U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-15-2007, 03:27 AM
 
8 posts, read 37,200 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

Alot of people are relocating to Florida on this site, including me. For someone who has never lived on the coast or anywhere near it, What do you do with a Hurricane Watch and Warning? How do you protect your home? How hard is it to evacuate? When do you evacuate? Share stories of your experiences too.

Thanks to All
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-15-2007, 05:20 AM
 
1,775 posts, read 7,539,350 times
Reputation: 796
Well when a hurricane is coming, believe me, it's all over the news down here on what to do. but the basics is have plenty of drinking water on hand and food you can cook on a grill or food you can eat without needing to heat it in case you lose power. We had lost power in the middle of August for 5 days and it was horrible. Hot as can be, no place to buy Ice as it was sold out. we did have food for the grill though. Don't count on restaurants to eat at. McDonalds even ran out of food and the other restaurants as well. Fill up on gasoline cause no power, no gas pumping. Be sure to buy some ice bags a few days before the store comes. We were dying for just a cold drink. To prepare, most people board up their windows on their homes with plywood but if you can afford it, they do sell window shutters you can buy for your home. Just pick up everything in your yard that might be blown around in the wind. If you plan to leave, leave at least 3 days before the storm comes. depending on where you live, you may get stuck in traffic jams. This is especially true with people fleeing the coastal areas. I've seen traffic jams backed up for 10 hours to go 5 miles before but now FL has a plan to open up some interstate roads to have both lanes going in the same direction to help ease the jams. We invested in a power generator so we can at least have the TV running to know whats going outside and maybe our fridge. We lost all our food so now when i know a storm is coming usually a week or so before, i won't stock up the fridge. just eat whats in there cause you never know if you lose power, how long it will take to get back and you lose all of it. so to sum it up, stock up on food and water, buy some plywood for your windows, pick up things in your yard, if you leave and need to stay in a hotel, be sure to reserve well in advance because most hotels sell out quick especially inland, fill up in gas for your car cause gas stations will go down if power fails and have plenty of cash on hand.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,591,606 times
Reputation: 4951
What to do? Start praying it hits Miami or Ft Lauderdale and not where you live! At least in south Florida there's nothing really nice left to be damaged.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 05:38 AM
 
Location: NE Florida
17,835 posts, read 30,722,542 times
Reputation: 43321
daniellefort
great post, good information

and dont forget to have a manual can opener
You can also find sites that will give you an actual list of what to have in your Hurricane kit.

Be informed and be prepared.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 07:42 AM
 
1,343 posts, read 4,805,741 times
Reputation: 861
I've only evacuated once in 45 years. That was for Floyd in '99. I lived in a poorly constructed condo on the beach and Floyd was expected to be a cat 5 when it made landfall. I went inland to Gainesville, (normally about a 90 minute drive,)and it took 7 hours. We now live in "The Bunker," a concrete block home built in 1949, about 10 miles from the beach. Our house is where everybody else comes when there's a warning! The local FEMA director had a safe room built into his house, he said we have a safe house!

If you can't afford a generator, get an inverter, which you can hook up to your car. In 2004, we lost power for a week, but were able to save our food, our neighbors food, make coffee and watch TV, of course not all at the same time. Make sure you have plenty of gas and don't wait until the last minute. Water, radio, flashlights, batteries, meds, food, playing cards, a grill and charcoal or propane. Your local newspaper, tv station, grocery stores all have lists of what you need and what you need to do. If you decide to evacuate, do it early, or you will be stuck on the interstate highways, which become parking lots.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 07:47 AM
 
2,313 posts, read 2,597,430 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFwife1983 View Post
Alot of people are relocating to Florida on this site, including me. For someone who has never lived on the coast or anywhere near it, What do you do with a Hurricane Watch and Warning? How do you protect your home? How hard is it to evacuate? When do you evacuate? Share stories of your experiences too.

Thanks to All
When the storm actually comes, there should not be anything left for you to do. Everything needs to be well planned in advance and already done. After the storm you can walk around and see what caused the damage. Mostly it comes from trees that have not been trimmed or removed all together. Last year just at the start of hurricane season I had my roofer get on all my roofs and just take a walk around and do what ever was needed. He replaced a few shingles and did some sealing around the chimney, cost me like $200.

Roof damage can begin with one small possibly preventable failure that the wind can exploit causing roof and water damage. We lost our electric and Internet for almost two weeks after Wilma. Turned out the whole problem was caused by one Ficus tree that had taken out the whole system by us, completely preventable. Old and rotting poles came down that should have been replaced years earlier but never were. People who need shutters have a lot of time to get them but it never fails you see them trying to buy materials as the storm is a day away. There are a few materials you can make storm panels from. I have common 3/4 inch plywood panels I made years ago that are all numbered and fitted to each window.

