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Old 10-23-2015, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
1,194 posts, read 905,353 times
Reputation: 4394

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Another livecam view from Puerto Vallarta Sur (southern part)

Puerto Vallarta Sur

This will very likely be the first live cam to 'go down'

Quite a view... while it lasts
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:06 AM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,412 posts, read 2,360,185 times
Reputation: 10714
Pyrozach, NBC is reporting 39 foot storm surge. They did not name what cities, however.

I really wish our country wasn't so self-centered. Just because it's a foreign land, does not mean it's 'not as important.'
I feel so badly for the poor, that have little means of escape from this monster, and many will most likely perish.
This storm is not being reported on nearly enough. We should be using resources right now to help these people escape.

Last edited by TerraDown; 10-23-2015 at 07:45 AM..
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
1,194 posts, read 905,353 times
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Inland, Guadalajara livecam:

Plaza de Armas - Guadalajara

Very likely to experience horrific flooding itself, inland Guadalajara is the nearest 'big' metroplex from which rescue efforts would typically be staged out of.
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:19 AM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,412 posts, read 2,360,185 times
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Here's the streaming camera:
Streams - Webcams de México
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:25 AM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,412 posts, read 2,360,185 times
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Want to ask a question.

Is the storm surge created by the shore line water being sucked into the storm first, and then thrust back onto shore?

I know how tsunamis are created from an earthquake, but would like to know how the hurricane is going to create the storm surge.

Also, what are the tide schedules there? IS high tide going to coincide with the arrival?

Last edited by TerraDown; 10-23-2015 at 07:45 AM..
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
1,194 posts, read 905,353 times
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Incredible!

LIVECAM on the ground, on the beach in Puerto Vallarta:

Webcam

People are standing around taking pictures out to sea.



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Old 10-23-2015, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
14,188 posts, read 14,594,119 times
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Guys, it's not a tsunami, it's a storm surge.

BTW, this thing, either currently or some point last night, got even stronger than the 200mph/880mb. That was measured just after midnight and the storm was deepening with every recon pass. Unfortunately, they had to leave before it peaked, so pressure may have challenged the all-time world record of 870mb recorded in Typhoon Tip in 1970. Winds probably peaked between 205-215mph sustained. Not sure what they are right now, but probably close to 200mph still. Another recon won't be in the system until early afternoon, unfortunately, and by then it could weaken just a bit. We may never know just how strong it really got. Still, at 200mph, that is the highest wind for any tropical system ever.
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
1,194 posts, read 905,353 times
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Next HIGH TIDE in Puerto Vallarta is at 7:54 PM, which is in 11 hr 17 min 22 s from now.

Next LOW TIDE in Puerto Vallarta is at 1:53 PM, which is in 5 hr 16 min 22 s from now.

The local time in Puerto Vallarta is 8:37:37 AM.

Tide Times and Tide Chart for Puerto Vallarta

for more info, including charts, see link
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma USA
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Its looking like all commercial flights in and out of Puerto Vallarta PVR are cancelled

https://www.aeropuertosgap.com.mx/es/?Itemid=1250

(You have to click on each individual flight to see that it is cancelled)
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Old 10-23-2015, 07:50 AM
 
4,343 posts, read 2,201,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
Want to ask a question.

Is the tsunami created by the shore line water being sucked into the storm first, and then thrust back onto shore? I know how tsunamis are created from an earthquake, but would like to know how the hurricane is going to do it.

Also, what are the tide schedules there? IS high tide going to coincide with the arrival?
I don't know the tide schedules at this time.

It's not really a tsunami with a hurricane. Some people refer to it as that because the end result is similar as far as damage and more people are aware of tsunami's. The rise of water associated with a hurricane is called storm surge, or just surge.

The main surge typically comes onshore with the eyewall of a hurricane. Water starts to rise several hours before the center arrives but isn't really that much (maybe a few feet) until the eye actually arrives at the shore. The surge height (usually given in feet) is the height the water is predicted to rise as the strongest winds of the storm around the eye arrive along the coast.

This is NOT a giant wave. It is the actual ocean that gains height by the prolonged strong winds around the core of a storm. On TOP of this mound of water are large waves as well. So if you're in a building that's 2 feet above the predicted surge height then yes the surge itself may not get you but the waves on top will deal significant damage as well.

Surge can last less then an hour to several hours depending on how fast a storm is moving through, and the lay of the land. Rivers, streams, and bays can allow this surge to travel further inland some and can amplify the surge due to curvature of the coast in some situations (read: you DONT want to be in a bay with a storm surge usually).

This surge rises rapidly when the eye comes assure and immediately cuts off escape routes, can carry away cars, trucks, and entire buildings by the force of the water. This is how you see large ships sitting a few blocks inland sometimes.

Water is the number one killer of a hurricane.

More information can be found officially here: Storm Surge Overview
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