U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-19-2007, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Debary, Florida
2,267 posts, read 2,693,161 times
Reputation: 685

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by macguy View Post
Counter clockwise, clockwise if you are in Shark bay Australia.
http://www.usd.edu/esci/exams/winds.html (broken link)

According to this site and others, in the Northern hemisphere (where Florida is), they spin clockwise and in the Southern hemisphere they spin counter clockwise.

I spent alot of time watching since I have moved here AND we had one just the other day here off the East coast of Florida, it was spinning clockwise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2007, 06:20 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,799,698 times
Reputation: 13442
According to the National Weather Service:


The earth's rotation sets up an apparent force (called the Coriolis force) that pulls the winds to the right in the Northern Hemisphere (and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere). When a low pressure system starts to form north of the equator, the surface winds will flow inward trying to fill in the low and will be deflected to the right and a counter-clockwise rotation will be initiated. The opposite (a deflection to the left and a clockwise rotation) will occur south of the equator.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,415,118 times
Reputation: 8849

[RIGHT]Statistics on damage from Wilma and lake Okeechobee


https://my.sfwmd.gov/portal/page?_pageid=2814,19613308,2814_19613566&_dad=port al&_schema=PORTAL (broken link)https://my.sfwmd.gov/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/PG_GRP_SFWMD_KOE/PORTLET_AFTERHURRICANEWILMA/TAB2356049/358_MVC_003S_DEBRIS_INTRO.JPG (broken link)[/RIGHT]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
1,406 posts, read 4,763,248 times
Reputation: 854
According to the National Hurricane Center:

Hurricanes rotate in a counterclockwise direction around an "eye." A tropical storm becomes a hurricane when winds reach 74 mph. There are on average six Atlantic hurricanes each year; over a three-year period, approximately five hurricanes strike the United States coastline from Texas to Maine. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1 and ends November 30. The East Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15 through November 30, with peak activity occurring during July through September.

http://hurricanes.noaa.gov/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
1,406 posts, read 4,763,248 times
Reputation: 854
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa_from_Debary View Post
From Francis we learned that the WALLS of our houses would allow water to come through them...Francis blew rain sideways through the walls, they realized (DUH) that maybe they should seal the walls. This of course went on all day...I had water blow in vents in my roof...I had water blow in through my glass block window over my garden tub.
Lisa: I have never heard what type walls had water go through them. Were they concrete block w/stucco or stucco over frame? I would guess that the water that came thru your window was because of the mortar being unsealed (?). Fortunately, we only lost shingles, but we also missed the brunt of the storm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 08:06 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,799,698 times
Reputation: 13442
Hurricanes are very unpredictable. I've seen them do a loop-dee-loop and come back.

In Fort Myers, the big selling point was that a hurricane hadn't hit there since Donna in 1960 or 1961.

First year I was there, Hurricane Georges came on by and I was terrified. Well, it went on by.

Hurricane Charley was predicted to do the same thing. About two hours beforehand, it jogged to the right and the rest is history.

Asking for stats about hurricanes is like pissing in the wind. Literally.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=FXk_WYVL5sk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 08:10 PM
 
155 posts, read 446,703 times
Reputation: 28
Hurricanes that hit Florida spin counter clockwise. The difference between and east coast landfall and a west coast landfall is that when a hurricane hits the east coast, it comes from the east and the counter clockwise rotation piles the water up on the north side. On the west coast, hurricanes have to make a hook toward the east in order to make landfall, this impact from the opposite direction causes the water to build up on the south side of the storm. Also, Charley had no storm surge here in SW FL. It all depends on wind speed, speed the storm is moving, location, and sometimes its just left to random circumstance. Every storm is unique almost as if they had their own personality.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2007, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,415,118 times
Reputation: 8849
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Hurricanes are very unpredictable. I've seen them do a loop-dee-loop and come back.

In Fort Myers, the big selling point was that a hurricane hadn't hit there since Donna in 1960 or 1961.

First year I was there, Hurricane Georges came on by and I was terrified. Well, it went on by.

Hurricane Charley was predicted to do the same thing. About two hours beforehand, it jogged to the right and the rest is history.

Asking for stats about hurricanes is like pissing in the wind. Literally.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=FXk_WYVL5sk

You are right- In September 2004 (when we had 3 consecutive- ) we had the news on all week until power was lost for 2 weeks and we had no water. They kept reporting it was not headed toward West Palm, then an hour before that it headed toward Port Saint Lucie. Watching the news is a waste of time because there are so many factors of nature it cannot be predicted. A neighbor of mine from Silicon Valley likened it to earthquake prediction- they know its coming- just not how bad----
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2007, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Missouri
109 posts, read 365,701 times
Reputation: 24
Default Thank You

I think the consensus is counter-clockwise rotation,.....which makes sense.

Thanks to all who have added a thread with information and links. I have some quality reading ahead of me I'm sure that my generate some more questions.

This is good stuff!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2007, 07:08 AM
 
262 posts, read 865,595 times
Reputation: 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa_from_Debary View Post
http://www.usd.edu/esci/exams/winds.html (broken link)

According to this site and others, in the Northern hemisphere (where Florida is), they spin clockwise and in the Southern hemisphere they spin counter clockwise.

I spent alot of time watching since I have moved here AND we had one just the other day here off the East coast of Florida, it was spinning clockwise.

In our hemisphere, all hurricanes spin counter-clockwise. They are cyclonic storms, and cyclonic=counter-clockwise. In the South Atlantic, a storm would spin clockwise. Tornados spin counter-clockwise as well. (There are accounts of tornados that had a clockwise rotation - but it's very rare.)

Regarding storm surge - this is a problem on the east coast as well as the gulf. However, there are a couple of areas off the east coast that may lessen it - a bit. This was the case with Andrew. Although the storm had a surge, the height of the surge would have been even worse had a similar storm struck the gulf coast. The shelf off of the coast there causes surge to pile up higher.

But if you live on the water, you must be prepared for storm surge.

Being inland doesn't always guarantee safety from tropical systems. Charlie made a mess in central FL - there were blue tarps on roofs even there. Look at Floyd in inland NC - was much worse than Floyd's damage in FL. It was horrific.

A lot depends on the hurricane - its track, speed, and also how much rain it's dumping. A rainy system that stalls can cause awful flooding (Allison in TX). Flooding is usually the worst problem (but with Andrew, the FL damage was all wind).

The best way to understand hurricanes is to read about them. There are excellent preparation tips on this board (Sunrico has a great post on this). And there are plenty of books - two excellent ones are: Florida's Hurricane History by Jay Barnes, and Encyclopedia of Hurricanes, Typhoons and Cyclones by David Longshore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather > Hurricanes
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top