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Old 04-29-2007, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,498,701 times
Reputation: 4927

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna-50 View Post
Hope it is a nice quiet season. I think it would hurt more than help, more people will be leaving and others won't be moving down. Tourists won't visit. There will probably be no insurance in FL and that would be a bad thing.
Other than losing our tourists the rest of the things listed here seem positive to me. May starts next week, depending on the weather, I will make my prediction. I have been right on every year since hurricane Andrew. Dry May expect a busy season, thunderstorms in May, hurricanes will go away.
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Old 04-30-2007, 05:16 AM
 
60 posts, read 92,907 times
Reputation: 18
I don't know if it will matter whether we get hit with a major hurricane or not. The Treasure Coast had it's strongest years in 2004 and 2005 after the back-to-back hurricanes. People were snapping them up, as-is condition, at full price. I think if we get hit with a hurricane this year then it's just another reason for the Florida bashers to flap their gums.

I haven't been in Florida long enough to make any predictions but it seems that in 2005, the year of Wilma, the spring months were especially rainy and stormy. Maybe this dryness has a silver lining as far as hurricanes go.
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Old 04-30-2007, 05:33 AM
 
Location: US
3,090 posts, read 3,587,321 times
Reputation: 1646
1926? You must not have lived in Florida during Andrew. I personally think a Cat 5 hurricane hitting Miami directly head on is a hurricane with guts. 2004 was no picnic to live through either. I realize the people are collateral damage to many dreaming of a Cat 5 hurricane hitting Florida possibly resulting in their own personal business booming--particularly if you're a builder or in the builder trades--but personally, I would prefer to spare the lives and the property. You can't know what it's really like until you've experienced it. I know the hurricane parties and speculation are fun, but until you've stood over body bags, you just don't get it.

I'm glad at least to see you don't want people losing their homes--although you don't mention the lives--but exactly what do you think would happen if a major hurricane hit Florida.

Florida has been here a very long time. Hurricanes are a part of living here. I don't think we need a killer hurricane for Florida to "survive." Florida is not going to return to the way of life in the 70's or even 80's, no matter what below the Heavens hits it, and people just need to understand and accept that. Many people are moving because of it.

You've posted a lot of good information on these boards--what's up with the death wishes?
-------
". . .Since a major city in Florida has not been hit directly by a hurricane with guts since 1926, nobody realizes how expensive it will be. A direct hit on Miami or Ft lauderdale or Palm Beach would cost to much to rebuild that it would take a decade to happen, if ever. If I had my way the storm would hit Miami directly, then go up to Lake Okeechobee and sit there, bursting the levees. 1926 all over again. A huge panic would drive away the international investors who have ruined Miami. Insurance companies would all stop writing policies and real estate investment would fall flat. Properties that survive would become like gold, at least for a while. When the jobs dry up. tax revenue drops, leaving governments to cut back, and the loss of government jobs cut deep into the "economy" of south Florida. When the big one finally comes, Florida will be set back 10 years. Nothing can help fix the mess we are in faster than a Category 5. Unfortunately we are not going to get one this year, it seems.

Don't think I want to see people lose their homes, but the big picture is that without a major hurricane, we are going to lose our beautiful Florida, permanently. Only a hurricane or tsunami can give us a break from the relentless development, and the slavery of high property values. . . ."
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Old 04-30-2007, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,498,701 times
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Andrew hit the poorest sections of Dade county. Miami and the beaches were largely untouched. If the 1926 hurricane blew away the idiot investors and flippers, why would another hurricane not do the same? Remember, south Florida has no real industry, it's all depending on image. Blowing away thousands , maybe millions of buildings put up without regard to the climate will discourage future stupidity. You can't educate people how to do things the right way but nature will do the job, wonderfully. Remember, there's NOTHING any humans can do to stop it.
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Old 04-30-2007, 10:34 AM
 
Location: US
3,090 posts, read 3,587,321 times
Reputation: 1646
I think we're going to have to agree to disagree. Any loss of life or property, whether poor or rich, is a problem to me. And devastation and loss of valuable property and life is not necessarily indicative that stupidity/greed/corruption will be thwarted. If you live in Florida, hurricanes and/or their threats are a fact of life. Wishing for them for financial gain is just wrong.

Take care, Tallrick. I'm sure we'll talk about this again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Andrew hit the poorest sections of Dade county. Miami and the beaches were largely untouched. If the 1926 hurricane blew away the idiot investors and flippers, why would another hurricane not do the same? Remember, south Florida has no real industry, it's all depending on image. Blowing away thousands , maybe millions of buildings put up without regard to the climate will discourage future stupidity. You can't educate people how to do things the right way but nature will do the job, wonderfully. Remember, there's NOTHING any humans can do to stop it.
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Old 04-30-2007, 12:19 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,571 posts, read 48,989,723 times
Reputation: 13457
Hurricane Charley was a strong category 4, and it did not hit a poor area. Prices jacked up right afterwards and people snapped up damaged homes like hotcakes.

To wish for a category 5 to hit is ridiculous, not to mention morally objectionable.

Predictions are just that, they don't mean a thing.

My best wishes to Florida during hurricane season. May you have a repeat of last year!
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Old 05-02-2007, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,689,223 times
Reputation: 2995
Lightbulb $40 million going to hurricane improvement group

Every bit helps...

Lawmakers are poised to give $40'million for processing hurricane home improvements to a Florida nonprofit headed by woman whose husband works for the House council that recommended the appropriation.

Volunteer Florida Foundation already has a $20 million grant from the state Department of Financial Services to process a grant program that inspects homes for low-income residents, many of whom are elderly or disabled. The foundation then contracts with other nonprofit organizations to harden the homes against hurricanes.

The original $20 million contract is part of the $250 million mitigation program, My Safe Florida Home, approved by lawmakers last year.

Tracking Map:

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Old 05-02-2007, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,689,223 times
Reputation: 2995
Lightbulb Florida's most horrific storms

Hurricane of 1928
Florida's deadliest hurricane, and the third deadliest natural disaster in U.S. history:
• Sept. 16, 1928
• Category 4

It was officially unnamed when it hit, but now it is legend: The Great Hurricane of 1928 killed at least 2,000 when the waters of Lake Okeechobee spilled out and flooded lake towns.

The storm changed the way Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades were managed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a 150-mile **** around the lake to protect people from future hurricanes, though none, yet, has been anywhere near as powerful as the 1928 hurricane.
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Old 05-02-2007, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,689,223 times
Reputation: 2995
Default A hurricane's power

The Saffir-Simpson scale ranks hurricanes from Category 1 to Category 5, the most powerful. Andrew came ashore in Florida in August 1992 as a Category 5 hurricane. In 2005, Wilma was a Category 5 in the Caribbean and a category 2 in South Florida. Katrina was a 1 in Broward and Miami-Dade counties and a 3 when it hit the Gulf Coast. Besides Andrew, only two other Category 5 storms have hit the United States since record-keeping began: the 1935 Labor Day hurricane in the Florida Keys and Hurricane Camille along the Mississippi coast in 1969. The five classes of hurricanes explained:

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