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Old 12-05-2012, 10:57 AM
 
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Considering the make up of the city, the low cost living for a major metro area, the rising wages and the development expansion, why isn't Houston on the verge of becoming a true rival to the NY/LA?

More wealth is streaming into the city than ever before while in LA (where I am in now) you can see there is a brain drain of top talent leaving the city for greener grass, and it's all growing in TX.

I've heard from people in business in Houston who attend business council/chamber meetings that there is a bit of a divide between those transplant business owners from NY/LA that are pushing for Houston's inner loop to resemble the towns they left and the older guard that think that attracting more business means being more family friendly, building more along the town centre model with chain stores that you see out in the Woodlands or Sugarland. Is this true?

I do not mind there being both but as far as the inner loop goes, it should remain an eclectic vibrant escape from the burbs, not development project to make it more "burbish". That's just my opinion. I don't want this thread to turn into some burbs vs the city thread but one that actually informs me on what is going on in my hometown.

I really want to return if the rumors are true about the city growing and a hotbed for young upwardly mobile professionals. I would like to move smack dab in the thick of the growth too. Where should one move? Would it be worth giving up the opportunities in Los Angeles?

Need advice. Thanks guys!
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:11 AM
 
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Well, you know where I stand on this. Look, I think LA is a great place to "live". If I were a loaded artist of any stripe that woke up at noon, bummed around the house for a few hours. Grabbed a cup of java at the local bistro and surfed the net for 3 hours, spend a few hours working on my screenplay then off to meet friends for dinner and drinks. Nothing beats LA for that. Nothing. And don't kid yourself, I just described 80% of artistic community in LA. But for the rest of us who don't work in entertainment, are not already loaded and have to work in a profession that is not entertainment, Houston beats LA hands down. Heck don't think I haven't thought of working in the entertainment industry just to move there. It's crossed my mind. But would I want to work in any other field out there? No. So assuming you do not work in the entertainment field, Houston is the winner. Where to live in Houston? There are 500 threads that state very clearly, live CLOSE to where you WORK. LOL.
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:17 AM
 
15,369 posts, read 20,744,958 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarcelonaFan View Post
Considering the make up of the city, the low cost living for a major metro area, the rising wages and the development expansion, why isn't Houston on the verge of becoming a true rival to the NY/LA?
Rival on what?
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:18 AM
 
235 posts, read 310,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarcelonaFan View Post
Considering the make up of the city, the low cost living for a major metro area, the rising wages and the development expansion, why isn't Houston on the verge of becoming a true rival to the NY/LA?

More wealth is streaming into the city than ever before while in LA (where I am in now) you can see there is a brain drain of top talent leaving the city for greener grass, and it's all growing in TX.

I've heard from people in business in Houston who attend business council/chamber meetings that there is a bit of a divide between those transplant business owners from NY/LA that are pushing for Houston's inner loop to resemble the towns they left and the older guard that think that attracting more business means being more family friendly, building more along the town centre model with chain stores that you see out in the Woodlands or Sugarland. Is this true?

I do not mind there being both but as far as the inner loop goes, it should remain an eclectic vibrant escape from the burbs, not development project to make it more "burbish". That's just my opinion. I don't want this thread to turn into some burbs vs the city thread but one that actually informs me on what is going on in my hometown.

I really want to return if the rumors are true about the city growing and a hotbed for young upwardly mobile professionals. I would like to move smack dab in the thick of the growth too. Where should one move? Would it be worth giving up the opportunities in Los Angeles?

Need advice. Thanks guys!
Houston really needs to improve its infrastructure. It really is a drag on the quality of life here. That means better transit, better roads (they are terrible), more sidewalks, more street lights, better drainage and more neighborhood parks. The city is very reliant on highways and you can only build so many of them. The haphazard pattern of development and lack of formal planning that the city is known for also needs to be reevaluated given the growth. I doubt such a model is compatible with a high quality of life that long term residents will demand.

The city has historically depended on growth and attracting new residents. Infrastructure investment and other quality of life issues have generally taken a back seat to building new development farther out at cheap prices to attract those new residents and businesses. This, of course, keeps current property owners from seeing the appreciation on their property they could expect to see in other major cities. I see a future clash between the people who have moved here in the past decade or so (and want to see an improvement in the quality of life) and interests in the city that have a vested interest in keeping things cheap and easy.

