U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-22-2007, 08:16 PM
 
Location: NY/ FL
267 posts, read 1,066,769 times
Reputation: 90

Advertisements

Hi everyone,
After seeing all of the hurricane evac info on here, it got me to thinkin'. We are buying new construction inventory. We have no experience with hurricane weather whatsoever. Are there any steps that we need to take or precautions that need to be done to get our new home ready for the storm season?? I only have experience shoveling lots of snow!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-23-2007, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 29,003,930 times
Reputation: 7173
I can't believe nobody has answered this yet.

People all prepare differently, but there are some general guidelines.

Make sure that you have plenty of non perishable food. I think the rule if thumb is 2 gallons of water per person per day. They tell you to have enough for 48 hours, but I always had a weeks worth. Every week when I did my grocery shopping I would pick up some hurricane stash. That way I was not out right before a storm.

If anyone takes prescription meds you will need to have an adequate supply. I know that the insurance company does not care to let you stock up, but something to be aware of. Also have some first aid supplies.

Have some cash. If the power is out the ATM won't work.

Have a portable radio & plenty of batteries, flashlight, candles.

I always kept a few cans of Sterno for heating up some food. A charcoal grill with a few bags of charcoal works too.

If you have a generator, make sure that your gas cans are full.

Make sure that you know how to put up your hurricane shutters.

If a storm is headed for you bring in EVERYTHING in your yard. Even small things can become high speed projectiles.

I never had to use my hurricane stash, but I always felt better knowing it was there if I needed it.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 08:17 AM
 
1,775 posts, read 7,527,785 times
Reputation: 785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minniemom View Post
Hi everyone,
After seeing all of the hurricane evac info on here, it got me to thinkin'. We are buying new construction inventory. We have no experience with hurricane weather whatsoever. Are there any steps that we need to take or precautions that need to be done to get our new home ready for the storm season?? I only have experience shoveling lots of snow!
If you can afford them, hurricane shutters for your windows would be a good investment.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 08:31 AM
 
4,422 posts, read 6,446,520 times
Reputation: 10872
With new construction, you will be fine. Your home will come with builder supplied hurricane shutters. Evey has some good pointers. We were here for Wilma. We stayed in our home through the hurricane and once we saw that there was no damage we left until the power was back on. We found this easier than stocking up and 'camping' inside.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 08:37 AM
 
93 posts, read 344,989 times
Reputation: 42
Secure everything in the yard, I toss the lanai furniture into the pool. FIll up the propane tanks and tie the BBQ to something solid, you may not have a kitchen the next day. CASH, GAS, WATER, FOOD...do not store gasoline indoors. I have 4 huge blue tarps, 2 buckets of roofing nails, 1X2X8 wood strips to hold the tarps down, 220' of 1/4 " yellow line, you'll need that to hold the tarps down while nailing.

I load the truck with water and food, CB radio, and a hand held marine VHF radio, battery powered screw gun and saw, batteries fully charged, chainsaw with premixed fuel, raincoats and basic clothing,CASH, VIP documents, a cooler full of ice,flashlights. With this done if the storm is really bad we head to the local Elks lodge, it is a designated hurricane shelter.

Steel storm shutters are great and are not difficult to install yourself. Forget about trying to buy plywood the day before the storm, most places are sold out or will only give you a few sheets. ANticipate on surviving on your own for about two days before the Nat'l Guard or others come to help. Have a battle plan, know your way out and prepare before it hits the fan.

Been there, done that, got the T shirt....lost my house to Hurricane Charley in 2004

Last edited by Arrgh; 02-23-2007 at 08:46 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 08:44 AM
 
Location: a primitive state
10,273 posts, read 21,160,473 times
Reputation: 13659
There was a fantastic thread on the subject a few weeks ago.

//www.city-data.com/forum/flori...ight=hurricane

If you ever want to get instant results on a question, use the "search" option at the top of the page first.

For example: Go to search, click "advanced," select the Florida forum, and enter the term "hurricane". You'll find a lot of info that way - then you can start a thread asking more specific questions if you didn't learn what you needed to.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 07:35 PM
 
Location: NY/ FL
267 posts, read 1,066,769 times
Reputation: 90
WOW!

Thanks so much for all of the information. I can't believe I am moving to a place that I have to be that much prepared for disaster. Why am I moving there again? Oh yea, job transfer!!

My husband laughs at me, but when we went house hunting, I always commented on a big closet that could be used as a safe room. Thats a good point to stock up on stuff everytime you go food shopping. I know what a small snow storm does to the supermarkets here on LI, I don't even want to think about trying to get supplies when a hurricane is on it's way.

I think what scrares me most is the fact that my husband travels for work and is away for days at a time. I am petrified (sp) to think that a hurricane could be predicted and my husband not be able to get home to help me prepare and deal with my 3 kids.

Do all new construction homes come with storm shutters? I didn't know that. I just thought that you had to get them yourself. I guess they would come pre-fit???

