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Old 03-17-2007, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 20,372,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by verobeach View Post
Not true. We just spent two afternoons last weekend with a realtor from Eagle Harbor because we someday might want to relocate to northern Florida. We were surprised to learn that this award winning development does NOT adhere to any hurricane codes. No cement block construction, no reinforced garage doors, and no builder supplied hurricane shutters. The homes are wood framed and though they do have the proper roof trusses, that's about it. If a hurricane were to hit JAX, it would be nothing but a pile of sticks. Let's hope Mother Nature keeps protecting it from hurricanes.
After going through Hurricane Andrew, I don't know how all of Florida isn't Concret Block Stone (CBS). And how the coastal states don't do the same. Watching homes in Katrina hit areas being built once again with stick, just scares me to death and boggles my mind (they must not know), just why, it is only 10% more to build with CBS.

One of the communites that was hit the hardest by Andrew, was a stick built community that is 15 miles inland, I wish more people could see pictures of what happend to these homes. My parents CBS home which they built, was standing with the roof and walls intact (the northeren eye wall of Andrew went over the house) So it shows as long as a tornado doesn't hit a well built CBS house, they survive compared to any stick built home that get demolished. I have friends in Odessa Florida that bought a brand new home a few years ago, that is stick and they don't have shutters, and plan to stay in the house with their 3 kids during hurricanes. they haven't been through anything more than a Cat1 so they just don't know.

If you are looking for a home, buy CBS and make sure their are shutters not just a film on the windows, real shutters.
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Old 03-17-2007, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Wellington, FL
65 posts, read 244,351 times
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I have been through 3 major hurricanes (2004 & 2005). Suffered tree loss, power outages and inconvience but no damage to home. I live 20 miles from the ocean in WPB.
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Old 03-17-2007, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
518 posts, read 2,040,349 times
Reputation: 265
Quote:
Originally Posted by verobeach View Post
Not true. We just spent two afternoons last weekend with a realtor from Eagle Harbor because we someday might want to relocate to northern Florida. We were surprised to learn that this award winning development does NOT adhere to any hurricane codes. No cement block construction, no reinforced garage doors, and no builder supplied hurricane shutters. The homes are wood framed and though they do have the proper roof trusses, that's about it. If a hurricane were to hit JAX, it would be nothing but a pile of sticks. Let's hope Mother Nature keeps protecting it from hurricanes.
If this is true, it sounds like either there is a lot of misinformation circulating about which areas are covered by the statewide building code or that this developer is trying to pull a fast one.

Here is a quote from the American Society of Civil Engineers' Web site: "The state building code, adopted in 2000, requires that new homes be built with hurricane shutters or impact-resistant glass. As a compromise to get the code passed in the legislature, lawmakers granted Franklin County and all the counties to its west an exemption from the shutter requirement." (Doesn't say anything about concrete block construction.)

According to the reports in the media (which often gets things wrong, let's face it) over the past few years, the only area exempt from the statewide building code requiring shutters/upgraded windows was the Panhandle/northwest Florida -- and the state Legislature dropped that exemption in January.

But if my original post about Jacksonville was wrong, I stand corrected. If anyone knows for sure exactly where the state building code does and doesn't apply to anything built from the mid-'90s on, please post that information! It could make a difference for somebody looking to move to Florida.

Last edited by chisoxfan; 03-17-2007 at 12:09 PM..
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