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Old 04-05-2007, 04:13 PM
 
22 posts, read 68,850 times
Reputation: 11

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrico90 View Post
By now everyone knows that Florida can be hit by a hurricane. This should not be NEW news for any of us. What we must do is to be prepared and have a plan to leave the area if a CAT 3 or higher is coming our way (depending on your location).

If the prediction for hurricanes is high or low, does not matter. Be prepared to take action if Mother Nature decides to hit Florida like in 2004 and 2005. I hope that nothing happen, but I have a plan to evacuate and survive for many years after this hurricane season and I do hope that everyone develops plans accordingly.
As a newer resident to Florida, how about some suggestions on preparing? I read quite a bit before moving but some real hints would help. I lived in Pa and have been through floods, blizzards, tornadoes and some pretty bad tropical storms.
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Old 04-05-2007, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996
Quote:
Originally Posted by joylynn100 View Post
As a newer resident to Florida, how about some suggestions on preparing? I read quite a bit before moving but some real hints would help. I lived in Pa and have been through floods, blizzards, tornadoes and some pretty bad tropical storms.

Here you go...


Before a Hurricane

* Know where you will go if you have to evacuate.

* Plan your evacuation route.

Contact the local emergency management office or other disaster preparedness organization, and ask for the community hurricane preparedness plan. This plan should include information on the safest evacuation route and nearby shelters. This information can also be obtained by visiting County's Hurricane Preparation web pages.

* Have disaster supplies on hand in the event of a storm, or if you have to evacuate:

Flashlight and extra batteries
Portable, battery-operated radio and extra batteries
First aid kit and first aid manual (click here for a first aid checklist)
Food (non-perishable) and water (one gallon of water per person per day)
Non-electric can opener
Essential medicines
Baby supplies (diapers, non-perishable milk, baby food)

If you are ordered to evacuate, you should also take:

Personal items, such as toilet paper, toothbrush, towel, tampons, soap
Books, small games and other small entertainment items
Important papers and valuables in a waterproof container
Names and addresses of relatives, friends and other important contacts
Clothing and bedding
Cash and credit cards
Sturdy shoes

* Make arrangements for pets.

Pets may not be allowed into emergency shelters for health and space reasons. Contact your local humane society for information on local animal shelters.

* Make plans for your boat.

Decide what to do with your boat if a storm hits. Choices include taking it out of the path of danger, securing it on a trailer and leaving it parked in a safe area, securing it in a marina or mooring it in a "safe" harbor. If you decide to leave the Keys with your boat, make sure to leave early because after the advent of storm force winds, trailers will no longer be allowed on the highway.

* Protect valuable documents and property, including:

Birth certificates
Marriage certificates
Social security cards
Passports
Immunization records
Bank account and credit card numbers
Photos/video of your home and valuable property
Vehicle titles
Military service papers
Wills
Insurance policies, including personal, homeowners and disaster insurance
Deeds
Stocks
Bonds
Irreplaceable photos
Computer back up of important electronic data
Jewelry

* Make sure that all family members know how to respond after a hurricane. Teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water.
* Teach children how and when to call 911, police, or fire department and which radio station to tune to for emergency information.
* Protect your windows.

Permanent shutters are the best protection. A lower-cost approach is to put up plywood panels. Use 1/2 inch plywood--marine plywood is best--cut to fit each window. Remember to mark which board fits which window. Pre-drill holes every 18 inches for screws. Do this long before the storm.

* Trim back dead or weak branches from trees. Trim coconuts from palms so they don't become deadly missiles during a storm.
* Check into disaster insurance.

If you do not already have flood and windstorm insurance, you should consider getting it. Remember: Windstorm insurance policies are not sold when a storm threatens, so think far enough ahead. You can find out about the National Flood Insurance Program through your local insurance agent or emergency management office. There is normally a 30-day waiting period before a new policy becomes effective. Homeowners polices do not cover damage from the flooding that accompanies a hurricane.

* Develop an emergency communication plan.

In case family members are separated from one another during a disaster (a real possibility during the day when adults are at work and children are at school), have a plan for getting back together. Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to serve as the "family contact." After a disaster, it's often easier to call long distance. Make sure everyone in the family knows the name, address, and phone number of the contact person.

* Take pictures of your house and property.

Take photos and/or video of your house, it's contents and the surrounding property. This will make it easier to prove loss to your insurance company following landfall.

Hurricane Watches and Warnings

Click here for information about storm classifications

A hurricane watch is issued when there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 36 hours. A hurricane warning is issued when hurricane conditions (winds of 74 miles per hour or greater, or dangerously high water and rough seas) are expected in 24 hours or less.
During a Hurricane Watch

* Listen to local radio or television stations for hurricane progress reports and emergency orders.
* Check emergency supplies.
* If you have not already done so, fuel your car.
* If you have not already done so, stock up on water, non-perishable food, water and ice.
* Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys, and garden tools and anchor objects that cannot be brought inside.
* Secure buildings by closing shutters and/or boarding up windows. Remove outside antennas.
* Turn refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary and close quickly.
* Fill bathtubs, washing machines, sinks and other containers with clean water.
* Review evacuation plan.
* Moor boat securely or move it to a designated safe place. Use rope or chain to secure boat to trailer. Use tie downs to anchor trailer to the ground or house.

