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Old 02-08-2012, 11:07 AM
 
650 posts, read 1,510,482 times
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i want to buy a ticket for a saturday. can someone explain the difference between a concert and a rodeo ticket? i'm interested with rodeo not concert.
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Old 02-08-2012, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Lafayette
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I'm not a big rodeo person but I think if you want to go to the rodeo at night it includes the concert ticket. I don't think you can separate the two. Of course if you want to go to the rodeo and not stay for the show you will beat the traffic anyway. The traffic to/from the rodeo is a nightmare!
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Old 02-08-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Pearland, TX
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here's how it works:

You get tickets for a particular night. The ticket will get you into the venue for three things:

1. You can run around the carnival rides, exhibits, arcade games, livestock shows, trinket kiosks and stuff and eat all kinds of bad-for-you-food.
2. Around 6:30PM (some days earlier, most start at 6:45PM) go into the stadium and sit down. You get to see rodeo stuff like bronc busting, bull riding, barrell racing... whatever "go-rounds" are scheduled.
3. Around 8:30 or 9 PM, they haul all the "rodeo" stuff off the field and wheel out this huge, rotating stage where the concert performance is staged. Then, after the concert's over, you go home or back out to the rides and carnival stuff.

Both the rodeo and the concert are inside Reliant Stadium and you can't separate the two other than to leave when the rodeo is over and not watch the concert. There's no way they could sell tickets to go to the rodeo inside the stadium and then kick some out before the concert. Whatever you do, the ticket to get inside Reliant Stadium for the rodeo, the concert or both is the same price.

Ronnie

Last edited by HoustonRonnie; 02-08-2012 at 12:09 PM..
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Old 02-08-2012, 01:09 PM
 
650 posts, read 1,510,482 times
Reputation: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoustonRonnie View Post
here's how it works:

You get tickets for a particular night. The ticket will get you into the venue for three things:

1. You can run around the carnival rides, exhibits, arcade games, livestock shows, trinket kiosks and stuff and eat all kinds of bad-for-you-food.
2. Around 6:30PM (some days earlier, most start at 6:45PM) go into the stadium and sit down. You get to see rodeo stuff like bronc busting, bull riding, barrell racing... whatever "go-rounds" are scheduled.
3. Around 8:30 or 9 PM, they haul all the "rodeo" stuff off the field and wheel out this huge, rotating stage where the concert performance is staged. Then, after the concert's over, you go home or back out to the rides and carnival stuff.

Both the rodeo and the concert are inside Reliant Stadium and you can't separate the two other than to leave when the rodeo is over and not watch the concert. There's no way they could sell tickets to go to the rodeo inside the stadium and then kick some out before the concert. Whatever you do, the ticket to get inside Reliant Stadium for the rodeo, the concert or both is the same price.

Ronnie

tnx ronnie.. so if the ticket says 3:45 i assume the concert is 3:45..

when would the rodeo start and end?
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Old 02-08-2012, 01:19 PM
 
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hi ronnie, i saw this at the website.

does this mean the concert starts after there rodeos?

if yes, about how many hours is the rodeo before the concert?



Order of Events


Monday – Friday performances begin at 6:45 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday performances begin at 3:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 18 performance begins at 3:30 p.m.
Click on a heading to expand content
Grand Entry
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/ge.jpg (broken link)
Grand Entry is the exciting opening to each and every RODEOHOUSTON performance. When the gate opens and Show officials appear on horseback, the performance has officially begun. The winding trail of horses, buggies, carriages, hay wagons and fire trucks, brings a colorful exhibition of Show officials, dignitaries, sponsors, volunteers and special guests to RODEOHOUSTON fans nightly.