Thanks so much for all the info. I think I am going to print out the replies and keep them safe.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2007, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,723,655 times
Reputation: 2995
Hurricanes do happen - be prepared instead of surprised - plan ahead.

Basic items/categories you should stock for an emergency include:

1. Water
2. Food
3. First Aid Supplies
4. Clothing/Bedding
5. Tools & Emergency supplies
6. Special Items

Now is the time to go over your hurricane preparedness. If you have not made any emergency plans, you should do them now. Planning ahead will save you unnecessary stress from not knowing what to do or not having the supplies you will need to get you through the hurricane watch, warning, storm, and aftermath. Print and post this list on the refrigerator or somewhere it will be easily seen.

Plan Well Before Hurricane Season

Create An Emergency Plan

Discuss with family members what could happen

Discuss where to meet

Discuss what to do if an evacuation is needed

Discuss shelters/rules

Discuss what to do with family pets

Discuss how to protect elderly

Review the above Emergency Plan with your family every 3 to 6 months

Review Dates

1. __/__/__

2. __/__/__

Stored Supplies

Replace stored water every three months

1. __/__/__

2. __/__/__

Replace stored food every six months

1. __/__/__

2. __/__/__

Replace stored batteries

Test fire extinguishers according to instructions
Store your supplies in a convenient, dry place.
Review your supply needs yearly.
Keep items in air tight plastic bags.
Replace clothing articles for growing children.

Supplies to Have on Hand
A large, clean garbage can in which you can store your supplies until needed. This can also be used to store clean water for use during the storm.

CASH if the electricity goes out no automatic tellers will work.

Credit cards.

Identification/Valuable papers/documents

Drinking water for 5-10 days (1 gallon/person/day). Do not use milk containers that will break or decompose; use plastic soda bottles.

Canned/packaged food (1-2 weeks).

Canned meats, canned fish, canned fruits & vegetables, canned juices, dried fruit, bread, crackers, peanut butter, jelly and bottled water. Try to purchase in one meal packages, once opened they will spoil quickly.

Sugar, salt, pepper.

Coffee, tea bags.

Hard candy, especially for diabetics.

Special dietary foods.

Baby food/formula/diapers.

Food and medication for pets.

Toilet paper/paper towels/personal items/baby diapers.

Shampoo, soap, toothpaste, toothbrush.

One change of clothing and footwear per person.

Two-week supply of prescription medicine.

Extra pair of glasses/contacts.

Aspirin/First Aid Kit.

Suntan Lotion.

Mosquito Repellant.

Non-electric can opener


Two portable coolers one for food; one for ice.

Battery-operated radio or TV.

Eating utensils/paper plates, cups, plasticware.

2-3 flashlights/extra batteries.

Lantern with fuel.

Bleach (for disinfecting).

Tarps.

Trash bags.

Matches (waterproof) and candles.

Fire extinguisher.

100 feet of rope.

Sleeping bags/blankets.

Duct tape.

Plywood/tools (hammer, screwdriver, nails, etc.).

Camp stove with extra fuel.

Extra car and house keys.

Car tire sealant.

Rain gear.

Books, cards, games, toys, etc. (for children).

Charcoal/ice. § Clean-up supplies (mop, bucket, towels, disinfectant).

Camera and film.

Other Items You May Need

Compass

Signal flares

Needles, thread


Medicine dropper

Whistle

Plastic sheeting

Map of the area

Utility knife

Tent

Hammer, pliers, screwdriver, saw

Aluminum foil, plastic storage containers

Disinfectant
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2007, 07:46 AM
 
1,775 posts, read 7,527,785 times
Reputation: 785
[quote=Minniemom;397371]WOW!

Thanks so much for all of the information. I can't believe I am moving to a place that I have to be that much prepared for disaster. Why am I moving there again? Oh yea, job transfer!!


Well the good thing is that the hurricanes are watched a good week or even 2 weeks ahead of time and when there is one out there, believe me, it's all over the news for days because of the track it may or may not take. Also you will find supply lists everywhere you go. Newspapers, grocery stores, home supply stores. FL is very good at getting people prepared and making sure everyone knows what they need to do particularly for the new comers. A week in advance is the time to stock up on food, medicine, money and whatever else you don't already have supplied cause those last few days before the storm hits is terrible in the stores. Oh and make sure to get ice. We were out of power for 6 days in the middle of August and could not find any ice anywhere. Oh we were just dying for a cold drink of water. And don't count on going to a restaurant to eat. Our 2 McDonald's in town ran out of food as well as some other restaurants and the ones that had food.... forget it. 2 hour wait for a table. Sounds scary but really just be prepared well in advance and beat the last minute rush. You'll be alright.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2007, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Marion, IN
8,191 posts, read 29,003,930 times
Reputation: 7173
All new construction homes in FL come with hurricane shutters. On the outside of the windows you will see the studs, and the shutters will most likely be in the garage. They look like corrugated metal. My husband used to install shutters on new homes, the builder can not get a CO without them.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top