During a Hurricane Warning

* Listen to local radio and television stations constantly for official instructions.
* If you are in a mobile home, check tie downs, then evacuate immediately to a safe location.
* Store valuables and personal papers in a waterproof container on the highest level of your home, or take them with you if you evacuate.
* Avoid elevators.

If you are at home:

* Stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors.
* Keep your emergency supply of flashlights and extra batteries handy. Avoid using open flames, such as candles and kerosene lamps, as a source of light.
* If power is lost, turn off major appliances to reduce power "surge" when electricity is restored.

If officials indicate evacuation is necessary:

* Secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve.
* Tell someone outside of the storm area where you are going.
* If time permits, and you live in an identified surge zone, elevate furniture to protect it from flooding or better yet, move it to a higher floor.
* Gather pre-assembled emergency supplies, warm protective clothing, blankets and sleeping bags. Review directions to the nearest shelter.
* Leave as soon as possible. Avoid flooded roads and watch for washed-out bridges.

After the Hurricane passes

* If you evacuated, return home only after authorities advise that it is safe to do so. Click here to see more information about Hurricane re-entry.
* If you evacuated, and your house has been vacant for a period of time, enter with caution.
* Stay tuned to local radio and/or television for information. Emergency officials will announce when you may return to your home, or when it is safe to venture outside
* Help injured or trapped persons if you can do so without injury to yourself. Give first aid where appropriate.
* Do not move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Call for help if possible, otherwise wait and help will come to you.
* Avoid loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately if possible to the power company, police, or fire department.
* Beware of snakes, insects, and animals driven to higher ground by flood water.
* Open windows and doors to ventilate and dry your home.
* Check refrigerated foods for spoilage.
* Drive only if absolutely necessary and avoid flooded roads and washed-out bridges.
* Use telephone only for emergency calls.
* Take pictures of the damage, both to the house and its contents and for insurance claims.
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Old 04-15-2007, 06:56 AM
 
1 posts, read 2,150 times
Reputation: 13
Default Hurricane

If the New Orleans levees had made it, probably no one today would be commenting on Katrina... Unfortunately, this year - with the jetstream like it is and the levees like they are - chances are we'll be talking again about hurricane devastation.
Same thing with the tornados... Houses are built with matchsticks and guess what ... they don't hold it. It looks like people have never heard of real houses in this country... made of bricks, stones and concrete. Why are the highrises still standing?
Same thing with snow storms... In the US, powerlines are hanging up in the air like in any other thrird world country... and break down.

No interest here at getting to the roots of the problems.
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Old 04-15-2007, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLFA View Post
If the New Orleans levees had made it, probably no one today would be commenting on Katrina... Unfortunately, this year - with the jetstream like it is and the levees like they are - chances are we'll be talking again about hurricane devastation.
Same thing with the tornados... Houses are built with matchsticks and guess what ... they don't hold it. It looks like people have never heard of real houses in this country... made of bricks, stones and concrete. Why are the highrises still standing?
Same thing with snow storms... In the US, powerlines are hanging up in the air like in any other thrird world country... and break down.

No interest here at getting to the roots of the problems.
I say this all the time. My home is all concrete, with a poured concrete roof, it's 1000 times better than a stupid, matchstick built house. No termites, rot and it's far quieter! I get paranoid going into any multi=story building made of wood, i think of it catching fire and it bothers me to be inside a pile of fuel. The only wood I would put in my home woule be two bowling lanes, that's it. Really dumb that few people ever build right, and even dumber that in places like Miami the building department fights you to prevent you from building right!

As for the power system, as an electrical engineer it frustrates me. We could make a disaster-prrof system but no one wants to spend the $$$. Main transmission lines have to be aboveground due to the high voltages- yet those with steel or concrete poles can survive any disaster, It's the ones comming from substations that usually fail, old run down wooden poles running through neighborhoods full of trees You know that FPL cares more about profits than a reliable system. They want it to fail.
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Old 04-15-2007, 08:20 AM
 
2,313 posts, read 2,590,850 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLFA View Post
If the New Orleans levees had made it, probably no one today would be commenting on Katrina... Unfortunately, this year - with the jetstream like it is and the levees like they are - chances are we'll be talking again about hurricane devastation.
Same thing with the tornados... Houses are built with matchsticks and guess what ... they don't hold it. It looks like people have never heard of real houses in this country... made of bricks, stones and concrete. Why are the highrises still standing?
Same thing with snow storms... In the US, powerlines are hanging up in the air like in any other thrird world country... and break down.

