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Old 08-21-2010, 09:17 PM
 
12,567 posts, read 19,355,956 times
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I was thinkin the same. Maybe DFW is one.
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 29,650,897 times
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Pay in NY has got to be up there too
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:25 PM
 
12,567 posts, read 19,355,956 times
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What about Atlanta?
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Old 08-21-2010, 11:15 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,597,244 times
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Stats 101 and CommonSense 101

Most ultra-high incomes/net worths anywhere are not based upon silly salaries

Manhattan's financial industry is built upon puny base salaries and massive cash and equity bonuses for 20 and 30-something yo kids (and their elders)

SiliconValley's wealthiest engineers all have puny salaries and amassed their net worths by equity comp at then-start-ups like google, etc

Houston and Dallas' energy industries pay handsomely on scale of Corporate America, but major wealth is always derived by clever guys who are early employees at some energy start-up like an XTO or an energy hedge fund like Centaurus, not old-line, sclerotic cos. like Exxon (or Microsoft of last 10yrs or Google of last 3 yrs)

Consider that Centaurus' 35 yo founder earns more in one yr than Exxon's 55yo CEO has in total net worth...
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Old 08-22-2010, 12:16 PM
 
1,290 posts, read 5,098,026 times
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You don't have to be an engineer. All of these giant companies have well paid corporate jobs. Accountants, Finance, HR, IT, etc. The Finance guy at a super major might not make as much as the geologists and engineers, but he probably falls into the category to make it a "high paid" career.

Also, making six figures is pretty awesome if you can get it, but its not quite the same as it was even 15 years ago. $100,000 a year goes pretty far and you can have a great lifestyle, but it isn't what it used to be. I would say I'm actually surprised that Houston isn't higher on the six figure salary numbers, but it may be that there are LOTS of people that make 75,000 to 99,000 a year in Houston, that don't fall into this category, but it is equivelent to someone making six figures in many of the other cities listed.
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Old 08-23-2010, 08:03 AM
 
Location: La Isla Encanta, Puerto Rico
1,167 posts, read 3,179,318 times
Reputation: 1414
Default I second that - upstream professionals in engergy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Oildog View Post
Thaqt pay is good for the upstream (drilling) jobs. I know a guy who went from the downstream (where I foolishly am) to upstream and they bumped him 20% in salary, and his signature authority went up by a factor of 10.
Bingo - Petroleum and FACILITY engineers. I work for an energy company that does a lot of things and we have a three page help-wanted list on our internal and external employment website for them. We have an overabundance of Chem E's and Mech E-types in downstream refining operations and a program to retraining them for upstream petroleum-E and drilling ops. I think a lot of young folks have the impression that the BP deepwater Gulf disaster will put a damper on this profession. I think it's quite the opposite. There will be a much greater demand for due diligence and perfect design and execution of wildcat drilling operations as well as production facillities. These platforms cost in the BILLIONS (not a misprint) and the need for skilled facillity engineers to make them work super-reliably in extremely harsh conditions is vast. Also, the shale-gas play onshore is basically a very technically-demanding process requiring lots of geological and production-engineering tricks to coax oil and (mainly) gas out of very tight shales through complex artificially "fracing" (fracturing with very high pressure water flow and propping open the cracks with coarse sand) the formation and possibly following the bed with horizontal wellbores. Not for the faint at heart or low-tech old-fashioned drilling technology.

Also, overseas the only prospective blocks the increasingly knowledgeable government petroleum agencies are leasing are those with some sort of intractable technical difficulties such as very deep water, high overpressure, hot plastic salt that keeps flowing into the wellbore, icebergs, permafrost, high toxic sulfur content to the oil, super-deep drill depths that fries the electronics of the measuring devices , I could go on and on. If you can get through school for a masters in Petroleum Engineering with an A-B average (or even another type of E with a willingness to do a little more on-the-job "paying your dues" out in the field in well-ops), Geology, or Geolphysics, and do well in the training programs and first couple of project assignments, you'll be making 100,000+ in 5 years almost guaranteed. Actually, real PE's are making close to that right out of university and have a good chance of making that in a couple of years.
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Old 08-23-2010, 06:20 PM
 
1,575 posts, read 2,907,475 times
Reputation: 1977
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Stats 101 and CommonSense 101

Most ultra-high incomes/net worths anywhere are not based upon silly salaries

Manhattan's financial industry is built upon puny base salaries and massive cash and equity bonuses for 20 and 30-something yo kids (and their elders)

SiliconValley's wealthiest engineers all have puny salaries and amassed their net worths by equity comp at then-start-ups like google, etc

Houston and Dallas' energy industries pay handsomely on scale of Corporate America, but major wealth is always derived by clever guys who are early employees at some energy start-up like an XTO or an energy hedge fund like Centaurus, not old-line, sclerotic cos. like Exxon (or Microsoft of last 10yrs or Google of last 3 yrs)

Consider that Centaurus' 35 yo founder earns more in one yr than Exxon's 55yo CEO has in total net worth...
Did you read the article? It had nothing to do with ultra-high net worth individuals...
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