U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-19-2007, 12:38 AM
 
Location: imprisoned in chicago
326 posts, read 395,367 times
Reputation: 52

Advertisements

I don't know why some people complain about south florida houses being like boxes. As far as I know, they are built like that without overhangs to make them more streamlined so that they perform better in hurricanes. I mean, which would you rather have, a concrete box that will hold up in a big hurricane and protect you and your valuables, or some wood frame overhang that will catch wind like a parachute and come crashing down on you? Even if that overhang is made of concrete, there is still a chance that wind blowing into it may lift it right up and over and at the very least, leave a gaping hole in the roof. In fact, many homes in Hurricane Andrew failed due to faulty, wind trapping construction. Indeed, the best type of house to have in a hurricane zone is a concrete block box type house. But it does not stop there; the roof has to be properly designed as well, and the best type of roof for a hurricane region is a hipped roof (the "pyramid" type of roof that slopes in all directions) with a slope from horizontal of no less than 35 degrees and no overhangs. Too shallow a slope and the roof becomes like an airplane wing in high winds, which can lead to the roof literally flying off the house in a big hurricane. The worst type of roof is a gable end (the A-frame type of roof that slopes in certain directions and overhangs a triangular wall at each end)which literally catches wind like a sail, leading to the roof simply peeling off as if it were tape being peeled from a window, or worse, the entire house being shifted off its foundation.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-19-2007, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,555,647 times
Reputation: 4934
Long overhangs are necessary in a place like Florida, with hot sunny weather. The fact is that a concrete roof will only blow away if it's lightweight prefab, not attatched to the building except by gravity. Poured concrete tied with columns cannot, and will not blow away. Traditional Florida homes were designed with low profile roofs, and were often single-story to provide the lowest resistance to wind. In the 70's and 80's a stupid "California style" home with high-pitched shingled roofs, and wood frame over stucco took over in the late 70's to the 80's.




These flimsy structures did not survive the test of Andrew. Meanwhile the boxes of Leisure City were undamaged with their concrete roofs.

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-19-2007, 08:16 PM
 
Location: imprisoned in chicago
326 posts, read 395,367 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Long overhangs are necessary in a place like Florida, with hot sunny weather.[/IMG]
In my opinion, long overhangs are not necesarry if you simply put up a dining canopy in your yard!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2008, 06:21 AM
 
Location: St Petersburg / South Pasadena, Florida
26 posts, read 90,542 times
Reputation: 14
I have wondered why a break away roof overhang has not been engineered or maybe something like a pergola edged roof. I think concrete panel houses are the wave of the future for Florida. You can read about them on my blog at Real Estate Blog - PRECAST CONCRETE HOMES - THE NEW WAVE IN FLORIDA HOME CONSTRUCTION
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2008, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 20,494,413 times
Reputation: 2916
Quote:
Originally Posted by StPeteFLGuy View Post
I have wondered why a break away roof overhang has not been engineered...
Wow, if everyone had a break away roof overhang, could you imagine, the debra that will caused by that and the damage that, that debra could do to your neighbors. Everything needs to be built to stay in place. Anyplace that is in a hurricane zone, from Texas to the Carolinas needs to have the same building code as Miami-Dade County. People in these zones should also be required to have shutters. I have friends in Odessa Florida that don't have any shutters for their home, and plan to stay in their home if a hurricane comes, just crazy to me. I have watched on the news people rebuilding their homes after Katrina, using stick frame homes again, its just crazy have they learned anything?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:29 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top