No interest here at getting to the roots of the problems.
I would say you sumed it up completely. Very nice first post, look forward to many future dialogs.
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Old 04-15-2007, 08:31 AM
 
Location: ~Palm Coast, Florida~
460 posts, read 2,202,454 times
Reputation: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
I say this all the time. My home is all concrete, with a poured concrete roof, it's 1000 times better than a stupid, matchstick built house. No termites, rot and it's far quieter! I get paranoid going into any multi=story building made of wood, i think of it catching fire and it bothers me to be inside a pile of fuel. The only wood I would put in my home woule be two bowling lanes, that's it. Really dumb that few people ever build right, and even dumber that in places like Miami the building department fights you to prevent you from building right!

As for the power system, as an electrical engineer it frustrates me. We could make a disaster-prrof system but no one wants to spend the $$$. Main transmission lines have to be aboveground due to the high voltages- yet those with steel or concrete poles can survive any disaster, It's the ones comming from substations that usually fail, old run down wooden poles running through neighborhoods full of trees You know that FPL cares more about profits than a reliable system. They want it to fail.
tallrick, is it more expensive to build a concrete house like yours? How much more so? Is your house the same type as the pretty "florida houses" I have seen? I think your type of house should be the standard for Florida personally. If i ever build there, it will be a concrete house for me! I dont want my house blowing away, LOL!

Jen
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Old 04-15-2007, 12:25 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,916,947 times
Reputation: 15120
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLFA View Post
If the New Orleans levees had made it, probably no one today would be commenting on Katrina... Unfortunately, this year - with the jetstream like it is and the levees like they are - chances are we'll be talking again about hurricane devastation.
Same thing with the tornados... Houses are built with matchsticks and guess what ... they don't hold it. It looks like people have never heard of real houses in this country... made of bricks, stones and concrete. Why are the highrises still standing?
Same thing with snow storms... In the US, powerlines are hanging up in the air like in any other thrird world country... and break down.

No interest here at getting to the roots of the problems.
Welcome to the forum and you have some very good points there. Tornadoes are one thing that will still cause devastation if you're right in their path, no matter what you live in. The Cat 4s and 5s in the central U.S. are very powerful storms.
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Old 04-15-2007, 01:52 PM
 
Location: The best country in the world: the USA
1,497 posts, read 4,540,432 times
Reputation: 728
Wink I was just thinking about that!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLFA View Post
If the New Orleans levees had made it, probably no one today would be commenting on Katrina... Unfortunately, this year - with the jetstream like it is and the levees like they are - chances are we'll be talking again about hurricane devastation.
Same thing with the tornados... Houses are built with matchsticks and guess what ... they don't hold it. It looks like people have never heard of real houses in this country... made of bricks, stones and concrete. Why are the highrises still standing?
Same thing with snow storms... In the US, powerlines are hanging up in the air like in any other thrird world country... and break down.

No interest here at getting to the roots of the problems.
It is interesting you say that about the powerlines. I am completely confused about WHY they still build powerlines above-ground!! I was in CO skiing in Feb and man, ALL the new areas have powerlines hanging up! "Why would they do that granted they get snowstorms"? Then I remembered my own neck of the woods (Central Florida) and remember the idiots do the same thing.

In fact, we had some crazy guy running from the cops this week and he slammed on a power pole and the lines feel down. >_< They had to cut people's power for a while to fix it. Lovely.

The "paper houses", as I call them, are a joke. Just today (Sunday) they had some tornadoes in Central Florida. Since we have tornadoes and hurricans frequently, why won't they build decent houses like Tallrick's?

Pathetic. This takes me back to my point: there is NO PLANNING IN FL. They just build crap in a hurry to make money and don't think about the consequences and never get the roads, schools, homes built properly. It is incredible.
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Old 04-15-2007, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by oceandreams94 View Post
tallrick, is it more expensive to build a concrete house like yours? How much more so? Is your house the same type as the pretty "florida houses" I have seen? I think your type of house should be the standard for Florida personally. If i ever build there, it will be a concrete house for me! I dont want my house blowing away, LOL!

Jen
In the late 80's with concrete at 22.00 a yard it was actually cheaper than using wood! The wood roof requires trusses, insulation, furring strips and the plywood. The roofing ( shingles tile, etc) is also expensive. With the concrete roof it's just steel and concrete. In a place with available fresh water you can top the roof with a plastic liner and add 6 inches of dirt, with grass or ground cover. You'll get great insulation at a low low cost, and never worry about a hurricane again! My roof also doubles as a huge patio and I put a sink and BBQ up there. Great place to escape the mosquitoes and look at the ocean. Why would anyone waste their money on wood?

The style of my house is not pretty but 50's modern. It's more of an urban look than the Florida vernacular or pseudo-mediterranean popular in Latin American areas like Miami. You could tailor a concrete structure for any style though. Beware of "cbs" construction, though. They often use an inferior wood roof. If you see soffit vents, run away fast, there's wood in there!
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Old 04-15-2007, 02:02 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 34,916,947 times
Reputation: 15120
Nirvana, where did the tornadoes hit?
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