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Old 09-23-2017, 09:29 AM
 
Location: God's Country
5,185 posts, read 3,890,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
Email from brother 9/19/17, Marco Island:


Anyway, we’re still in Marco. The biggest problem we now have is that power is still not restored – going on 11 days now. Most of the area around us has power, but we think a transformer that only serves our house and 2 or 3 neighbors is damaged, so we are a relative low priority to the power company compared to more concentrated population areas. We can’t even get an estimate from the power company on when power will be restored. Once we get power, we can have a new AC unit installed – it was blown off (or knocked off) the pedestal during the storm and damaged beyond repair. It was an old unit (16 years old) so we didn’t expect it to last much longer anyway. The other problems were minor roof damage – a few displaced and broken roof tiles, and missing portions of the soffits, and most of the pool cage screens blown out. The frame of the cage is fine, except for one of the screen doors. But the roof is not leaking (the roofs are sealed under the tiles, which are mostly decorative), and I was able to repair all the missing soffits. We have a guy lined up for the pool cage screens and screen door, and another to repair the roof tiles, which can be done while we’re not here. So we’re really just waiting for power so we can get the AC replaced and check out the rest of the electric inside and outside the house. Then we can head back to Maryland.



So we really dodged a bullet with this massive storm. It could have been much worse. When we ride around the island and the surrounding towns, we can see the extensive damage that was done by Irma. Some people lost entire roofs, others most of the home’s contents due to storm surge, and others entire homes. Most of these were in Goodland and Everglades City. Also, we were very fortunate that our friends & neighbors William and Julie, who have power, have allowed us to live in their vacant home while waiting for our power to return.


We’ve been very busy since we got here last Wednesday. After cleaning up the debris in our yard and our neighbors yards, Cindy and I volunteered to buy and deliver supplies to hard hit areas, primarily Goodland. Its really amazing how many people down here donate their time and money to help those in need. Their generosity is infectious, and the need is real. So we’re making use of our time while waiting for things to happen here. We’ve also found time to hook up with our friends for dinner or happy hour, and to watch the Ravens game at a local sports bar.




So hopefully we’ll get power soon and be heading back to Maryland. We’ll keep you posted. Thanks again for your thoughts and prayers!

So my brother's power on Marco has been restored, and he has made arrangements for house restoration. Yay. Tomorrow he heads back to Md ..... where Maria could hit us.
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Old 09-23-2017, 10:26 AM
 
31,951 posts, read 49,868,116 times
Reputation: 17821
Yes
NWS predicting a "bad" hurricane season was understated
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Old 09-23-2017, 10:35 AM
 
31,951 posts, read 49,868,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Just got around to this. I typically watch this guys videos. Good stuff on lawns. He lives in Florida West side. This was right before Irma hit.


I love his comment... So true!


"This is not Cuba, this is not Barbuda, not St Martin... this is the United States and there's a reason why we have all these strict building codes here, its because of these situations"


"The construction here can handle hurricane winds. The real danger is the surge, not the winds. The ocean water that comes rushing up the rivers over the barrier islands, that's the danger."


"When media says Get Out Now, Evacuate Now, This Is The Real Deal, they are only talking about people who are in those surge zone, flood zones, low lying areas, mobile homes."





https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q75Qdf23Az0
Yes
Storm surge IS responsible more more deaths simply because people go to shelters vs staying in mobile homes
But mandatory evac notices in borderline areas often are late decisions
Many people in Houston area caught short by "unexpected" flooding

That guy is funny
His reasoning same as people our daughter n son in law sheltered with
We are zone 2 for surge evac and have highest elevations on street
But they were worried about Oscar Shearer to our north
Lot of water in there
If rain came heavier or storm moved slower like Harvey could have triggered more flooding than surge maps were predicting
So better safe than leaving too late
Thankfully no flooding cause Irma was less dangerous than more
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Old 09-27-2017, 04:17 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 2,157,223 times
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Florida Keys will open back up to visitors / public Oct 1.
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Old 09-27-2017, 06:36 PM
 
31,951 posts, read 49,868,116 times
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Tourist driven economy

Sarasota county has firemen down there working to help clear debris
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Old 09-28-2017, 01:05 PM
 
10,361 posts, read 3,104,502 times
Reputation: 11263
Quote:
Originally Posted by loves2read View Post
Yes
Storm surge IS responsible more more deaths simply because people go to shelters vs staying in mobile homes
But mandatory evac notices in borderline areas often are late decisions
Many people in Houston area caught short by "unexpected" flooding

That guy is funny
His reasoning same as people our daughter n son in law sheltered with
We are zone 2 for surge evac and have highest elevations on street
But they were worried about Oscar Shearer to our north
Lot of water in there
If rain came heavier or storm moved slower like Harvey could have triggered more flooding than surge maps were predicting
So better safe than leaving too late
Thankfully no flooding cause Irma was less dangerous than more
This explains why they aren't addressing wind anymore. Could NOT figure it out. I never remember hearing about storm surge until last year or so. Houses are built to withstand winds, so fear of that has been decreased. Building codes are tight, house can withstand cat 2/3 hurricanes pretty well in FL with minimal damage.

