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Old 03-21-2008, 07:59 AM
 
139 posts, read 547,850 times
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If a person lives in a concrete block home that is built to the new codes, would their home likely be able to withstand the worst, a CAT 5 hurricane?

I saw a picture somewhere, maybe on this forum, of well-built homes left intact right next to an area of poorly built homes that were demolished.

It was encouraging to see that these homes were left standing in a low-lying area.

I always hear how 'if a CAT 5 storm comes, forget it'---yet, these homes were still standing and this was 1992 before the new codes and were not the precast concrete, poured concrete homes that are supposed to be super-strong. Probably concrete homes, though.

So, I am wondering if my concerns about living in Sarasota (near the Interstate) are not as dire as I think.

It may be the high cost of homeowners' insurance that is also making me feel worried about living near a coastal area.
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Old 03-21-2008, 10:13 AM
 
38 posts, read 133,058 times
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The majority of the homes in Florida are made of concrete block. Speaking from my experience from Hrricane Andrew in 1992, my parents home, roof withstood the winds, it was built in 1985. Shingles did fly off causing water to leak iinto the attic and bring down the ceiling inside and damage walls.

Depending on who you ask, everyone had a different experience with that hurricane. I was only 2 miles from where the eye passed.

Doesnt matter where in Fl you move to, you are prone to Hurricanes, now hurricanes do not hit or threatened Fl every year like many northerners might think. I think you will get a a blizzard or maybe a damaging winter storm more than Fl will get a direct hit
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Old 03-21-2008, 12:14 PM
 
Location: TN
71 posts, read 381,951 times
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Honestly, a CAT 5 can and has taken down even concrete block homes. No home is completely "safe". With that said, they are nothing to worry about. I lived in Florida on the coast for 24 years and none of my homes was ever damaged by a hurricane. Plenty of peoples' homes were destroyed in that time, but chances are you will be fine. I was always much more worried about the tornados spawned by hurricanes or severe weather than I was about hurricanes. Even a weak tornado can level your house if it hits it. I am a very nervous person but I can honestly say I wouldn't stress about hurricanes. If it makes you feel better, have a safe room installed. They have some awesome ones for under 10K and they'll give you peace of mind.
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Old 03-26-2008, 08:21 AM
 
13,773 posts, read 35,104,408 times
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I went through Miami a year after Andrew hit and what struck me were the trees that had been broken halfway up.

I think many ppl think of Katrina (F5) now a days, but it wasn't the wind that did the major damage to houses it was the water.
Like DomHPD stated, you may loose your roof, windows or have tree fall on it but the chances are slim your home will blow away.
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Old 03-27-2008, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,555,647 times
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Basically, unless you have a POURED concrete roof you can get roof damage. Even a well built home can be swamped by storm surge- the house would be standing but everyone drowns, not good. Wood roofs vary in storm resistance, the best have been covered with cemented gravel or well-attatched steel roofing, the worst are shingles or clay tiles. A cat 5 hurricane could be weaker in some areas, and the orientation of a structure affects damage. I have seen after Andrew cheap wooden homes levelled with one still standing with minor damage- the same construction as the others. There were homes undamaged by Donna and wrecked by Andrew, and despite stronger winds my parents home suffered less damage in Andrew than in Katrina/Wilma. A major Florida city has not been hit by a healthy hurricane since 1926, so the chances of it happening again are pretty slim. Most other hits have been to less populated areas, or from fringes of storms so its not much worse than a healthy thunderstorm.
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Old 03-29-2008, 08:30 AM
 
139 posts, read 547,850 times
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Default thanks for replies

Thanks, everyone, for your insights.

There is a lot of randomness in how homes are affected by hurricanes, no rhyme or reason sometimes.
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Old 03-29-2008, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 20,494,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roaring-rox View Post
If a person lives in a concrete block home that is built to the new codes, would their home likely be able to withstand the worst, a CAT 5 hurricane?

I saw a picture somewhere, maybe on this forum, of well-built homes left intact right next to an area of poorly built homes that were demolished.

It was encouraging to see that these homes were left standing in a low-lying area.

I always hear how 'if a CAT 5 storm comes, forget it'---yet, these homes were still standing and this was 1992 before the new codes and were not the precast concrete, poured concrete homes that are supposed to be super-strong. Probably concrete homes, though.

So, I am wondering if my concerns about living in Sarasota (near the Interstate) are not as dire as I think.

It may be the high cost of homeowners' insurance that is also making me feel worried about living near a coastal area.
I went through Hurricane Andrew in a home built in 1982-83 by my father (CBS well built extra hurricane staps, etc), and it survived hurricane Andrew cat 5. The roof, walls, us, windows were fine. With the exception of the french doors in the kitchen which had been hit by parts of a neighbors detached garage. And the rain dripping through the light fixtures/fans (because of the ridge vent on the roof) which ruined the carpets. Everything outside in the yard was gone. So yes you can survive a cat 5 storm. Those homes that went through Katrina were all wood homes (which is crazy and some are rebuilding with wood again guess they haven't learned anything from Florida) and they got hit by the surge (which we in South Florida rarely have like they did) We have surge just as bad usually.

The picture you saw, you can't tell (unless you know the subdivision name) how well that home was built or not. Because hurricanes have tornadoes in them, and so that home could of been hit by a tornado during the hurricane. They say Hurricane Andrew had many tornadoes in it. And nothing will survive a tornado.
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Old 04-22-2008, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Panama city beach fl
12 posts, read 62,637 times
Reputation: 15
Default Mother Nature

Quote:
Originally Posted by roaring-rox View Post
If a person lives in a concrete block home that is built to the new codes, would their home likely be able to withstand the worst, a CAT 5 hurricane?

I saw a picture somewhere, maybe on this forum, of well-built homes left intact right next to an area of poorly built homes that were demolished.

It was encouraging to see that these homes were left standing in a low-lying area.

I always hear how 'if a CAT 5 storm comes, forget it'---yet, these homes were still standing and this was 1992 before the new codes and were not the precast concrete, poured concrete homes that are supposed to be super-strong. Probably concrete homes, though.

So, I am wondering if my concerns about living in Sarasota (near the Interstate) are not as dire as I think.

It may be the high cost of homeowners' insurance that is also making me feel worried about living near a coastal area.

Lets make this simple yes a stronger house is better, in saying that the simple fact is....If mother nature wants it, she will take it.
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Old 04-22-2008, 04:39 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 42,823,332 times
Reputation: 10988
I've seen brick buildings torn apart after Charley and friends hit in 2004...but I don't know if it was the hurricanes or the reported tornadoes that did it.
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