Even if I'm no longer here, it should be interesting!
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:18 AM
 
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Stay where you are. Your state needs your tax dollars.
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Old 12-05-2012, 11:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jek74 View Post
Well, you know where I stand on this. Look, I think LA is a great place to "live". If I were a loaded artist of any stripe that woke up at noon, bummed around the house for a few hours. Grabbed a cup of java at the local bistro and surfed the net for 3 hours, spend a few hours working on my screenplay then off to meet friends for dinner and drinks. Nothing beats LA for that. Nothing. And don't kid yourself, I just described 80% of artistic community in LA. But for the rest of us who don't work in entertainment, are not already loaded and have to work in a profession that is not entertainment, Houston beats LA hands down. Heck don't think I haven't thought of working in the entertainment industry just to move there. It's crossed my mind. But would I want to work in any other field out there? No. So assuming you do not work in the entertainment field, Houston is the winner. Where to live in Houston? There are 500 threads that state very clearly, live CLOSE to where you WORK. LOL.
I have an interest in the arts but mostly architecture. I want to study architecture/city planning-urban design. In LA there are a lot of opportunities to be a "starchitect".

I am sure in Houston there are some opportunities to pursue this but overall I am looking for vibrancy in my late 20s early 30s. Before I settle down into family life I want to live in a large metro area working a decent job and enjoying the culture and nightlife. I don't want to be judged for going out during the week to bars, shows, art exhibits, cinema screenings, etc.

I am wondering if Houston has adopted that mindset and vibrancy and if the city itself has followed suit developmental wise.

Quote:
Chicken: see a future clash between the people who have moved here in the past decade or so (and want to see an improvement in the quality of life) and interests in the city that have a vested interest in keeping things cheap and easy.
Yes, this is true. It looks like there is a dividing gap between those transplants wanting both the low cost living of Houston with an LA vibrancy, and the good ol' boys that think cheap and family friendly is better business.

I just don't get why the inner city cannot just be for the former and the outskirts for the latter.




Quote:
Rival on what?
Quality of life, large metro area for relatively low cost of living, opportunities, etc. What else?
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:21 PM
 
1,475 posts, read 2,514,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BarcelonaFan View Post
I have an interest in the arts but mostly architecture. I want to study architecture/city planning-urban design. In LA there are a lot of opportunities to be a "starchitect".

I am sure in Houston there are some opportunities to pursue this but overall I am looking for vibrancy in my late 20s early 30s. Before I settle down into family life I want to live in a large metro area working a decent job and enjoying the culture and nightlife. I don't want to be judged for going out during the week to bars, shows, art exhibits, cinema screenings, etc.

I am wondering if Houston has adopted that mindset and vibrancy and if the city itself has followed suit developmental wise.



Yes, this is true. It looks like there is a dividing gap between those transplants wanting both the low cost living of Houston with an LA vibrancy, and the good ol' boys that think cheap and family friendly is better business.

I just don't get why the inner city cannot just be for the former and the outskirts for the latter.






Quality of life, large metro area for relatively low cost of living, opportunities, etc. What else?

I don't know man. If a "starchitect" is connected to the celebrity and entertainment world, you might want to stay out there. All the money out there is in that industry and so any tentacle that is connected to it is going to be able to siphon off money.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:24 PM
 
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Barca,

I don't think it is as much of a suburbs v. inner loop conflict as it is often portrayed. I would suspect that if you polled your average person living in the suburbs they would love to see a functioning, integrated transit system with commuter rail. I would also guess that many in the suburbs would love to see the type of "main street" development in their suburb that one sees in such places as Naperville, IL or Gaithersburg, MD or Bryn Mawr, PA. The Woodlands comes about as close to this type of development as you see in Houston and it is always listed as one of the most desirable places to live in the Houston region.

No, I think the conflict is more between the vast majority of people that would prefer to see improvements in infrastructure and investments in the city to improve the quality of life and certain groups and interests that have a vested interest in continuing the status quo. Unfortunately, the later have a lot of money to back their position and I have learned that in Texas (even more than the country as a whole - well maybe other than Louisiana), money talks.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:27 PM
 
2,720 posts, read 4,961,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jek74 View Post
I don't know man. If a "starchitect" is connected to the celebrity and entertainment world, you might want to stay out there. All the money out there is in that industry and so any tentacle that is connected to it is going to be able to siphon off money.
No not really. A starchitect is more of a guy who works for a big name firm and works on big name projects. Doesn't have to be associated with celebs.

Most of the big starchitects are in Europe or out East working in Dubai and Shangai.

That's a pipe dream though. I am just wanting a career. I just want to live and work and go to school in a city that has a deep vibrancy, eclectic atmosphere, always energetic and pretty liberal. I know Houston is a conservative town but from the looks at the growth of the inner city and the number of transplants from CA and the northeast it seems like it should be developing into a hub for what I want.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:30 PM
 
235 posts, read 310,345 times
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Houston is definitely not liberal.
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