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Old 09-23-2007, 10:59 PM
 
22 posts, read 101,625 times
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is it safe to live in houston? or do you buy a house and it gets blown/flooded down by a hurricane? what are the "odds"of that happening?
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Old 09-24-2007, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
4,678 posts, read 9,263,181 times
Reputation: 1960
Quote:
Originally Posted by why_so_much_racism View Post
is it safe to live in houston? or do you buy a house and it gets blown/flooded down by a hurricane? what are the "odds"of that happening?


Houston sits near the gulf coast, yes. It is possible for Houston to have a hurricane.

check these links...

Office of Emergency Management (http://www.houstontx.gov/oem/hurricane.html - broken link)

Office of Emergency Management (http://www.houstontx.gov/oem/dguide.html - broken link)

Last edited by TXRyan23; 09-24-2007 at 06:48 AM..
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Old 09-24-2007, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Clear Lake, Houston TX
8,373 posts, read 29,043,919 times
Reputation: 4701
The last time we got a hurricane worth mentioning was 1983 (Alicia). This was a Category 3 storm. I was in elementary school and we were huddled up in our boarded up house in Sugar Land. It blew our fences down is all I remember. The house was fine. They usually don't get much stronger than this--the Gulf is shallow around us which usually weakens a mega-hurricane. For example, monster hurricanes Rita and Katrina were Category 3's when they struck. So hurricanes are rare event compared to say FL, but we are by no means immune. We're lucky. The main issue Houston has to worry about is flooding from tropical storms & depressions. Floods are mostly localized, and generally the less desirable areas to live flood badly in thunderstorms. That said, there were several parts of town that were untouched by even Tropical storm Allison.
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:49 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,702 posts, read 17,385,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
The last time we got a hurricane worth mentioning was 1983 (Alicia). This was a Category 3 storm. I was in elementary school and we were huddled up in our boarded up house in Sugar Land. It blew our fences down is all I remember. The house was fine. They usually don't get much stronger than this--the Gulf is shallow around us which usually weakens a mega-hurricane. For example, monster hurricanes Rita and Katrina were Category 3's when they struck. So hurricanes are rare event compared to say FL, but we are by no means immune. We're lucky. The main issue Houston has to worry about is flooding from tropical storms & depressions. Floods are mostly localized, and generally the less desirable areas to live flood badly in thunderstorms. That said, there were several parts of town that were untouched by even Tropical storm Allison.
Using that same reasoning "the Gulf is shallow" means that the Gulf Coast gets worse storm surges than Florida which means a heck of a lot more damage in those areas than are prone to storm surge. Even for small storms.

Yes, Houston can get hurricanes and they can be quite devastating. Rita was pretty bad for the folks that experienced it and many are still trying to recover a year later, I am only glad it missed Houston as the damage would have been very bad. Alicia (barely a Cat 3) in 1983 sank the whole neighborhood of Brownwood in Baytown (it is now a wetlands park), flooded Seabrook, Kemah, and other areas which have now become heavily developed and caused the power to be out for a week to two weeks in some parts of the Houston metro area. There were a number of damaged homes, trees, businesses, etc.

Point is, every region in the country has its own type of threat from natural disaster whether it be wild fires, earthquakes, flooding, etc. a person should do their homework, understand the natural (and unnatural threats like crime) and buy wisely in the region they choose to live in.
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Old 09-24-2007, 11:54 AM
 
443 posts, read 1,713,341 times
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Worry more about the flooding. Houston floods if I pee too long
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Old 09-24-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Location: God's Country
22,525 posts, read 32,452,084 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayor_McCheese View Post
Worry more about the flooding. Houston floods if I pee too long
Now that is funny, but just about true. It doesn't take much for certain areas to flood.
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Old 09-24-2007, 12:22 PM
 
107 posts, read 548,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayor_McCheese View Post
Worry more about the flooding. Houston floods if I pee too long
Too true. That's why we have so many trucks and SUVs around here!
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Old 09-26-2007, 07:17 AM
 
Location: FL/TX Coasts
1,464 posts, read 3,913,345 times
Reputation: 433
it will take one hurricane to make things as they are in Florida currently. Home insurance will change for good.
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Old 09-26-2007, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Hutto, Tx
9,247 posts, read 24,993,683 times
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All I can say is, look at all the Hurricanes forming in the Gulf and notice that none of them have come here. Even that little bitty thing that hit a few weeks ago didn't do much of anything. Yes, Rita did damage, but that was more towards Louisiana. Didn't affect Houston. 1983 was the last doozer one for the Houston/Freeport/Lake Jackson area (Where I lived at the time)
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Old 09-26-2007, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Houston
960 posts, read 2,592,123 times
Reputation: 872
The odds are 99% likely to happen. It’s inevitable. Earth is not sustainable with so many car on Katy Freeway.
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