National Anthem Salute - Sponsored by Coca Cola and Kroger
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/coke/CocaCola_COKE_RSF.gif (broken link)
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/kroger/kroger_new.jpg (broken link)
Reliant Stadium bursts with patriotic pride at each and every performance as the bombs burst through the air during the breathtaking presentation of the “Star Spangled Banner.” This spectacular lighting and indoor fireworks display highlights the Show’s salute to the United States Flag.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/nicki.jpg (broken link)


Tie-Down Roping
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/tdr.jpg (broken link)
Long before tie-down roping (formerly calf roping) became a popular sport in professional rodeo, cowboys were using their lariats as a necessity on the ranch. Sick or injured calves had to be caught so that they could receive proper medicine and treatment.
While the objective of tie-down roping as a sport is different than on the range, the factors for success are the same – an experienced cowboy that is precise with a lasso and teamwork between horse and rider.
Each roper begins behind a barrier that allows the calf a running head start. Once out of the box, the roper’s horse begins a quick pursuit to give the cowboy an optimal position to rope the calf. After catching the calf, the roper will quickly dismount his horse while the horse maintains tension on the rope. Following the rope to the calf, the cowboy tosses the calf to the ground and ties any three of its legs, usually two hind feet and one front foot.
When the tie is secure, the roper throws his hands in the air as a signal to the flag judge. He then remounts his horse and rides toward the calf to remove the tension in the rope. The calf must remain tied for six seconds after the rope is slack or the cowboy receives a “no time.”
Additionally, if the cowboy and his horse break the barrier at the beginning of the event, 10 seconds are added to the time. In an event that separates champions by mere fractions of a second, such a penalty can knock a cowboy out of placing in the prize money.


Bareback Riding - Sponsored by Chevron
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/chevron/logo_chevron.jpg (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/bb.jpg (broken link)

Bareback riding is a demanding rodeo event that combines a strong arm and an even stronger sense of balance and control. With only one hand, the rider grips the “rigging,” a leather handhold tied behind the horse’s front legs, and uses his skill and agility to ride the bronc for eight seconds.
Coming out of the chute, the rider must have his feet above the break of the horse’s shoulder until the horse’s front feet hit the arena ground for the first time. The rider is disqualified and receives no score if he fails to do this or if his free hand comes into contact with the horse, himself or rigging at any time during the ride.
Once out of the chute, the rider should move in time with the bronc’s jumps by continuing the spurring motion with his dull rowel spurs. As the bronc bucks, the rider pulls his knees up, pulling the spurs to the point of the horse’s shoulders. As the horse descends, the rider straightens his legs, placing his feet back over the horse’s shoulder in anticipation of the next jump.
The judges score both the horse and rider, looking at the horse’s bucking action and the cowboy’s spurring technique. The judges also look for the rider’s willingness to lean far back on the horse and adjust to the horse’s action.



Team Roping - Sponsored by Mrs Bairds and KHOU
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/mrsbairds/logo_mrsbairds.gif (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/khou/logo_khou.png (broken link) Team roping is truly a team event from every aspect — teamwork between horse and rider and teamwork between two ropers. Success in this event is dependent on the skills of both cowboys.
The first roper, called the header, waits behind a barrier while the steer is given a head start. The header pursues the steer and must rope it with one of three legal catches — around both horns, around one horn and the head, or around the neck. Any other catch by the header is considered illegal and the team is disqualified. If the header breaks the barrier coming out of the starting box, the team is given a 10-second penalty.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/tr.jpg (broken link)
After the header makes his catch and dallies his rope, he must change the direction of the steer to position its legs for his partner, the heeler. The heeler must rope both of the steer’s hind legs while being careful not to catch the front feet. If he catches only one hind foot, the team is assessed a five-second penalty. The clock is stopped after the steer is caught, there is no slack left in the ropes and the horses are facing one another.



