U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Thread summary:

How people with special needs prepare for hurricane season, emergency transport office, consult with doctors, physicians, support groups, police officers, nursing homes

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-15-2007, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,732,721 times
Reputation: 2996

Advertisements

Plan for people with special needs: Everyone can post information related to hurricane preparation tips. The more informed we post the easier to deal with a situation....



A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity.

Hurricane plans for people with special needs should be made well in advance.

Call ahead of time

In some areas, you can call your local Emergency Management Office to register a person with special needs. Call well before a disaster because officials may need to screen requests to determine the level of care needed.

The Emergency Management Office may be able to provide assistance that includes direct warning of an evacuation, help in leaving a home, transportation to a home or shelter, or transportation of equipment such as wheelchairs.

After registering with an Emergency Management Office, keep the registration form and instructions safe and handy.

Arrange transportation

Unless you're told specifically that transportation will be provided, arrange for your own. Even if you arrange transportation with emergency workers, plan for backup transportation just in case, and for peace of mind.

Pack a "safety bag"

Prepare a "safety" bag to take with you should you have to evacuate. It should include a blanket, pillow, folding chair, and sleeping bag or cot; food for at least two days; medication for three to seven days; personal hygiene items; identification and valuable documents (insurance, birth and marriage certificates, and special-needs forms); battery-operated radio; flashlight; batteries; and change of clothes.

Ask for help

Consult with physicians, health care providers, support groups and service agencies regarding your needs and how to meet them in the event of a hurricane.

If you are medically dependent upon electricity, contact vendors or your physician for back-up power sources.

Don't panic if you can't get a ride when a hurricane is threatening. Ask a police officer or emergency official for help.

Nursing homes

Most states require nursing homes to have disaster plans. The plans require adequate food and water, medical supplies, emergency power and staffing. If you have someone in a nursing home, ask the supervisor to see the plans well before a storm threatens.
Read 1 comment »
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-17-2007, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,732,721 times
Reputation: 2996
Lightbulb Talk to kids, but don't scare them

Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them.

Explain hurricanes

Explain to your children that a hurricane is a giant, rainy windstorm, destructive and dangerous, but survivable with preparation and precaution.

The more children know about the storm and safety procedures, the more confident they will be. But keep it simple; detailed information is useless if children can't digest it.

Younger children may have trouble understanding the idea of a hurricane. Talk to them instead about its effects. They need to know that a hurricane can destroy homes and leave families without food, water, and electricity.

Using a map, help older children name the states and cities where hurricanes are likely to strike. Have them mark where you live in the hurricane zone.

Ask children, whatever their age, to make a list of what they do during a typical day. Explain to them that those activities might change if a hurricane hits: School might close; they may not get to play outside; they may have to eat different foods.

Involve children in preparations

It's important for children to feel they are a part of the preparations. Allow children to help plan and pack safety kits, help check hurricane shutters, make preparations for their pets.

Children should be reminded of their hurricane lessons throughout the year; a crash course in hurricanes only hours before one arrives may cause children to panic.

What to pack

A child's supply kit should be equipped with the same items included for an overnight stay at grandma's. Here's a checklist:

# Games

# Toys

# Blanket

# Stuffed animal

# Favorite books

# Favorite food

# Toothbrush

# Toothpaste

Rain gear

# Paper, pencils

# Coloring books

# Flashlight

Be calm as a storm approaches

As a storm approaches, children's fears can intensify. Grown-ups can help calm those fears with a common-sense, parent-to-kid talk.

You should start talking with your children about the coming storm, and what you're going to do about it, 24 to 36 hours before it arrives.

But, before you say anything, make sure you are not so stressed you will frighten them. Be sure to answer questions calmly, and remember that younger kids need less detailed explanations than older kids.

Here are some other tips:

Make sure children understand how important it is for them to listen to adults during the storm.

Parents should explain again that a hurricane is a giant windstorm, destructive and dangerous, but survivable with the preparations you've all made.

The more children know about the storm and safety procedures, the more confident they will be during the storm and recovery.

At this stage, when the storm is threatening, it's more important than ever for children to feel they are a part of the preparations.

Let them help gather and pack safety kits, which should include their toys and games for quiet play in small areas.

At the grocery, when you're getting last-minute supplies, allow children to pick out some of their favorite foods.