They have a storage spot that is easy to get to when they are needed and they go up very easy, (except for their weight). I didn't build these in a weekend. I did a window or two at a time when I could and by spreading the cost over a period of time they won't put any financial strain on you. The point is, I have no fear of hurricanes.

My house is strong and everything is done in advance to give us the best shot of going through a storm with minimal damage. It is bad enough to have damage, but damage that is your own fault and didn't have to happen I have no sympathy for and I am sorry to say, that is a lot of what you will see after a storm, damage that should never have happened.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 09:42 AM
 
Location: SE Florida
9,362 posts, read 23,444,877 times
Reputation: 9352
If you purchase a generator, NEVER RUN IT INDOORS. There have been a number of deaths due to carbon monoxide poisoning from indoor generator use. This means even the garage- generators must be housed outdoors when in use.

Also, not sure what it is called, but if you are buying a home, they can fit it with a plug for a generator. Can retrofit, too, I believe.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Downtown Orlando, FL
631 posts, read 2,278,902 times
Reputation: 293
Quote:
Originally Posted by macguy View Post
When the storm actually comes, there should not be anything left for you to do. Everything needs to be well planned in advance and already done. After the storm you can walk around and see what caused the damage. Mostly it comes from trees that have not been trimmed or removed all together. Last year just at the start of hurricane season I had my roofer get on all my roofs and just take a walk around and do what ever was needed. He replaced a few shingles and did some sealing around the chimney, cost me like $200.

Roof damage can begin with one small possibly preventable failure that the wind can exploit causing roof and water damage. We lost our electric and Internet for almost two weeks after Wilma. Turned out the whole problem was caused by one Ficus tree that had taken out the whole system by us, completely preventable. Old and rotting poles came down that should have been replaced years earlier but never were. People who need shutters have a lot of time to get them but it never fails you see them trying to buy materials as the storm is a day away. There are a few materials you can make storm panels from. I have common 3/4 inch plywood panels I made years ago that are all numbered and fitted to each window.

They have a storage spot that is easy to get to when they are needed and they go up very easy, (except for their weight). I didn't build these in a weekend. I did a window or two at a time when I could and by spreading the cost over a period of time they won't put any financial strain on you. The point is, I have no fear of hurricanes.

My house is strong and everything is done in advance to give us the best shot of going through a storm with minimal damage. It is bad enough to have damage, but damage that is your own fault and didn't have to happen I have no sympathy for and I am sorry to say, that is a lot of what you will see after a storm, damage that should never have happened.
Did your plywood not warp? In 2004 all 3 hurricanes I had to buy new plywood because the intense winds/rain warped them. I was told that warped plywood was not safe?

Hurricance clips work well too. I swear - no one knows how much it sucks to drill holes all over your brand new house...only to have to fill them, and repain the house. Then do it all over again a month later! I remember between the last two that hit, my entire neighborhood just left their plywood up for a month solid.

And to be fair, before Charley no one in central Florida had a passing thought that a hurricane would do damage there. But by the time the second one hit, people were serious. So it really wasn't neglect the first time.

Then it got so redundant hearing on TV "you're all gonna die! They have body-sniffing dogs on standby!!" (paraphrasing of course).

My home in St. Cloud had a lot of damage and was less than 6 months old.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,591,606 times
Reputation: 4951
The good thing about hurricanes is that you have plenty of warning, unlike tornadoes. As long as you are away from the storm surge, danger is from wind only, which you can survive as long as nothing falls on you.I would rather deal with hurricanes than a powerful earthquake. Not sure how Californians live with that ever-present danger.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2007, 11:16 AM
 
2,313 posts, read 2,597,430 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueoktober View Post
Did your plywood not warp? In 2004 all 3 hurricanes I had to buy new plywood because the intense winds/rain warped them. I was told that warped plywood was not safe?

Hurricance clips work well too. I swear - no one knows how much it sucks to drill holes all over your brand new house...only to have to fill them, and repain the house. Then do it all over again a month later! I remember between the last two that hit, my entire neighborhood just left their plywood up for a month solid.

And to be fair, before Charley no one in central Florida had a passing thought that a hurricane would do damage there. But by the time the second one hit, people were serious. So it really wasn't neglect the first time.

Then it got so redundant hearing on TV "you're all gonna die! They have body-sniffing dogs on standby!!" (paraphrasing of course).

My home in St. Cloud had a lot of damage and was less than 6 months old.
After like 12 or 15 years not a bit, flat as a pool able. When not in use they store upright and stacked tight against each other and secured. There is also different grades of plywood. You can buy real crap not worth the time to spend working with. What thickness did you use by the way?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top