Saddle Bronc Riding - Sponsored by Aflac
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/aflsm.jpg (broken link) One of the most difficult events to learn and one of the most rhythmic events to watch, saddle bronc riding is considered rodeo’s “classic event”– evolving from the ranch work of breaking and training horses.
Many cowboys say that bronc riding is the most difficult roughstock event to master because of its stringent technical requirements. The rider holds onto a soft, woven riding rein attached to the horse’s halter and sits in a specially-made saddle with a sheepskin lining.
With the first jump out of the chute, the rider must “mark out” – his feet must touch the horse’s shoulders on the first jump. The rider is disqualified and receives a “no score” if he misses the mark out.
[CENTER]http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/sb.jpg (broken link)[/CENTER]


Steer Wrestling - Sponsored by Mattress Firm
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/mattressfirm/logo_mattressfirm_ns.png (broken link) Steer wrestling, also known as bulldogging, began in the early 1900s with the legendary Bill Picket. Since then, it has become the quickest event in rodeo. Using only leverage and strength, the “bulldogger” (steer wrestler) stops a 450-750 lb. steer and wrestles it to the ground.
The steer wrestler begins this event atop his horse behind a barrier. A second cowboy, called a hazer, sits ready on horseback on the opposite side of the steer and will prevent the steer from veering away from the contestant during the run. After the steer is given a head start, the steer wrestler and hazer chase the steer on their horses, one on each side, until the steer wrestler is in position to dismount onto the racing steer.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/sw.jpg (broken link)
Once in position, the steer wrestler slides from his saddle and reaches for the steer’s horns. Proper leverage is a key as the contestant hooks his arms around the steer’s horns and digs his heels into the arena dirt to stop the steer and bring it to the ground.
The contestant’s time is declared when the steer is on its side with all four legs pointing in the same direction. As in other timed events, a 10-second penalty is added for breaking the start barrier.


Bull Riding - Sponsored by Taco Bell
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/tacobell/TacoBell.JPG (broken link) Whether it is the thrill of seeing man versus beast or the excitement of watching finely tuned athletes on the roughest rides of their lives, rodeo fans love bull riding and have made it one of rodeo's most popular events.
A challenging event requiring balance, control and a strong arm, bull riding matches man against animal with the ultimate goal being a successful eight-second ride. The bull rider uses a flat-braided rope with a single hand-hold that is pulled tight behind the bull’s shoulders and held fast by the cowboy’s riding hand. The cowboy must stay on the bull using only one hand on the rope. A weighted bell attached to this rope hangs underneath the bull and falls free from the animal at the end of the ride.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/bullr.jpg (broken link)
With the bull spinning, turning and kicking, the cowboy isn’t required to spur but will often move his dull rowel spurs along the bull to maintain contact and balance. Spurring to accommodate the bull’s bucking style and to increase control will add points to the contestant’s score.
The rider is disqualified if his free hand touches the bull or himself during the ride or the rider hits the ground before the eight-second buzzer. As in all roughstock events, the bull’s bucking efforts account for half the rider’s score.


Chuck Wagon Races
Sponsored by Ford, The New 93Q, IW Marks, Kroger, Chevron and Randalls
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/ford.jpg (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/93q/logo_KKBQ.png (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/iwmarks/iwmarks.jpg (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/kroger/kroger_new.jpg (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/chevron/logo_chevron.jpg (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/randalls/Randalls-best.gif (broken link)
With the sound of a whistle, every heart in Reliant Stadium leaps along with those hard-running ponies! Known for its tight turns at fast speeds, the chuck wagon races are a favorite at RODEOHOUSTON™.
Often called the “mess wagon,” the chuck wagon, so called because it carried the “chuck” — spuds, flour, beans and coffee — was a traveling cafeteria for cowboys on the range in the days of the Old West. Invented by pioneer rancher Charles Goodnight, the chuck wagon was the heart of any outfit. This canvas-topped wagon was more than just a place to eat; it was the locker room, a post office and a social club.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/cw.jpg (broken link)
The camp cook was always the first to strike out toward the next stop. When traveling back and forth became boring and tedious, the rugged cowboys decided to race their wagons. The last to arrive was to pay for the first round at the town saloon — perhaps the real reason for organizing this rangeland derby. Traveling was more than just a journey; it was now a competition between the chuck wagon drivers.
Today, these chuck wagons race for entertainment. Unwritten rules require the lead driver to move his team to the outside portion of the track, giving up the inside lane so other teams can catch up. Pulled by specially bred teams of ponies, these lightweight chuck wagons perform in ways the ranch wagon never could.
Now one of the most popular events at the Rodeo, the miniature chuck wagon races feature teams racing up to 30 miles an hour, sometimes on two wheels, around the Reliant Stadium floor while the crowd of thousands cheer on their pick.


