Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-29-2023, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,717 posts, read 12,462,759 times
Reputation: 20227

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by don6170 View Post
Are you sure it wasn't do to poor workmanship when soldering the pipes/connectors? I would think a chemical bond would last longer than a crimped connection.
Yes, failures weren't at the soldering joints. And anyhow a faulty solder is usually apparent immediately.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-29-2023, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
4,259 posts, read 3,182,728 times
Reputation: 4713
Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoPro11 View Post
Polybutylene pipes, also known as poly pipes, can be problematic. They're prone to breaking and causing leaks due to exposure to chemicals and sunlight. If you're considering a house with poly pipes, be ready for potential replacement costs, which can vary depending on your home's size and layout.

Consider switching to PEX pipes for a more reliable option. Learn more about it https://videochatapro.com/plumbing-d...mbing-with-pex But always consult with a professional plumber for the best advice.
I have personally sectioned many pieces of polybutylene pipes where the water was high in chemicals. I have never seen a poly pipe fail from this (although there are some pictures on the internet). The main issues with poly are the plastic fittings which tend to crack and poor crimping (the original crimp tool functioned poorly). I currently have poly plumbing in my house with copper fittings...29 years and not a single issue. Pex is a far better product but there are class action lawsuits involving corrosion of their fittings produced by a few manufacturers. Copper is great.....as long as your water is not acidic...then you will get pin holes all over the place. Over the last 30 years I have probably seen more copper failures than Polybutylene. Also keep in mind that copper comes in 3 different wall thicknesses (L,M,K) and builders generally don't use the best as the cost is much higher. CPVC is common in some locations and while easy to work with it will burst in a heartbeat if it freezes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-29-2023, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
43,348 posts, read 77,209,038 times
Reputation: 45695
Quote:
Originally Posted by carcrazy67 View Post
I have personally sectioned many pieces of polybutylene pipes where the water was high in chemicals. I have never seen a poly pipe fail from this (although there are some pictures on the internet). The main issues with poly are the plastic fittings which tend to crack and poor crimping (the original crimp tool functioned poorly). I currently have poly plumbing in my house with copper fittings...29 years and not a single issue. Pex is a far better product but there are class action lawsuits involving corrosion of their fittings produced by a few manufacturers. Copper is great.....as long as your water is not acidic...then you will get pin holes all over the place. Over the last 30 years I have probably seen more copper failures than Polybutylene. Also keep in mind that copper comes in 3 different wall thicknesses (L,M,K) and builders generally don't use the best as the cost is much higher. CPVC is common in some locations and while easy to work with it will burst in a heartbeat if it freezes.
Zurn QPEX Fittings are a good example....


Photos in the blog:

https://blog.mikejaquish.com/2016/12...qpex-fittings/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2023, 05:08 AM
 
30,478 posts, read 21,329,971 times
Reputation: 12026
Quote:
Originally Posted by NC_newcomer View Post
What's the story about polybutylene pipes?

Our realtor says that if we buy a house with "poly pipes" we should replace them right away. And she was very excited every time we looked at a house that had already had the pipes replaced.

So, what's the story. She simply said "they break." And is it a costly thing to do (for example, in a 1600 sq ft, 2 story, 3 bed/2.5 ba house.)
Many apartment places had to have them removed and replaced. One place i know never had them replaced and always have leaks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2023, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Near Falls Lake
4,259 posts, read 3,182,728 times
Reputation: 4713
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Zurn QPEX Fittings are a good example....


Photos in the blog:

https://blog.mikejaquish.com/2016/12...qpex-fittings/
Over the years I've seen many a corroded Zurn fitting! There is also a class action against NIBCO (pipe, fittings and clamps) that was settled a few years back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > House

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top