very expensive and difficult to get equipment into that location and install a true terrazzo floor. We have installed epoxy terrazzo floors in very high end homes on new construction where cost and time of installation was not factor.

In an existing home, it would be easier and more cost effective to use terrazzo tiles and grout them, similar to a tile floor ....
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Old 06-02-2007, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 28,480,100 times
Reputation: 7147
I have seen the terrazzo tiles. I thought about using them for a kitchen counter top, but they were cost prohibitive.
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Old 06-02-2007, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Debary, Florida
2,267 posts, read 2,612,556 times
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If anyone ever gets to the airport in Fort Myers, they have a gorgeous floor with what looks like sea shells set in it.

The beaches on the barrier islands there are known as some of the best shelling beaches in the world.

It has SUCH a Florida look, thats why I LOVE terrazzo.
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Old 06-02-2007, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
14,086 posts, read 25,925,498 times
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I think I will do the terrazzo tile. That way I can do it myself and if necessary, it can be repaired. Hadn't thought about using it on the countertops too. That's a good idea. Thanks!
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Old 06-02-2007, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 28,480,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I think I will do the terrazzo tile. That way I can do it myself and if necessary, it can be repaired. Hadn't thought about using it on the countertops too. That's a good idea. Thanks!
Be sure to post some pics when you are done
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Old 01-02-2008, 10:16 AM
 
3 posts, read 19,274 times
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Hello Yellowsnow, I have photos from a fabulous modern inlaid marble terrazzo design that I believe I can replicate as a do-it-yourself project. If you would like to see these photos and share other information on gluing the layout, mixing and pouring the epoxy, grinding and sealing the result, please let me know. I would be please to share information and resources.

Last edited by golfgal; 01-02-2008 at 06:40 PM.. Reason: removed email--use DM's for personal contacts
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Old 01-02-2008, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,105,966 times
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I set my own terrazzo floors and it was easier than tile. Unfortunately for most people, the process required a lot of time and water while grinding. I also goofed when making the mix and have uneven aggregate in my bedroom. Yet the whole thing cost me 200.00 and the time to build a grinder. I used plain old white cement, fine sand and marble, granite or those red little rocks. The bulk of the materials came from a marble wholesaler's scraps and I used a small rock crusher. If any part of your floor has a crack, you will need to install an expansion joint and reinforce the area with mesh. If I end up moving and building a new house I am going to do this all over again.
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