Calf Scramble - Sponsored by Justin Boots and Clear Channel Outdoor
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/justin/Justin_JustinBoot_CS.gif (broken link)

http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/clearchl/cco_4c.jpg (broken link) The line of distinctive red-and white-shirted competitors files into Reliant Stadium in grim determination. One of the wildest, most spirited and extremely heartwarming events at RODEOHOUSTON is about to begin! With the drop of a hat, 14 calves race away from 28 youngsters armed with only a rope halter and a dream. Spectators look on in awe as the group of Texas 4-H and FFA members pursue their dream. With kids and calves scattered about and darting in every direction across the Reliant Stadium floor, the Calf Scramble becomes one of the most chaotic, unscripted events of RODEOHOUSTON.
http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/cs.jpg (broken link)


Barrel Racing - Sponsored by TransCanada
Sponsored By
http://www.rodeohouston.com/about/sponsors/images/logos/transcanada/transcanada.jpg (broken link) Barrel racing is an event of pure precision and teamwork between horse and rider and a display of horsemanship skills in which timing is everything. Over the years, barrel racing has evolved into a multimillion dollar sport supported by the Professional Women’s Barrel Racing.
Entering the arena at full speed, the horse and rider must complete a cloverleaf pattern around the barrels to either the left or right. Any deviation from the pattern results in disqualification. Precision turns at a high rate of speed are essential for success in this timed event. Because of the speed in this event, times are measured in hundredths of a second by electronic timers.
With the tight turns, occasionally a barrel is knocked over. Riders may attempt to keep the barrels upright by touching them since a fallen barrel adds five seconds to the rider’s time.
[CENTER]http://www.rodeohouston.com/rodeo/images/bar.jpg (broken link)[/CENTER]


Mutton Bustin' - Sponsored by State Farm
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Old 02-08-2012, 07:28 PM
 
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How do the cookoff tickets work? Can I sample all the entries somehow?
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Old 02-08-2012, 09:06 PM
 
147 posts, read 334,740 times
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I bought the tickets to see KISS last year. I didn't know that the concerts and rodeo events are combined. This was one of the worst experiences of my life. I had to park a half hours walk away and then sat through 2 hours of rednecks abusing animals. I will never go back.
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Old 02-09-2012, 12:53 AM
 
1,045 posts, read 2,036,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texascrude View Post
How do the cookoff tickets work? Can I sample all the entries somehow?
Well this is different. Most of the cookoff tickets are invites to private tents which happens to be the best part of the rodeo. Free food and booze for those that have passes, and it's a hell of a time. General admission kind of sucks because you can't get into the private tents unless you are a cute girl...
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Old 02-09-2012, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Pearland, TX
3,333 posts, read 8,774,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brom View Post
tnx ronnie.. so if the ticket says 3:45 i assume the concert is 3:45..

when would the rodeo start and end?

If the ticket says 3:45, then the concert starts around 4:30 or so and is over before 8PM. I called the ticket office and confirmed this.

Ronnie
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Old 02-09-2012, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Pearland, TX
3,333 posts, read 8,774,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Krinkle View Post
Well this is different. Most of the cookoff tickets are invites to private tents which happens to be the best part of the rodeo. Free food and booze for those that have passes, and it's a hell of a time. General admission kind of sucks because you can't get into the private tents unless you are a cute girl...

Find somebody who knows somebody that has a team entered, throw some money at them to sponsor, get a sponsor pass with the support donation and then you can get into their tent. We do this every year with my sweetheart's cousin's team.

Ronnie
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