U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2007, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996

Advertisements

The National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade County continued to monitor two tropical disturbances on Monday, both with potential to develop into depressions or storms.

One was in the central Atlantic, about 850 miles east of the Windward Islands at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, moving west-northwest at about 15 mph, the hurricane center said.

While it posed no immediate threat to land, the system still bears watching because it was expected to move into the Caribbean within the next three days, forecasters said.

STORMY SEPTEMBER

Historically, the Atlantic hurricane season peaks on September 10 and the period from August 20 until October 14 produces the greatest number of storms.

Last edited by sunrico90; 07-30-2007 at 05:25 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-30-2007, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
Reputation: 4934
Does that mean that we can look forward to the 24 hour tropical depression coverage on the TV news? Ahh the treasured Florida memories of would-be storms past. Then again it's better than many of the TV shows!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2007, 10:59 PM
 
4,408 posts, read 9,255,282 times
Reputation: 4119
Hurricane coverage on TV - Reality TV!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2007, 06:28 PM
 
262 posts, read 870,100 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrico90 View Post
The National Hurricane Center in Miami-Dade County continued to monitor two tropical disturbances on Monday, both with potential to develop into depressions or storms.

One was in the central Atlantic, about 850 miles east of the Windward Islands at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, moving west-northwest at about 15 mph, the hurricane center said.

While it posed no immediate threat to land, the system still bears watching because it was expected to move into the Caribbean within the next three days, forecasters said.
The system east of the Windwards is indeed a bear-watch. It's been dubbed Invest 99L, and could become a depression if the dry air doesn't choke it. There's a possibility they might send recon into it tomorrow "if necessary."

Meanwhile, a system in the central Atlantic has become TS Chantal, but it won't be much longer, as it's headed toward Nova Scotia.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-31-2007, 09:00 PM
 
36 posts, read 150,554 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Does that mean that we can look forward to the 24 hour tropical depression coverage on the TV news? Ahh the treasured Florida memories of would-be storms past. Then again it's better than many of the TV shows!
Channel 7 is the "best" one!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2007, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996
Lightbulb Tropical wave approaching Windward Islands

A tropical wave approaching the Windward Islands is scheduled to be investigated by Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunters this afternoon. The wave is just east of the Windwards and has shown some increase in convection the last few hours. Squally weather has invaded the island of Barbados and winds there gusted over 30 mph around midday.

Although environmental conditions are not especially favorable for strengthening, the wave still stands a chance of becoming a depression over the next day or two as it sweeps westward at 15 to 20 mph. Showers and gusty winds will plague the Windward Islands for the next 24 hours or so.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Basin, cloudiness and showers increased markely this morning in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico along a trough of low pressure. Some slow development of a tropical system is possible over the next couple of days, and Hurricane Hunters may check out the region tomorrow.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2007, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996
Lightbulb Atlantic possibilities

A strong tropical wave in the Caribbean and a trough of low pressure in the Gulf of Mexico are being monitored for any further development.

Hurricane Hunters investigated the strong wave in the eastern Caribbean Sea Thursday afternoon and found that the system has not formed a closed low pressure center yet.

Conditions are somewhat favorable for the system to get better organized once it passes west of Jamaica later Friday or Saturday. Stay away from Jamaica

Hurricane Hunters are on standby to fly into the wave again Friday afternoon should the system look like it is getting better organized.

Meanwhile, closer to home in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and Florida, a cold front left behind a trough of low pressure, which continues to be the focus for thunderstorms.


A broad area of low pressure is currently swirling over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. As wind shear over the system continues to lessen, there is a small chance that that a better circulation could spin out of this broad trough of low pressure Friday or Saturday.

Hurricane Hunters are also on standby to fly into this system should conditions warrant it Friday.


Regardless of whether this system develops tropical characterizes, increased thunderstorms will impact northern Florida, and parts of the Southeast into Saturday.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2007, 09:46 AM
 
3 posts, read 14,819 times
Reputation: 12
Hey there folks,

First time here and i just want to start off by saying hello to all of you Floridians.

I myself used to live in Florida many years ago, specifically from 1984 to 1994 and i have myself lived through several hurricanes, some of which include hurricanes- Kate ( 1986 ) and Andrew (1992 ) <- - - Was visiting family in Homestead when Andrew hit.

Now on to the reason i am posting here, i am now a Meteorologist and i am going to donate my two cents worth on this season's hurricane season so far.

So far this year we have experienced only three named storms- none of which even came close to Cat-1 category, Albeit they formed in the early stages of the Season and climatology tells us that most storms that do form early on do not typically strengthen.

So far this season the upper level winds have been to strong to allow any sort of eye catching development, I.E. very strong shear !!!

Couple that with the fact that the SST's in the equatorial Atlantic and E. Carribean are still somewhat cool and thus is inhibiting any significant development at this time.

So far this week there have been two features that have caught my attention.

One of these features is currently tracking towards E. Jamaica and at this time does not look to threatning, but could ( and i emphsaize Could ) become intersting to watch come late Sunday Night and Early monday as it is forecasted to move into warmer waters in the W. carribean and will encounter minimal to no shear.

The second feature i speak of is currently affecting the Panhandle of Florida and SE Georgia today. Satellite indicates that there is an area Low Pressure but that it is in the upper levels and not at the Surface which would make this particular feature worth Noting significantly. Side Note: <- - - - the panhandle and SE Georgia will get beneficial rains from the Upper Level Low as it sits in this rea for the next day or two.

So to summarize, Quiet Hurricane season so far, 3-named storms but stay prepared as we are heading into the heart of Hurricane Season and i wouldn't be surprised to see at least 2 Cat-5 storms this year.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2007, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moosanova View Post
Hey there folks,

First time here and i just want to start off by saying hello to all of you Floridians.

I myself used to live in Florida many years ago, specifically from 1984 to 1994 and i have myself lived through several hurricanes, some of which include hurricanes- Kate ( 1986 ) and Andrew (1992 ) <- - - Was visiting family in Homestead when Andrew hit.

Now on to the reason i am posting here, i am now a Meteorologist and i am going to donate my two cents worth on this season's hurricane season so far.

So far this year we have experienced only three named storms- none of which even came close to Cat-1 category, Albeit they formed in the early stages of the Season and climatology tells us that most storms that do form early on do not typically strengthen.

So far this season the upper level winds have been to strong to allow any sort of eye catching development, I.E. very strong shear !!!

Couple that with the fact that the SST's in the equatorial Atlantic and E. Carribean are still somewhat cool and thus is inhibiting any significant development at this time.

So far this week there have been two features that have caught my attention.

One of these features is currently tracking towards E. Jamaica and at this time does not look to threatning, but could ( and i emphsaize Could ) become intersting to watch come late Sunday Night and Early monday as it is forecasted to move into warmer waters in the W. carribean and will encounter minimal to no shear.

The second feature i speak of is currently affecting the Panhandle of Florida and SE Georgia today. Satellite indicates that there is an area Low Pressure but that it is in the upper levels and not at the Surface which would make this particular feature worth Noting significantly. Side Note: <- - - - the panhandle and SE Georgia will get beneficial rains from the Upper Level Low as it sits in this rea for the next day or two.

So to summarize, Quiet Hurricane season so far, 3-named storms but stay prepared as we are heading into the heart of Hurricane Season and i wouldn't be surprised to see at least 2 Cat-5 storms this year.
Welcome to the team...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2007, 11:16 AM
 
9 posts, read 50,047 times
Reputation: 10
WOW - This is better than the weather segment from the local news! Thanks.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top