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Old 10-31-2012, 06:51 PM
 
99 posts, read 375,417 times
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NYC/NJ, I'm glad you guys are okay and today I've found out my sister's okay in Newark, NJ today. How is the Brooklyn Bridge, BTW? Is it all right, someone told me it got destroyed during the storm. I hope not, I hope everybody all right up there and God bless America. P.S. I don't watch the news often, I'm just online a lot browsing. Please don't shoot me for this. T.V. just doesn't interest me like it did when I was a kid to teenager... Especially watching Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, and rap music (East Coast rap) like I did in the late 80s to early 2000s.
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Old 11-02-2012, 09:55 AM
 
22,769 posts, read 28,773,834 times
Reputation: 14657
Quote:
Originally Posted by timlee View Post
What is the category of Sandy? More severe than Hugo?
well, to give you a comparison -

storm surge peak
Sandy, 12 feet (NY)
Hugo, 17 feet (SC)
Andrew, 17 feet (FL)
Katrina, 28 feet (MS)


sustained wind speed at u.s. landfall
Sandy, 80mph (NJ)
Katrina, 125mph (LA)
Hugo, 138mph (SC)
Andrew, 146mph (FL)

so... Sandy was not a big storm by U.S. standards. However the northeast is far more vulnerable to hurricanes than the southeast, and even a small hurricane can do a great deal of damage up there.
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Old 11-02-2012, 02:01 PM
 
11,925 posts, read 12,089,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
well, to give you a comparison -

storm surge peak
Sandy, 12 feet (NY)
Hugo, 17 feet (SC)
Andrew, 17 feet (FL)
Katrina, 28 feet (MS)


sustained wind speed at u.s. landfall
Sandy, 80mph (NJ)
Katrina, 125mph (LA)
Hugo, 138mph (SC)
Andrew, 146mph (FL)

so... Sandy was not a big storm by U.S. standards. However the northeast is far more vulnerable to hurricanes than the southeast, and even a small hurricane can do a great deal of damage up there.
It has Nothing to do with NYC has more People than Mississippi and Louisana combined, and land values 3-4X more expensive the MS is why Sandy caused so much damage. Also the Coast between New Haven, CT, and Cape May, NJ has nearly 30 Million people (More than LA, MS,AL, GA, AND SC combined), all affected by a ~12 Ft Surge and/or 80+ winds. Hurricane wind gusts felt from NC to Boston (60 million people)
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Old 11-03-2012, 05:23 PM
 
48,507 posts, read 91,325,774 times
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The normal areaa struck by hurricaners of sourse deal and are better prepared than one like new York who haven't experiencved them. Just as those areas are not ready to deal with a ice storm. just common sense ;really. If you live in a hurricane area you know thateach can be different .The worse is yopu get hit with a abvoe cat 3 or you get hit with one like Ike with surage to 15 feet with high winds and are withi the eye wall area. Lots of near misses and cat 1 storms with very narrow eye wall pluis little real surge thew area can deal with.Just as most realise that Katrina actually was likemnay storms that the eye wall mised new orleans;they were on left side of storm bu they suffered a collase of the storm levy that made all the differnce in results.
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Old 11-06-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
2,890 posts, read 3,751,675 times
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Florida can take hurricanes much better than any other part of the country. our soil is porous so it drains quickly and our buildings are all built to withstand winds of at least 135kts(156mph).
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:35 AM
 
Location: New York
11,340 posts, read 18,899,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
well, to give you a comparison -

so... Sandy was not a big storm by U.S. standards. However the northeast is far more vulnerable to hurricanes than the southeast, and even a small hurricane can do a great deal of damage up there.
Sandy was indeed a big storm by U.S. standards, it was the largest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic basin, with a diameter greater than 1,100 miles. It claimed roughly 300 lives, and in terms of damage it's second only to Katrina.

Had Sandy struck the southeast, it wouldn't have been a walk in the park. Isaac was smaller and weaker than Sandy, but look at the amount of damage it did to parts of Louisiana, Mississippi, etc.
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Old 11-07-2013, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
377 posts, read 303,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by le roi View Post
well, to give you a comparison -

storm surge peak
Sandy, 12 feet (NY)
Hugo, 17 feet (SC)
Andrew, 17 feet (FL)
Katrina, 28 feet (MS)


sustained wind speed at u.s. landfall
Sandy, 80mph (NJ)
Katrina, 125mph (LA)
Hugo, 138mph (SC)
Andrew, 146mph (FL)

so... Sandy was not a big storm by U.S. standards. However the northeast is far more vulnerable to hurricanes than the southeast, and even a small hurricane can do a great deal of damage up there.
Actually Sandy's highest storm surge was 13.88 ft at Battery Park:

Superstorm Sandy | Infoplease.com
Hurricane Sandy's Storm Surge Mapped ... Before It Hit

And it had winds of 90 mph at landfall, not 80 mph.

Post-Tropical Cyclone SANDY

Not to mention that it was the largest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic and affected tens of millions of people...it was a big storm.
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Old 11-09-2013, 12:06 AM
 
Location: H-town, TX.
3,503 posts, read 6,727,442 times
Reputation: 2232
Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
Florida can take hurricanes much better than any other part of the country. our soil is porous so it drains quickly and our buildings are all built to withstand winds of at least 135kts(156mph).
The flip side of that porous soil is that Florida is built on equally porous limestone.

Last I checked, sinkholes welcome everything in with...openings.

So, Florida taking hurricanes "much better" might be a wee bit shortsighted.
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Old 11-09-2013, 08:15 AM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
46,079 posts, read 48,292,079 times
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14 feet of storm surge isn't minor. It's not to the scale of Hugo or Andrew. But Sandy affected a large, and perhaps the most populated coastal location in the US.

Sandy's winds weren't the main cause of damage. But they did knock a lot of trees and power lines down, and a few people died from falling trees / debris.
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Old 11-09-2013, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Rocky Mountain Xplorer
956 posts, read 1,430,521 times
Reputation: 690
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenochitlan View Post
Actually Sandy's highest storm surge was 13.88 ft at Battery Park:

Superstorm Sandy | Infoplease.com
Hurricane Sandy's Storm Surge Mapped ... Before It Hit

And it had winds of 90 mph at landfall, not 80 mph.

Post-Tropical Cyclone SANDY

Not to mention that it was the largest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic and affected tens of millions of people...it was a big storm.
Maybe big, but certainly not intense or even significant meteorologically speaking. The fact that it hit the NorthEast is the why the storm got as much hype as it did. And I don't mean for a moment to discount in any way the loss of life or property damage here, but strictly in terms of weather it wasn't that significant.
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