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Old 03-26-2007, 08:07 AM
 
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[quote=tallrick;497683]
Quote:
Originally Posted by summergal View Post
It may help the stress of worrying the house would blow away but it wouldn't even touch the stress the insurance rates afterwards would cause![/QUOTE

Well if you do not have insurance it doesn't apply does it?
What will solve the insurance problem is doing away with replacement values. If the insurance company could just sell you what you need and you assume the remaining risk it would be no problem, sort of like life insurance. You should be able to buy say $25,000 or $50,000 to cover possible damage or the amount of your outstanding mortgage. You would not go uninsured just not have replacement value which is inflated anyway. I think it is that easy to fix this thing.
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Old 03-26-2007, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Vero Beach, Fl
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Getting back to the original question - Yes, and we are taking steps to make this happen.

We are installing hurricane windows - we know the pros and cons, etc.
We are installing a generator and securing to avoid theft
Our trees aren't a problem because Wilma took care of that
Our home is CBS
If something happens to our roof in the next "big one" we already have our plan b in place.

But you are right about home construction. If you take all the communities along the coast line and construct cbs/concrete houses, I wonder how many would still be standing today after all the hurricanes that have hit these areas. Along Mississippi, etc. they are still replacing with more wood homes -- how foolish is that?

We were looking in and around Gainesville some months back and there are only a few cbs homes there while the rest are wood. New developments there, Orlando and multiple areas are still building wood frame homes. Builders, communities, and local governments - actually the entire state should set the same standard as we have in South Florida. These are just my thoughts.
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Old 03-26-2007, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
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And you eliminate wood problems like termites, and having to replace the roofing every 10-15 years. Wood is a horrible material for construction in subtropical climates, but builders are not going to try something new and have to fight with building officials. Homeowners care more about a certain "look" than what goes into the homes. I prefer a box as long as I know the concrete and steel are in there.
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Old 04-05-2007, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
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My preference is to live in a hurricane-prone area and have a hurricane proof house. It's just insane to live in a cheap pile of sticks with shingles and drywall. Even dumber to fill that with valuables. A hurricane, tornado, or fire will reduce it to debris or charcoal. There's absolutely no reason not to build a home that can last a lifetime without structural problems or outside maintenance. As soon as you add wood to it, you lose.
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Old 04-05-2007, 02:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
And you eliminate wood problems like termites, and having to replace the roofing every 10-15 years. Wood is a horrible material for construction in subtropical climates, but builders are not going to try something new and have to fight with building officials. Homeowners care more about a certain "look" than what goes into the homes. I prefer a box as long as I know the concrete and steel are in there.
After hurricane Andrew there were many homes standing that were almost untouched other the shingles and other small damage. Many were older homes that were simple square homes sitting on like a 40 x 40 ft. foot print with a simple hip roof. No big feet of engineering just common sense design. The houses that blew apart were for the most part were the type with milti level gable roofs with valleys, dormers, overhangs and so on. They blew apart a lot due to the designs. Like you, I know I can build a house that will stand up to most any storm and it won't cost an arm and a leg either. I don't need any fancy building codes to do it. Just proven designs and some common sense.
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Old 04-05-2007, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Miami
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Did you see the stick built homes in Country Walk after Andrew built by Lennar, what was left the owners had to have torn down and rebuilt with CBS (concrete block stone), It is only 10% more on average to build a home with CBS, that is worth my safety. I would NEVER buy a home any place in Florida that is not CBS even inland. (This is coming from someone that had the eye of Hurricane Andrew come over my house, and the roof stayed intact)
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Old 04-05-2007, 02:32 PM
 
142 posts, read 744,012 times
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www.windtripper.com seems like an unobtrusive, affordable and clever product to help during high winds. I've no affiliation, but I'm thinking about trying this out myself.
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Old 04-05-2007, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macguy View Post
After hurricane Andrew there were many homes standing that were almost untouched other the shingles and other small damage. Many were older homes that were simple square homes sitting on like a 40 x 40 ft. foot print with a simple hip roof. No big feet of engineering just common sense design. The houses that blew apart were for the most part were the type with milti level gable roofs with valleys, dormers, overhangs and so on. They blew apart a lot due to the designs. Like you, I know I can build a house that will stand up to most any storm and it won't cost an arm and a leg either. I don't need any fancy building codes to do it. Just proven designs and some common sense.
There were three shacks on 137AVE near Hainlin Mill Dr (216 st) that sustained no hurricane damage, but they were little cracker shacks. At my old house the metal shed was still standing when all other failed- I had reinforced it with treated 2 x 4's and it survived just fine. My parents house still has the original tar and gravel roof which has never blown off in any hurricane from Donna forward. The bigger the structure, the greater the risk. A lot of the "approved" construction will fail anyway, as it's only rated up to 120MPH winds. If it wasn't for the hassles of Dade county, I would have replaced my parent's home with a concrete roof and all future problems would have gone away.
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Old 05-14-2007, 04:32 PM
 
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Thumbs up Yes it would

Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
There so many complaints about hurricanes, but what if you never had to worry about them? Let's say your home had a concrete roof, heavy-duty lexan windows, steel doors and was well reinforced. Homes in a flood zone were raised up, and you had a garage to secure your car and objects, and maybe a protected courtyard. All trees are tough natives, and you have a neighborhood mulcher, or your own for the cleanup. In short when you have a hurricane warning all you do is close the windows and check the generator, and fold over the solar panels. You can run the generator when power goes out, and/or backup batteries. After the storm you have full power, and plenty of food. Just spend the day picking up tree branches, mulching and cleaning up sand or mud. Next day all is done. You have plenty of fuel for a month without utility power, if necessary. Plenty of hot water and air conditioning. Would this make you feel better instead of living in a wood roof- crackerbox or dependant condo like most do now? Or is the thought of a hurricane the source of stress itself? Remember in my scenario your home WILL NOT be damaged.

By the way this IS possible if people learn how to build correctly, and do not have to worry about homeowners associations or elitist zoning.
Have a number of questions:

1. Was the roof pre-stressed slabs or poured?
2. Details? How is the roof attached to the walls? Thickness of concrete?
3. How is the roof sealed?
4. Is there an interior load bearing wall?

In short, how you do it?
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Old 05-14-2007, 06:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbravo View Post
Have a number of questions:

1. Was the roof pre-stressed slabs or poured?
2. Details? How is the roof attached to the walls? Thickness of concrete?
3. How is the roof sealed?
4. Is there an interior load bearing wall?

In short, how you do it?
Go to any building site and look at any mid floor poured slab, pretend that's the roof. I poured hundreds of them using forms. Most all condos I ever worked on we poured concrete slab roofs. Just build a house the way you build a parking garage and you have a strong house that isn't going anywhere.
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