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Old 04-15-2007, 04:49 PM
 
432 posts, read 1,761,606 times
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You know, back in andrew, the levees in NOLA barely held. No one was serious then about preventing the problem.


And sunrico, thanks for the list on hurricane preparedness. That is a keeper.
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Old 04-15-2007, 04:51 PM
 
432 posts, read 1,761,606 times
Reputation: 135
The 50s cbs houses are pretty sturdy - but yes, watch out for the roof. That is the main thing to look at there. Not just how things were in the 50s, but how they might have been replaced over the years.
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Old 04-15-2007, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
Reputation: 4934
My parent's home is a 50's CBS house with wood roof. The original gravel roof is hurricane resistant but the other homes have shingles or tile, which cannot withstand cat 3 or higher winds. People are just uneducated, and the county, Miami-Dade tries to discourage the use of tar and gravel roofs in residential areas. They want the homes to be damaged. Also 50's homes have a lower pitched roof, or flat. Those are the best for hurricanes, unlike the 80's and after high pitched roofs. If you see a gable end it must be concrete, or no more than 2 feet at the peak with wood from the tie beam. Stucco is used on low-quality work, the better ones had pine lap siding.

By the way, it is possible to build a home that can withstand even an F5 tornado. Trouble is that few people are intelligent enough to want one.
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,565,709 times
Reputation: 8850
Lightbulb yes-

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adream View Post
No, now you need to worry about living near the New Madrid Fault Line. It just goes to show, it's always something.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Fault_Line

and the year they predicted Charley they were way off anyway.

The fact is no one can predict-that is the problem. In the middle of 2004 Hurricane Charley they had it all wrong- we thought it would be nothing- and then - it changed its course- in less than 30 minutes. A hurricane or "nor éaster" is NOTHING up north, In Florida a hurricane can wipe out areas- people dont seem to want to face that.



sunny
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Old 04-16-2007, 06:36 AM
 
432 posts, read 1,761,606 times
Reputation: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
My parent's home is a 50's CBS house with wood roof. The original gravel roof is hurricane resistant but the other homes have shingles or tile, which cannot withstand cat 3 or higher winds. People are just uneducated, and the county, Miami-Dade tries to discourage the use of tar and gravel roofs in residential areas. They want the homes to be damaged. Also 50's homes have a lower pitched roof, or flat. Those are the best for hurricanes, unlike the 80's and after high pitched roofs. If you see a gable end it must be concrete, or no more than 2 feet at the peak with wood from the tie beam. Stucco is used on low-quality work, the better ones had pine lap siding.
My parents home was like this too. That tar/gravel roof withstood a lot. And the present owners of the house, while they have replaced it, have not gone with tile. But then, they are roofers!

I remember during the 1960 hurricane looking out the back window and seeing the gravel swirling around the house in the wind. But it did not break any windows. Just blew around and landed in the yard. Nothing close enough to it to be hit.
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Old 04-16-2007, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Rocket City, U.S.A.
1,806 posts, read 5,263,601 times
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I never have taken the warnings for granted, always being fully prepared for a hit...and if nothing happens - GREAT. But since the next one might not be so kind...
(33458 got nailed twice 2004-05)

joylynn100

If you stay put (not in an evacuation zone) please stock up on canned/dry goods, TP and drinking water for a FULL WEEK, not three days like some public announcements will recommend. Power could be out for a very long time.

Get gallon-sized heavy-duty ziplock bags and fill them half-way with water. Lay flat in the freezer.

The large grocery stores have emergency generators, but won't be restocked for a few days...

GAS UP EARLY. We tend to do this a day or two before everyone else and at odd hours of the morning (3-4 am) to avoid lines or shortages.

Fill the caulked tub as a reserve to flush toilets, etc. You might want to consider one of those rubber seals that go over the drain as an extra barrier...

BUG STUFF.

We have a small Coleman camping stove that has had more use outside our front door after the storm passed than it has in the mountains.
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Old 04-19-2007, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,734,157 times
Reputation: 2996
Lightbulb Up-and-coming N.C. State team predicts 8 to 9 hurricanes in '07

The up-and-coming hurricane research team that accurately predicted a mild 2006 storm season, despite the dire predictions of more established forecasters, say that the 2007 season will be much more active.

Researchers at North Carolina State University, in their third year of hurricane forecasting, said the Atlantic basin will brew eight to nine hurricanes, including four or five major hurricanes. Forecasters said there is a 75 percent chance a hurricane will make landfall along the eastern seaboard or hit the Gulf of Mexico coastline.
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Old 04-20-2007, 04:52 AM
 
22 posts, read 68,850 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by 33458 View Post
I never have taken the warnings for granted, always being fully prepared for a hit...and if nothing happens - GREAT. But since the next one might not be so kind...
(33458 got nailed twice 2004-05)

joylynn100

If you stay put (not in an evacuation zone) please stock up on canned/dry goods, TP and drinking water for a FULL WEEK, not three days like some public announcements will recommend. Power could be out for a very long time.

Get gallon-sized heavy-duty ziplock bags and fill them half-way with water. Lay flat in the freezer.

The large grocery stores have emergency generators, but won't be restocked for a few days...

GAS UP EARLY. We tend to do this a day or two before everyone else and at odd hours of the morning (3-4 am) to avoid lines or shortages.

Fill the caulked tub as a reserve to flush toilets, etc. You might want to consider one of those rubber seals that go over the drain as an extra barrier...

BUG STUFF.

We have a small Coleman camping stove that has had more use outside our front door after the storm passed than it has in the mountains.

I won't take anything for granted. I mopved down here for a job no abolutely no one except for my co workers. I have been through preparing for blizzards which is not really the same thing and have been through hurricane preparations in the Bahamas so I have a good idea what to expect but being new in the area I am always open for suggestions from people who have lived through it. Not sure where I would evacuate if I had to go but I will figure something out.

thanks for the suggestions.
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Old 04-20-2007, 04:58 AM
 
22 posts, read 68,850 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks for all the information. It is way more than I expected. Since I moved here alone, I am a bit concerned about the "prediction" but being prepared helps.

I am going to save this and hopefully never need it again.
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Old 04-20-2007, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,562,470 times
Reputation: 4934
Frankly I get VERY EXCITED everytime I think of a major hurricane comming this way. Strange , yes but true.
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