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Old 08-12-2012, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Republic of Texas
988 posts, read 1,204,531 times
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My vote is for a good quality engineered hardwood, glued down. I do not advocate floating a floor ever. My $0.02.
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Old 08-12-2012, 08:26 PM
 
2,480 posts, read 7,146,025 times
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True hardwood floors don't due well in Houston's humid climate.

We have engineered hardwood floors and you can't tell they aren't true hard wood. Engineered hardwood floors do NOT equal laminate wood floors.

Laminate floors would hurt value of a home more than tile.

IMO, in order of preference:

Engineered hardwood
Tile
Laminate
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Old 08-12-2012, 09:07 PM
 
42 posts, read 78,664 times
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Thanks for the great information. I would like to have the same wood floor throughout the downstairs, including the kitchen and will look at the bamboo product John mentioned. John, or anyone, did you ever spill or have a large puddle of water in the kitchen with no ill effect? That is my only worry--that something would leak or spill and ruin the floor, even the engineered wood. That would be the reason I might consider stone in the kitchen, but I would rather have one flooring throughout.
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Old 08-12-2012, 09:51 PM
 
Location: The Greater Houston Metro Area
9,053 posts, read 17,212,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Karoe View Post
Thanks for the great information. I would like to have the same wood floor throughout the downstairs, including the kitchen and will look at the bamboo product John mentioned. John, or anyone, did you ever spill or have a large puddle of water in the kitchen with no ill effect? That is my only worry--that something would leak or spill and ruin the floor, even the engineered wood. That would be the reason I might consider stone in the kitchen, but I would rather have one flooring throughout.
Kitchens - an dishwasher mishap could happen, etc. - I would recommend tile there. Same for baths.
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:13 AM
 
5,976 posts, read 15,286,462 times
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Default My 2 cents...

Quote:
Originally Posted by testmo View Post
true hardwood floors do have a lot of problems in the Houston climate. engineered hardwood can actually be quite more durable, does better with expansion and contraction, and does way better with humidity. i wouldn't risk putting in hardwood and then have to rip out and redo a few years or less down the road.
I have engineered maple floors in one house, the engineered floors look, well, engineered. They look nice, but too perfect, too glossy. I noticed after a section got water logged because of a spill, that the edges changed color somewhat, and also expanded and never went down, so the seams are a bit raised, and discolored. In another house I own which is 102 years old, the heart pine floors look great. So people will not need to rip out real hardwood floors after a few years unless they want a change. Most of the really old homes in the Houston area have hardwood floors exposed to the moist air (block/pier and beam foundations), and have for over a century, so there is not a problem with hardwood floors and Houston climate; the houses were built with that in mind. Also, real hardwood floors will also expand, but they go back down once the moisture is dried, and they do not discolor.

One last note... if you do put in engineered floors on concrete and you have to replace, or repair it, you will most likely sell the house before doing it! Have you ever tried to get a glued plank off concrete?! Talk about a disaster. If on second floor, probably not an issue since you will fasten it to a subfloor.

Last edited by HookTheBrotherUp; 08-13-2012 at 06:32 AM..
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:21 AM
 
2,277 posts, read 3,964,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HookTheBrotherUp View Post
One last note... if you do put in engineered floors on concrete and you have to replace, or repair it, you will most likely sell the house before doing it! Have you ever tried to get a glued plank off concrete?! Talk about a disaster. If on second floor, probably not an issue since you will fasten it to a subfloor.
To answer your rhetorical question, yes ive had to pull up glued down engineered floors and I cursed the person they did it the entire time (as they splintered apart layer by layer) When I redid the floors, I went with a floating setup and have been very pleased with the results. Yes, there are soft spots due to unevenness, but it's a small price to pay for beig able to do the instalation myself as opposed to hiring someone to do glue down. I love having hardwood floors. I can't believe people actually enthused over wall to wall carpeting. Hardwoods and rugs are so much better.
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:33 AM
 
Location: plano
7,892 posts, read 11,427,262 times
Reputation: 7811
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karoe View Post
Thanks for the great information. I would like to have the same wood floor throughout the downstairs, including the kitchen and will look at the bamboo product John mentioned. John, or anyone, did you ever spill or have a large puddle of water in the kitchen with no ill effect? That is my only worry--that something would leak or spill and ruin the floor, even the engineered wood. That would be the reason I might consider stone in the kitchen, but I would rather have one flooring throughout.
Sure we spilled large liquids on it occasionally with no impacts what so ever. That is part of the test consumer reports conducted to find the best wood for a kitchen. You do not want to leave the water on the floor a long time before cleaning it up. Remember bamboo grows in water so it is one of the best wood products for water or liquid. this flooring does better than most in not dinting if something heavy is dropped on it. Read consumer reports if you have access to get the brand names that were best wood floors for a kitchen situation. A couple of different brands scored well in the 2009 time period when they published the test results. PM me if you want the brand names.

One other point, this product did not look engineered someone would have to pay alot of attention to it to notice. The keys are several different length of plank, not a glossy or un natural looking wood finish and the patterns of grain were not repeating themselves as this is s true wood (bamboo) veneer.

I should add, tile is clearly more functional for a kitchen than any wood, but we too wanted as much of the same floor look with wood as we could and this is how we ended up with the bamboo prduct.

Last edited by Johnhw2; 08-13-2012 at 08:00 AM..
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:50 AM
 
131 posts, read 537,691 times
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By the time you damage wood flooring in your kitchen with water, you'd have also damaged your wood cabinets. So I think they're perfectly fine in the kitchen (yes, I've also lived with wood floors in a kitchen before).
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Old 08-15-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: with my mom
66 posts, read 117,922 times
Reputation: 58
you broke mofos with your cheap wood, tile, or laminate...next you'll be telling everyone you do your own yardwork. trolol.
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Old 10-24-2013, 02:26 PM
 
3 posts, read 4,268 times
Reputation: 10
Hi Guys,
I deal with this almost everyday being a builder and investor. The best solution for any house to get the best look and get most resale value in Houston would be to have engineered wood throughout living spaces and formal living areas including hallways and entry. Some people even put wood in bedrooms and Master. But to save money you can leave bedrooms with carpet. Put Ceramic tile in baths and kitchen which are your wet areas.

If you are looking for extremely good prices and free estimate you should contact Shans Carpets on Gulf Freeway. They have been excellent with quality and service at wholesale prices.

Thanks...try not to have too many different floors in on site of vision.
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