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Old 09-28-2009, 08:21 PM
 
1,329 posts, read 3,553,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radiodude84 View Post
pay for it with a tax on fast food. I suspect the demand curve for junk food is completely inelastic here given the size of Houstonian's waistlines!!!

Oh and thanks for posting the stats I was too lazy to look up, even though somebody here already posted an article pointing out Houston's higher crime rate.
Houston's annual sales tax revenues from all sources are just north of $400m a year. I think that $400m represents 2% out of the 8.25% sales tax, meaning that 1% is about $200m. A 0.75% sales tax hike (to raise $150m) - bringing the sales tax up to 9% - coupled with a $125 per household property tax increase might do the trick.
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Old 09-28-2009, 08:43 PM
 
265 posts, read 598,328 times
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High crime is a byproduct of the city's "good ol boy" mentality.
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Old 09-28-2009, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Fondren SW Yo
2,783 posts, read 6,689,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhang Fei View Post
Houston is more dangerous than LA and New York City. (Note that this is a reference to the cities proper, not their suburbs or metro areas). I've provided links to the city data pages that provide crime stats for these cities. On a per capita basis, New York is safer in every category than Houston, whereas Los Angeles is worse only in the category of arsons. I think Houston is significantly under-resourced in terms of police coverage per capita, relative to the other two cities. I suspect bringing the number of cops per capita up to LA's figures would help bring the crime rate down significantly.

But to do that would cost hundreds of millions a year, not counting the pension obligations. Say Houston adds 2000 cops at a fully-burdened cost (i.e. including benefits, office space, equipment, training, air conditioning, patrol car, gas) of $120K a year each. That would mean an additional cost of $240m a year. Divided up over Houston's 718,000 households, that would mean an average property tax increase of about $334 a year. How many people would pay that much money for a safer Houston? I suspect many would prefer to take their chances. and keep their hard-earned cash.
Statistics such as city wide crime levels are all but meaningless. The only use a set of statistics has is the conclusion(s) that can be drawn from it. Especially when you are talking about crime (or more specifically, the likelihood of a crime happening), local stats trump "writ large" stats. To wit, one can accurately say the city of L.A. has a lower crime rate than the city of Houston, but at the same time, one is statistically safer strolling down the street in Meyerland than he is in the Koreatown neighborhood of L.A. So who cares that the Heights or the Third Ward is more dangerous than Rancho Park or Sherman Oaks if you aren't going to be spending time in any of those neighborhoods?

Moderator cut: off topic

Last edited by Chickrae; 09-29-2009 at 06:31 AM.. Reason: off topic
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Hell's Kitchen, NYC
2,271 posts, read 5,160,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tstone View Post
Also don't mention how many homes have been torched over the past several weeks there in that glorified barrio, I mean, up and coming area. Now I'm going to respond to the OP with the usual, inner-looper catch-phrase of "crime happens everywhere!" and proceed to bury my head in the sand.
Well, the suburbs are an impenetrable fortress, right?
Now I'm going to go count how many "strange" figures walk past my house on the sidewalk whilst I wait by the phone.
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:20 PM
 
1,329 posts, read 3,553,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rb4browns View Post
Especially when you are talking about crime (or more specifically, the likelihood of a crime happening), local stats trump "writ large" stats. To wit, one can accurately say the city of L.A. has a lower crime rate than the city of Houston, but at the same time, one is statistically safer strolling down the street in Meyerland than he is in the Koreatown neighborhood of L.A. So who cares that the Heights or the Third Ward is more dangerous than Rancho Park or Sherman Oaks if you aren't going to be spending time in any of those neighborhoods?
Assuming Koreatown is 90005 and Meyerland is 77096, you are objectively safer in Koreatown, even though you might feel safer in Meyerland.
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Old 09-28-2009, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Fondren SW Yo
2,783 posts, read 6,689,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhang Fei View Post
Assuming Koreatown is 90005 and Meyerland is 77096, you are objectively safer in Koreatown, even though you might feel safer in Meyerland.
You can have Koreatown then, with its 12 violent robberies and 4 aggravated assaults in the last week. I will take Meyerland
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Old 09-29-2009, 10:28 AM
 
93 posts, read 284,470 times
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Just read page 1 and skipped to 5, were people honestly saying LA is safer than Houston? I can't think of a street in Houston that you can't safely walk down during the daytime(and yes, i've been to plenty of 'ghettos'). On the contrary, I can name over 10 in LA. Wow that's hilarious.
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Old 09-29-2009, 11:16 AM
 
243 posts, read 489,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by radiodude84 View Post
Okay, I don't know why people have such trouble with stats! What you guys are saying are anecdotes, you realize that right? Like if an alien came to earth and his sole goal was to go as long as he can without being robbed or randomly shot, he would rationally choose NYC or LA over Houston. You people don't deny this right? This has nothing to do with whether there are bad parts in other cities.

Also, maybe the reason NYC and LA are safer is precisely because they have more concentrated bad areas, so it's very easy to police them and for normal citizens to avoid them. The fact that Houston has so many bad places mixed with good might be the causal mechanism by which it is more dangerous. But that it is more dangerous is not up for debate.

I feel like I'm tutoring math again :-/
I really think you are splitting hairs with this. Whether our muder rate is 16 or 12 is really not looking at the forest from the trees. That does not make Houston significantly more unsafe than LA or NYC. Would you rather be DC, Philadelphia, or Detroit? Does something need to be done about crime in our city? Of course. Is this also the case for all cities? Yes. Since you brought up the issue, my question for you is what do you propose to do about it?

I will also say that random violent crime as reported by these statistics is very rare. 95% of violent crime is committed against those who were in a situation they shouldn't have been in to begin with (associated with gangs, drugs, etc). In most cases, if you are not looking for trouble, it won't come looking for you.
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Old 09-29-2009, 04:12 PM
 
1,329 posts, read 3,553,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyhawk View Post
95% of violent crime is committed against those who were in a situation they shouldn't have been in to begin with (associated with gangs, drugs, etc).
This is only partially true. I read somewhere that 70-80% of murders are perpetrated by gang members against other gang members. On the other hand, rapes, robberies, home invasions and aggravated assaults are not an intramural affair. Neither are non-violent crimes like car break-ins, burglaries and thefts.
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Old 09-29-2009, 04:18 PM
 
1,329 posts, read 3,553,279 times
Reputation: 989
Quote:
Originally Posted by Invictis View Post
Just read page 1 and skipped to 5, were people honestly saying LA is safer than Houston? I can't think of a street in Houston that you can't safely walk down during the daytime(and yes, i've been to plenty of 'ghettos'). On the contrary, I can name over 10 in LA. Wow that's hilarious.
Perceptions and actual facts (statistics and incident reports) don't always run in lockstep. LA is an older city than Houston, which means most of it will look more run-down than Houston. But being run-down and being less safe are different things.
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