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Old 05-20-2007, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Missouri
109 posts, read 365,853 times
Reputation: 24

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This may be a stupid question but if your cinder block home gets flooded is there any damage to the blocks? Will the reinforcing re-bar rust out or the cement soften?

Are poured concrete floors the only way to go?
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Old 05-20-2007, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Port St. Lucie and Okeechobee, FL
1,305 posts, read 5,133,531 times
Reputation: 1083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondax View Post
1) How far inland does a hurricane heading onto land from the eastern seaboard need to travel for it to diminish in strength? For instance does a CAT4 turn into a CAT3 10 miles over land, 20, 50 etc?
As most of the others have said, it varies with the storm. One example not previously mentioned was Wilma in 2005, which was stronger when it exited from Palm Beach, Martin and St. Lucie counties than it was when it entered on the Gulf coast -- it actually gained strength as it crossed the state.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondax View Post
2) Do east coast Floridians need to worry about storm surge like they do on the west and continental coasts? I've just not heard of surge water entering miles inland flooding Miami, Palm Beach or the like.
Consider that most storms that hit the East coast are traveling parallel to the coast, not slamming into it. The exceptions, of course, are in the Keys and south of Miami, like Homestead. There are also exceptions where a storm has looped and come back to hit Florida from the NE rather than the SE. But, for the most part, the natural direction of storms is to go North (see how many go up the center of the Atlantic rather than hit the coast), the Gulf Stream tends to push the storms North, and the Bahama Islands tend to break up direct slams into Palm Beach, Martin or St. Lucie counties.

That same natural tendency of storms to turn towards the NE tends to push them right at the Gulf coast after they make it through the straits of Florida into the Gulf, or to curve them towards the Alabama-Mississippi-Louisiana coast.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondax View Post
3) If the Okeechobee levies break would flood waters reach PBC or anywhere along the coast?
The entire south shore of the Lake is in Palm Beach County, so even a leak the size of a garden hose would "reach" PBC. The natural storm surges tend to push the water towards the south side of the lake. That's where the dikes are the weakest as a result, and where the dikes rebuilding is starting to take place. While the lake is shallow, that tends to increase the "tsunami" effect and a large surge of water could go many miles before it started to settle. I doubt it would reach the coast, if it even went that direction -- it would tend to inundate the sugar fields and flow into the Everglades.

One small posted error -- while the 1928 storm did kill over 2000 souls, it was not because the dikes broke -- there were no dikes around the lake until after that disaster. There was absolutely nothing to impede the surge of water from blowing out of the lake and flooding the surrounding area. Most of the dead were poor Black sharecroppers, who were largely undocumented. No one knows exactly who or how many were killed. Those who were recovered were buried in mass graves. None of the surges reached the more "civilized" area of PBC.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hondax View Post
4) Building code information detailing Hurricane construction methods and how much wind they can sustain.
That is far too complex to discuss in this forum. Books have been written and multiple-hour courses are offered for professional contractors just to learn the differences in the latest codes. How much wind they can sustain is part of the code. Uplift is much more important that down force (we have no snow loads with which to contend), and walls, trusses and fastenings are engineered to meet the loads. Here's a chart to show the various loads, according to location:

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Old 05-20-2007, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Debary, Florida
2,267 posts, read 2,697,582 times
Reputation: 685
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040903.html

Here is a picture of Hurricane Francis 2004, judge for yourself which was its spinning...
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Old 05-20-2007, 06:36 PM
 
2,313 posts, read 2,558,148 times
Reputation: 471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa_from_Debary View Post
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap040903.html

Here is a picture of Hurricane Francis 2004, judge for yourself which was its spinning...
The bands are very clear like a saw blade spinning counter clockwise. Regardless it is common knowledge, it's not exactly debatable.
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Old 05-20-2007, 07:02 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,843,467 times
Reputation: 13442
This will probably help everybody out.

Go to the link and scroll down until you see the moving image of Charley.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Charley
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Old 05-20-2007, 07:09 PM
 
2,141 posts, read 6,459,851 times
Reputation: 589
Spinning counter clockwise
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Old 05-20-2007, 07:16 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,843,467 times
Reputation: 13442
Quote:
Originally Posted by firemed View Post
Spinning counter clockwise
Right.
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Old 05-20-2007, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Vero Beach
250 posts, read 1,394,565 times
Reputation: 144
These are a couple of sites I used last year:

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp

http://www.stormnet.cc/

http://www.hurricaneadvisories.com/


http://www.wftv.com/hurricanetracker/index.html
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Old 05-20-2007, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,495 posts, read 24,434,406 times
Reputation: 8849
I still am amazed that people are trying to predict hurricanes , and then move to Florida....
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Old 05-20-2007, 09:15 PM
 
1,343 posts, read 4,779,516 times
Reputation: 853
You all are gonna move down here anyway, so why bother to ask?
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