Media has to ramp up fear by promoting storm surge instead. Makes perfect sense.
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Old 09-29-2017, 07:35 AM
 
31,951 posts, read 49,868,116 times
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I don't think it is about "ramping" up fear--but telling people about a real danger
I am from TX and San Antonio/the hill country where my sister lives has ALWAYS had a problem with people not paying attention to heavy rains and flash flooding...
With people on country and city roads driving into sections where water has covered the surface
People were swept away because water was deeper than they anticipated or the flow was swifter...there were always incidents in times of stormy weather with people either being rescued or being drowned
San Antonio area started real hard press to inform/educate people about the dangers
Turn Around--Don't Drown is very prevalent signage and heard on the news even in dry times
And deaths have dropped significantly

Hurricanes are not as prevalent as flash flooding so people maybe aren't as familiar with the danger of water covering streets and FL has water on roads all the time from the rains--so people get pretty casual about driving into "wet" conditions...
And to give FL engineers credit--most of the time the streets do drain fairly well and there are not many instances of true flash flooding from just normal rain events...
But there are times 2" of water over a street surface if it is moving fast enough can lift a car's wheels and cause it to lose traction w/roadway--making it unsteerable--a boat basically...

And water at night is always a more problematic/dangerous situation than water in daytime
Just like "black ice" water can be difficult to assess and deal with...

The reason the news has to "over" emphasize the dangers of flooding is that most people think they are bullet proof...they deal with rainy streets so often in FL that making them envision the danger of flash flooding and excessive rain is very difficult...
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Old 09-30-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: in a parallel universe
2,351 posts, read 1,479,446 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
This explains why they aren't addressing wind anymore. Could NOT figure it out. I never remember hearing about storm surge until last year or so. Houses are built to withstand winds, so fear of that has been decreased. Building codes are tight, house can withstand cat 2/3 hurricanes pretty well in FL with minimal damage.

Media has to ramp up fear by promoting storm surge instead. Makes perfect sense.
Storm surge is a dangerous reality and should not be downplayed. Here in NY it was the storm surge that ripped 2 little kids from their mothers hands and they were swept out to sea by it. Their bodies weren't found until days later. The mom was only walking in a foot or so of water trying to get out of the flood when the surge hit.
There were other bodies found along the shoreline that were taken by the storm surge too. It also took out a couple of homes and damaged many.
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:29 PM
 
4,267 posts, read 2,157,223 times
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NHC released their final report on Irma (Click on "PDF" next to Irma, data tables, graphs, some pics towards end): https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/in...2017&basin=atl

Read through it, some notables:
-Peak wind speed lowered to 155kts/178mph (Was: 160kts/184mph).

-Winds (*keep in mind observation points are far and few in between, even across Florida...which ALWAYS leads to talk of not as strong as said*):
--Highest Official Wind Gust recorded over land: Barbuda 139kts/160mph *Note: Southern eyewall measured, other side was more powerful.
--Highest Unofficial Wind Gust recorded over land: St. Barthelemy 173kts/199mph
--Highest sustained wind recorded over land: near Cayo Coco, Cuba 108kts/124mph
**Note: Northern eyewall over Turks & Caicos destroyed observation equipment.

--Florida Keys highest gust recorded: Big Pine Key 104knts/120mph
--Florida Keys highest sustained wind recorded: Smith Shoal Light (Key West / Big Pine Key region) 67kts/77mph
--Florida mainland highest gust recorded: Naples 123kts/142mph
--Florida mainland highest sustained wind recorded: Marco Island 97knts/112mph


Surge:
Barbuda: 7.9ft
US Virgin Islands: equipment failed
Puerto Rico: 1.5ft
Cuba (Ciego de Ávila Province): 10-11.5ft - water reached 0.5+miles inland
Cuba (Caibarién): 10ft -nearby Isabela de Sagua had water reach 1.2miles inland
FL Keys: Big Pine Key 8ft
FL Mainland: 6-10ft between Cape Sable (near S tip of FL) and Cape Romano (near Marco Island)
FL Mainland: Everglades City 7.5ft
FL Mainland: Downtown Jacksonville St. Johns River combined rainfall flooding and onshore winds pushing ocean down river - 5.3ft


Rainfall(max):
Puerto Rico: 10-15in
Cuba: 23.90in
FL: Ft. Pierce 21.66in
GA: Nahunta 10.34in
SC: Beaufort 9.07in
AL: 5in
NC: 6in

Tornadoes:
25 confirmed: 21 FL, 4 SC
7 EFO rating
15 EF1 rating
3 EF2 rating

Deaths:
44 "Direct" deaths:
Barbados: 1
Barbuda: 3
St. Martin / Sint Maarten / St. Barthelemy: 15
Anguilla: 1
British VI: 4
US VI: 3
Haiti: 1
Cuba: 9
US: 7 (FL: 4: 3 drowned, 1 fall; GA: 2: Trees falling; SC: 1: Tree falling)

85 "Indirect Deaths": 80 were in FL (Combinations of: Falls prepping, car accidents, carbon monoxide via generators, chainsaws, & electrocutions were all the main causes - wasn't broken down in report)


Damage/Economic Loss Estimates:
Barbuda: $150-300mln
Saint Martin / Sint Maarten: $1bln
St. Barthelemy: $480mln
Anguilla: $190mln
US/British VI: Not Listed
Puerto Rico: Not Listed
Turks & Caicos: $500mln
The Bahamas: Not Listed
Dominican Republic / Haiti: Not Listed
Cuba: $200mln
US: $50bln

Last edited by Psychoma; 03-12-2018 at 09:37 PM..
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