Ask your children to close their eyes and imagine pouring rain and the sounds of whipping wind. Tell them the wind might knock down trees and houses and overturn cars. Then tell them to imagine how dark it is when they sleep at night -- and tell them that if winds knock out power, that is what it will be like.

Tell children the storm might be so strong that you will all have to leave home. You might have to go to a relative's home, a hotel or a shelter.

If you're going to evacuate the area, let children bring a favorite game or toy. Make sure it's relatively quiet and doesn't take up much space.

Wherever you stay, children should be firmly warned to stay away from windows and doors.

Explain that the storm might grow quiet during the passing of the hurricane's eye, but that the rain and roar will begin again after the eye has passed.

During the storm, children can listen to parents tell stories from their own lives or the lives of grandparents. Stories that call for participation, by clapping or repeating lines on cue, are best for relieving stress, especially for young children.

Encourage children to tell their own stories, but don't force them. Sing songs, too; singing helps relieve stress.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 03:27 PM
 
1,080 posts, read 4,273,719 times
Reputation: 606
Default Pets

And please don't forget about your pets!!!! They will not be allowed at shelters. Make arrangements ahead of time with kennels/vet's offices.
Pack several days food for them/take pictures of the animal with yourself in case of getting lost (worst case senerio)/ have current vacination papers available.

I'm sure there is something else I forgot to mention.........
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,732,721 times
Reputation: 2996
Lightbulb Hurricane Conference Focus On Generators; Aging Satellite

Two key resources gas stations with generators and Satellites

Emergency managers from across the state are in south Florida at the Annual Governor's Hurricane Conference in Ft. Lauderdale.

The conference wraps up Friday, less than two weeks before the start of the 2007 hurricane season.

Wednesday was a big day at the conference, with speeches from new governor Charlie Crist, the new head of the National Hurricane Center and the director of FEMA.

Crist says the state will be ready and that includes taking gas stations to court to force them to buy generators.

Only half of the 254 gas stations along evacuation routes have generators as required by law and this week the stations not complying got letters warning them of legal action.

Crist also says that any eventual property-tax relief would not compromise state or county efforts to help Floridians prepare for and respond to hurricanes or other disasters.
Aging Satellite Could Threaten Hurricane Predictions

The new head of the National Hurricane Center in Miami is raising concerns over a potential problem with hurricane forecasts.

Director Bill Proenza said that a vital satellite for determining a hurricane's power is well over its life span and might soon leave forecasters without information about storm strength.

The earliest launch for a replacement satellite is in 2012.

Proenza said the federal government is to blame by wasting money. He said that top officials at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are spending $4 million on a 200-year anniversary celebration.

Meanwhile, Proenza said, NOAA has cut $700,000 from a crucial hurricane research program and allowed other important initiatives to go unfunded.

NOAA officials in Washington rejected the criticisms. They said the anniversary campaign is only costing $1.5 million and that it helps explain their mission to the public.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 10:00 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,971 posts, read 33,868,857 times
Reputation: 8868
What about Service Dogs are they allowed in shelters??
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 24,560,418 times
Reputation: 4934
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunrico90 View Post
Two key resources gas stations with generators and Satellites

Emergency managers from across the state are in south Florida at the Annual Governor's Hurricane Conference in Ft. Lauderdale.

The conference wraps up Friday, less than two weeks before the start of the 2007 hurricane season.

Wednesday was a big day at the conference, with speeches from new governor Charlie Crist, the new head of the National Hurricane Center and the director of FEMA.

Crist says the state will be ready and that includes taking gas stations to court to force them to buy generators.

Only half of the 254 gas stations along evacuation routes have generators as required by law and this week the stations not complying got letters warning them of legal action.

Crist also says that any eventual property-tax relief would not compromise state or county efforts to help Floridians prepare for and respond to hurricanes or other disasters.
Aging Satellite Could Threaten Hurricane Predictions

The new head of the National Hurricane Center in Miami is raising concerns over a potential problem with hurricane forecasts.

Director Bill Proenza said that a vital satellite for determining a hurricane's power is well over its life span and might soon leave forecasters without information about storm strength.

The earliest launch for a replacement satellite is in 2012.

Proenza said the federal government is to blame by wasting money. He said that top officials at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are spending $4 million on a 200-year anniversary celebration.

Meanwhile, Proenza said, NOAA has cut $700,000 from a crucial hurricane research program and allowed other important initiatives to go unfunded.

