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Old 01-16-2012, 06:03 AM
 
37 posts, read 97,085 times
Reputation: 38

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We have been in our new construction home for 1 year. It is a 1 story ranch about 2200 square feet. In the heat of summer and in the cold of winter, we have a 7 degree difference in temperature in opposite ends of house.
For instance, one day last week, it was 40 degrees outside. Thermostat in the middle of house was set on 70. One end of house(where the unit is outside) was 72 degrees. The farthest room in house was 65 degrees.
When this occurred last summer, the company that had put this unit in for our builder, came out and basically said this is normal. I told him to tell that to our guests who have been chilled to the bone or sweltered in the summertime. He did reluctantly go into attic and adjusted some baffles( I think) . I need to get them out here again but I just wondered if anyone on here had any ideas or is this normal.

Thanks!
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Old 01-16-2012, 07:15 AM
 
35 posts, read 47,060 times
Reputation: 69
Not right! If it is forced air system then it might be fixable with baffles as long as the ductwork is the right sizes and the vents are in the right places. Definitely call them and tell them it is not acceptable. If they wont fix it then get it fixed and take it to small claims court.
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Old 01-16-2012, 10:11 AM
 
20,691 posts, read 61,886,263 times
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This should be in the house forum.

With forced hot air and a long house, there WILL be variations as you get further from the central unit. Dampers can adjust out some of it, but there is enough heat loss on long runs (especially on cold days with heat pumps that only minimally heat the air) that the system can't be fully compensated. Bigger ducts, duct fans, and so on are stopgap measures.

Our master bedroom sits at the opposite end of the house from the heat pump, and I knew from the get-go it would have to have individual heating and cooling (which is fine, since it allows us to cut off the heat or AC to the rest of the place overnight).
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:15 PM
 
3,017 posts, read 3,939,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaSc123 View Post
We have been in our new construction home for 1 year. It is a 1 story ranch about 2200 square feet. In the heat of summer and in the cold of winter, we have a 7 degree difference in temperature in opposite ends of house.
For instance, one day last week, it was 40 degrees outside. Thermostat in the middle of house was set on 70. One end of house(where the unit is outside) was 72 degrees. The farthest room in house was 65 degrees.
When this occurred last summer, the company that had put this unit in for our builder, came out and basically said this is normal. I told him to tell that to our guests who have been chilled to the bone or sweltered in the summertime. He did reluctantly go into attic and adjusted some baffles( I think) . I need to get them out here again but I just wondered if anyone on here had any ideas or is this normal.

Thanks!
Who built your home? If it is one of the low cost/high volume builders, you got the cheapest grade, smallest unit possible along with the minimum installation to meet code requirements. It is just one of the many trade offs that come with these types of homes and it sounds normal for times during extreme temperatures. It is only going to heat/cool until the area where the thermostat is located reaches the set temperature. If you only have one unit and one thermostat, don't be surprised when the areas farthest from the thermostat have varying temperatures.

cnyscapes, great attitude....the home building industry getting sued all the time is one of the reasons homes are so expensive. Did you realize that probably around 20% of the cost of a new home goes directly to liability insurance that the builder/subcontractors/suppliers have to carry because so many frivolous lawsuits are filed against them?
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Old 01-23-2012, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Tuscaloosa, Alabama
234 posts, read 656,834 times
Reputation: 111
It might also have something to do with how much sun exposure each end of your house gets. That kind of stuff can easily be fixed by paying attention to when your windows' blinds are open and closed.
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:08 PM
 
261 posts, read 683,444 times
Reputation: 139
As others have mentioned, some variation is normal and there's only so much that adjusting dampers will do for you. However, don't give up hope just yet.

We used to own a second home in Madison, and I think the builder's HVAC contractor was Durham. We had some issues initially, and they sent out two techs who spent a quite some time making adjustments to dampers. Eventually, they replaced a duct run to one bedroom and that made a huge difference. You may want to ask your HVAC tech to check your ducts both for appropriate size and for leaks (an installer might have failed to properly seal connections.)

The hvac techs were unable to achieve a good result in one room, despite their best efforts, because of a combination of afternoon sun (it had a SW exposure) and multiple computers (too much heat generated by both the computers and their users.) We installed insulating film (designed for double pane windows) to mitigate solar heat gain, but that wasn't enough. Finally, we installed a window A/C for the three months/yr. it was way too hot and masked it outside with a decorative screen so that it wasn't visible from the street.

There are newer portable A/C units that have intake/exhaust ducts in a small frame only about 5 or 6 inches high that fits into a standard single or double hung window. They're even less likely to cause HOA issues.

Good luck!
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