U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-24-2021, 07:00 PM
 
4 posts, read 2,123 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

Hi. Was hoping to hear from people who did the comparison already.

We are not Americans and we are pretty mobile.

We are still in the process of reading up. Ok make that - we are yet to start reading up.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-26-2021, 01:10 PM
 
62 posts, read 47,004 times
Reputation: 52
Why private vs public?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2021, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Houston and Old Katy
567 posts, read 1,532,097 times
Reputation: 411
Why not if you can afford that kind of $$$?

Some can't drop $20k-30k per kid per year, and others can. I fall in the ranks of can't(s). But when I worked overseas, the company paid for top private school and it was really nice for kids to experience a private IB school, but in Houston it's back to the public schools.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2021, 02:56 PM
 
62 posts, read 47,004 times
Reputation: 52
Why not? Because I think kids are better served by public schools.

Being exposed to socioeconomic diversity is important to raising a grounded child, and I doubt college or life outcomes are any better at a private school vs a top public school.

I was raised in a very well-to-do family but I'm glad I never went the private school route. When you get into the real world, you have to learn to interact with those from every walk of life.

I understand private schools serve a different function overseas, especially in places with a large number of expats. But given the OP is not an American, I just want to make sure he/she's explored that route before just assuming private school is the way to go.

Last edited by Waffleton; 08-26-2021 at 03:05 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2021, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Houston and Old Katy
567 posts, read 1,532,097 times
Reputation: 411
OP may be an Expat, didn't clarify. If they are so mobile that they can either go to AWTY or John Cooper, they are probably not in Houston yet. I am sure between the 2 they will do OK.

But yes, you get alot more diversity in public school. You will not get that in those 2 schools, no matter how they present themselves. I grew up poor, but excelled in public school, got to college, have decent job, but can't afford this level of expense for my kids, so didn't even consider them. I moved to better school disteict when kids were little instead.

I noticed that even best public schools still somewhat teach to lower level or median kids. My 2 kids are fairly unchallenged, so we spend alot time with them outside to make sure they are not just idling through school.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2021, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Houston
939 posts, read 1,802,135 times
Reputation: 1483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waffleton View Post
Why not? Because I think kids are better served by public schools.

Being exposed to socioeconomic diversity is important to raising a grounded child, and I doubt college or life outcomes are any better at a private school vs a top public school.

I was raised in a very well-to-do family but I'm glad I never went the private school route. When you get into the real world, you have to learn to interact with those from every walk of life.

I understand private schools serve a different function overseas, especially in places with a large number of expats. But given the OP is not an American, I just want to make sure he/she's explored that route before just assuming private school is the way to go.
Bunk. What kind of twisted psychology holds that going to a private school 'un-grounds" a student? I went to public school in Nashville 1 thru 9, and then the best private school in the state for 10 thru 12, Montgomery Bell Academy. Once I got through calculus I and II at UT-Chattanooga, Vanderbilt let me in for my last 3 college years. Wouldn't have happened without my private school years. No way would I have been prepared for an engineering career without it, including MSEE from UT-Austin.

I can assure you that we knew and socialized with plenty of public and parochial school students, I and my fellow private school compadres. My sister was in the same public high school that I attended in ninth grade. Friends that flunked out or got kicked out then transferred to public school and contributed to the intermingling. Nothing says that I have to sit in a classroom with whatever crew I drank beer with on the weekends, in order to be a "grounded" student.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2021, 11:17 AM
 
86 posts, read 105,811 times
Reputation: 109
OP- Both programs are rather strong. Awty is a bit older. It started as a French School, and is now considered an International School. John Cooper is a bit younger, but still has a strong reputation. Awty's school/student population tends to be considered more "International" and does experience some level of families moving a bit. Both are rather diverse. Awty moreso if you include international students... From the families I know at either school, families were more likely to go from the Woodlands to Awty than the other way around (usually due to transportation/work). I know that Awty did have buses that stopped around a few select areas around town. I don't know that John Cooper did. The one big thing that stands out for many families is that Awty offers IB Diplomas and French Baccalaureate Diplomas (in addition to the traditional US diploma). As far as I've known John Cooper was the traditional degree. Best of luck with whatever you decide.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2021, 03:16 PM
 
62 posts, read 47,004 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by groovamos View Post
Bunk. What kind of twisted psychology holds that going to a private school 'un-grounds" a student? I went to public school in Nashville 1 thru 9, and then the best private school in the state for 10 thru 12, Montgomery Bell Academy. Once I got through calculus I and II at UT-Chattanooga, Vanderbilt let me in for my last 3 college years. Wouldn't have happened without my private school years. No way would I have been prepared for an engineering career without it, including MSEE from UT-Austin.

I can assure you that we knew and socialized with plenty of public and parochial school students, I and my fellow private school compadres. My sister was in the same public high school that I attended in ninth grade. Friends that flunked out or got kicked out then transferred to public school and contributed to the intermingling. Nothing says that I have to sit in a classroom with whatever crew I drank beer with on the weekends, in order to be a "grounded" student.
We should probably stop this before it turns into just sharing anecdotes back-and-forth, derailing the thread, but you didn't really address being grounded (i.e. having an appreciation for and recognition of the challenges students face from a disadvantaged background, acknowledging private school tuition costs more than most Americans' annual salary, etc.).

How do private schools ensure they don't foster an attitude of entitlement amongst its students? I doubt many private school students "intermingle" or drink beer with those that got free lunches or whose parents had to work two jobs to put food on the table.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2021, 01:33 AM
 
Location: Houston
2,123 posts, read 2,905,345 times
Reputation: 1491
when you break down by race that's where the social aspect kicks in.

An AA at a private school such as those will probably have a harder time blending in socially cause they are caught between a rock and a hard place. Not of enough of their own to really be themselves and the other half may/may not accept them at face value so you got to conform and stay conformed for quite some time. Happens all the time - not as much as the ones who play sports at a high level but the non-sports yes.

At the end of the day its about what you do outside to be prepared for the inside
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2021, 09:12 AM
 
181 posts, read 163,218 times
Reputation: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waffleton View Post
We should probably stop this before it turns into just sharing anecdotes back-and-forth, derailing the thread, but you didn't really address being grounded (i.e. having an appreciation for and recognition of the challenges students face from a disadvantaged background, acknowledging private school tuition costs more than most Americans' annual salary, etc.).

How do private schools ensure they don't foster an attitude of entitlement amongst its students? I doubt many private school students "intermingle" or drink beer with those that got free lunches or whose parents had to work two jobs to put food on the table.
I went to HSPVA and that was the type of school (im sure there are many others across the country) where you truly had kids from very wealthy families intermingling with kids straight from the hood and everything in between. I myself was on more of the side of the less priveleged but never really felt like an outcast or unaccepted. We were bonded by a common theme.....the arts.

I hate to break it to you but even in nice public schools there is a separation. The school my now small children go to (memorial villages zoned elementary) there is not much diversity. Sure there are kids that get the free lunches etc, but I hear from my kids that they are generally outcasts. I have specific conversations with my sons about how this topic and let them know that we come from that background, and that good people come from all walks of life. Unfortunately however, without sending my kids to a school thats zoned to a more diverse neighborhood set, they also wont get the diversity in public.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Houston

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top