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Old 10-07-2007, 07:25 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,425 times
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i am an L.A. native considering moving to Houston or surrounding area. i have done some research and like houston so far for it's diversity and schools but it keeps coming up just under L.A. on the "most polluted cities" lists . now i know that it can't get much worse than here but are there any parts of houston i should avoid , any areas around houston that are cleaner. i have 3 children and was hoping to improve our quality of life. any insight and names of specific towns or counties would be appreciated we are looking forward to a change but just want to make the right choice. also any school districts in the area that might mirror the diversity, education, and arts programs that we have now in culver city, ca. i have seen people say "don't move if you have it made in L.A." and in a lot of ways i feel we do but truthfully we are a bit tired of the rat race and can NEVER hope to buy a house out here in cali. open to suggestions for all parts of texas
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Old 10-07-2007, 09:37 PM
 
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Read my posts...i`m moving from OC to The Woodlands....i call it too the Rat Race!
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Old 10-07-2007, 09:41 PM
 
Location: southern california
61,281 posts, read 83,008,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villagekids3 View Post
i am an L.A. native considering moving to Houston or surrounding area. i have done some research and like houston so far for it's diversity and schools but it keeps coming up just under L.A. on the "most polluted cities" lists . now i know that it can't get much worse than here but are there any parts of houston i should avoid , any areas around houston that are cleaner. i have 3 children and was hoping to improve our quality of life. any insight and names of specific towns or counties would be appreciated we are looking forward to a change but just want to make the right choice. also any school districts in the area that might mirror the diversity, education, and arts programs that we have now in culver city, ca. i have seen people say "don't move if you have it made in L.A." and in a lot of ways i feel we do but truthfully we are a bit tired of the rat race and can NEVER hope to buy a house out here in cali. open to suggestions for all parts of texas
when i left houston in 71 it was polluted. so not much there goin on.
definition of pollution. drive a convertible for 2 hrs near lake houston and come back with welts on your face and arms. they killed all the crabs at lynchberg ferry man, it used to be full of crabs and fish. bummer. chemical plants.
stephen s
san diego ca
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Old 10-07-2007, 11:45 PM
 
1 posts, read 7,400 times
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Default Smog isn't as bad

I am a native houstonian who now lives in L.A. I have a few suggestions for you based on what I know about Houston and what I know about Culver City. As far as pollution, Houston and L.A. are pretty equal, however, it does not seem near as bad in Houston- I rarely noticed smog in Houston whereas sometimes smog make the L.A. skyline invisible. The worst part of Houston, pollution wise, would be the east side areas such as Pasadena. The east side is not that desirable anyways.

It will be hard to match the diversity of culver city (and still live in a safe, nice part of Houston) but you definitely what to look in Houston proper opposed to the suburban areas. The suburban areas are nice but diverse is the last thing that comes to mind when I think suburban Houston. I would recommend Mid town, the Heights, and west Houston in the area surrounding the Galleria. It is hard to tell you specifically what areas to look in because I don't know alot about what your looking for...but that would give you an idea where to start. Houston actually has alot of diversity and culture but I am not familiar enough with the neighborhoods, schools, etc. to make really specific recommendations. I personally think Houston and L.A. are more similar than most people realize- both are huge, spread out, traffic nightmares, and have alot to do.
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Old 10-08-2007, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Clear Lake, Houston TX
8,373 posts, read 29,301,692 times
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I visited LA this spring and have never seen smog so thick, and never had it burn my eyes and nose so terribly!!! I'd say Orange County was pretty similar to Houston, though. I think Houston is #6 in the top 10 cities for 2007 by some poll.

Summertime here can get pretty stagnant but in the spring, winter and fall the cold fronts blow all that bad air out and it can be San Diego-clean and clear (for 1-2 days at a time anyway).

I'd avoid the Baytown-Pasadena-Clear Lake-Texas City line of suburbs and anywhere closeby. There are chemical plants all over the place. Now before someone says "there are no chemical plants in Clear Lake" I'll say that's true. But with plants to the north & east (Pasadena & Baytown) and plants to the south (TX City), the wind is almost always blowing the emissions over the area. You can look at NOAA weather history maps and it will show that area builds up pollution faster and denser than the rest of the city.

And it's true - I live in the Clear Lake area. On really bad summer days I go outside for 10 minutes, come back inside and have to change my shirt because it smells like burned chemicals.
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:35 AM
 
Location: A little suburb of Houston
3,702 posts, read 17,503,777 times
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The EPA has set 5 major categories for air pollution. LA exceeds the limits in 3 of these. Houston only exceeds the limits in one of these, Ozone. Strangely (or really not so strangely), the air monitors in Houston that have the most alarms for high readings in Ozone are located on the Southwest side of town, particularly those in the Chimney Rock area. This is not to say others don't have bad or high readings but the ones on that side of town usually ring in with the worst ozone.

Houston is actually one of the most monitored cities in the US, even more so than LA. The TCEQ, Harris County, City of Houston, and Houston Regional Monitoring Network (sponsored by industry) have monitors all over the place. A lot of data can be found here: Daily Summary Report By Site - Texas Commission on Environmental Quality - www.tceq.state.tx.us
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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statistically Houston should be below LA, LA is 3rd biggest city, Houston is 4th.
I don't know how to escape the pollution if that what your wondering. There is pollution in every big city.
Or Irving, Plano, Garland, or Arlington in the Dallas metro might even float your boat if you're looking for diversity or Sugar Land in Houston.
I would recommend Austin because its is diverse but probably has less of a pollution problem. If your really crazy about big cities though and love the ocean like many Californians do... Houston or Sugar Land is the place for you.
If not the ocean I might throw San Antonio, Austin, or DFW in the mix.
Austin however is not a Gainormous city.
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Houston
88 posts, read 291,361 times
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It's not as bad, noticeably, even if there are some of highest emissions of pollutants in the U.S. here (specifically the East to South-East side of town where the port and petrochemical complexes reside like mentioned in posts above). The mountains and valleys that people adore so much in Los Angeles and Mexico City naturally act as hats making the pollution denser and incapable of dissipating like it can here. The pollution is here, it's just not going to be what you're expecting and used to over there. Houston is very much like Los Angeles though (especially the LA of the 1960s) except very lush. You need to visit the city. Now is a great time due to the heat lightening up. CMDallas, LA is the second largest municipality now passing Chicago in the late '80s followed then by Houston, just to clear that up.
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