NOAA officials in Washington rejected the criticisms. They said the anniversary campaign is only costing $1.5 million and that it helps explain their mission to the public.
Nothing like Government at work! In a way I hope that the satellite conchs out to show how our tax money is being mismanaged. No wonder I get so angry so often, this is a SERIOUS business and they are going to have a party?? I mean have the hurricane party AFTER the season, and make it a "covered dish" party, that's how I do it! It's great when you know the food isn't going to waste.

By the way instead of requiring generators at gas stations how about bringing back the old glass top gas pumps!

http://www.thegaspumpstore.com/gp1122.jpg (broken link)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Debary, Florida
2,267 posts, read 2,729,253 times
Reputation: 685
I have tarps, bungie cords, gas cans for extra gas...a window unit to cool just one room with the generator I have, I have batteries and flashlights, a hand held TV that runs on batteries and PLENTY of candles...

Another thing some people don't think about, I have a charger for my cell phone that goes in my car...I was surprised at the number of people who told me they didn't have one and had no way to charge their phone while the power was out.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2007, 11:10 PM
 
3 posts, read 6,752 times
Reputation: 10
Are hurricanes very destructive in Jacksonville? I thought they weren't a big threat in this city?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2007, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,732,721 times
Reputation: 2996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
What about Service Dogs are they allowed in shelters??
Yes, they are allowed...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2007, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Living in Paradise
5,702 posts, read 22,732,721 times
Reputation: 2996
Thumbs up Protect your pets and animals

To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel.

Don't plan on taking your pet to a public shelter. Because of safety and public health concerns, few public shelters allow pets, except assistance dogs.

Leave pets alone at home only as a last resort, and then be sure to leave them enough food and water. Never leave a pet at home on a tether.

At home

Be sure the pet has proper identification. Tags increase the chance of an owner-pet reunion after a storm.

Arrange to make the pet as comfortable as possible; give it a familiar place to stay and leave a familiar towel.

Have on hand a two-week supply of food, water and any medications.

Boarding

If you're going to board your pet, now is the time to call your veterinary clinic or the Humane Society for kennel locations.

Broward County: Call the Humane Society of Broward County at 954-989-3977 or its Hurricane Hotline at 954-266-6871. A list of boarding kennels and pet-friendly hotels in Broward is available online at humanebroward.com or broward.org/animal.

Palm Beach County: Call the Peggy Adams Animal Rescue League of the Palm Beaches at 561-686-3663. The league shelters cats and dogs from evacuated areas only.

Miami-Dade County: Call the Humane Society of Greater Miami at 305-696-0800.

Local kennels: Call now and ask about emergency procedures and admission requirements.

Traveling

Consider buying a portable carrier or cage if you're going to be traveling with a pet.

Bring along a collar with identification, a familiar towel or blanket, a two-week supply of water and food, a leash and any medications needed.

Consider leaving exotic pets, such as parrots, reptiles or ferrets, with friends or relatives outside of storm-threatened areas. Exotic pets usually require specialized care and feeding, and are more sensitive to environmental changes than dogs or cats.

Shelters

A few shelters will allow pets, but you should register in advance.

Broward County: The pet-friendly shelter is at Millennium Middle School, at 5803 NW 94th Ave. in Tamarac. This shelter is intended to serve as a last resort only, and residents hoping to make use of the shelter must preregister in person at the Humane Society, 2070 Griffin Road, Fort Lauderdale. Registration opens May 31, and pet owners should bring proof, such as a utility bill, that they live in an evacuation zone, as well as proof of rabies vaccination; the name, address and phone number of the pet's veterinarian; and a photo of the pet.

Palm Beach County: There is a pet-friendly shelter at the gymnasium of the West Boynton Recreation Center, 6000 Northtree Blvd. in Lake Worth, for county residents in evacuation zones or mobile homes.

Visit pbcgov.com/pubsafety/animal for more information.

Miami-Dade County: The shelter will be on the county fairgrounds in Sunshine Pavilion, Sunshine Pavilion on the grounds of the Miami-Dade County Fair & Exposition, 10900 SW 24th St. Call 786-331-5354.

Livestock

Some animal control officials say cows and horses are better off in a pasture. Others recommend sheltering them in a stable, barn or shed. You should decide now which avenue you will take.

SOURCES: AMERICAN RED CROSS, HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE U.S., FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND THE BROWARD COUNTY AND MIAMI-DADE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCIES.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:33 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top