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Old 08-23-2019, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
25,713 posts, read 17,150,388 times
Reputation: 19638

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nowhereman427 View Post
Thanks for that info
Looks like from Boise to the Panhandle might be better.
No. It's worse. At least by the map that was linked by a poster.

The map was broken into more likely, average, and least likely for radon presence. There is no least-likely place in Idaho- it's all more or average.
Most of southern Idaho is average by the map, including Bannock county, the home of Pocatello.

As I say- radon can be present anywhere. If it scares you, then it's worth the money to have any place tested. It would also pay to inquire if a prospective home has been tested as well; the realtors won't usually volunteer that information, but would have to respond to a direct inquiry about a test.

I mentioned the cheap at-home tests, but there are professionals who can come and test and deliver the results much quicker and more accurately.

I never bothered with any of it when I purchased my present home, but only because I was so familiar with the house before I bought it. I'm the 4th owner, and I personally knew the other 3. Two of them were in real estate, so if there had been radon here, I'm sure I would have been informed.

But radon can creep. So this thread has got me thinking about buying a home test, as I've now lived here for 15 years. It's cheap medical insurance, I think, especially when the remedy is so easy and cheap.
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Old 08-23-2019, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Around and about
3,029 posts, read 1,334,231 times
Reputation: 5213
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
No. It's worse. At least by the map that was linked by a poster.

The map was broken into more likely, average, and least likely for radon presence. There is no least-likely place in Idaho- it's all more or average.
Most of southern Idaho is average by the map, including Bannock county, the home of Pocatello.

As I say- radon can be present anywhere. If it scares you, then it's worth the money to have any place tested. It would also pay to inquire if a prospective home has been tested as well; the realtors won't usually volunteer that information, but would have to respond to a direct inquiry about a test.

I mentioned the cheap at-home tests, but there are professionals who can come and test and deliver the results much quicker and more accurately.

I never bothered with any of it when I purchased my present home, but only because I was so familiar with the house before I bought it. I'm the 4th owner, and I personally knew the other 3. Two of them were in real estate, so if there had been radon here, I'm sure I would have been informed.

But radon can creep. So this thread has got me thinking about buying a home test, as I've now lived here for 15 years. It's cheap medical insurance, I think, especially when the remedy is so easy and cheap.
But it's much more than only radon. It's the uranium, and other contaminants that were left in the soil by certain processing plants per the articles I posted.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:05 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,013 posts, read 2,106,934 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
No. It's worse. At least by the map that was linked by a poster.

The map was broken into more likely, average, and least likely for radon presence. There is no least-likely place in Idaho- it's all more or average.
Most of southern Idaho is average by the map, including Bannock county, the home of Pocatello.

As I say- radon can be present anywhere. If it scares you, then it's worth the money to have any place tested. It would also pay to inquire if a prospective home has been tested as well; the realtors won't usually volunteer that information, but would have to respond to a direct inquiry about a test.

I mentioned the cheap at-home tests, but there are professionals who can come and test and deliver the results much quicker and more accurately.

I never bothered with any of it when I purchased my present home, but only because I was so familiar with the house before I bought it. I'm the 4th owner, and I personally knew the other 3. Two of them were in real estate, so if there had been radon here, I'm sure I would have been informed.

But radon can creep. So this thread has got me thinking about buying a home test, as I've now lived here for 15 years. It's cheap medical insurance, I think, especially when the remedy is so easy and cheap.
Thanks for that info

As previously mentioned, going by that map California has a higher radon rating than Idaho if that map is accurate.
But we will keep an open mind in the places we look at like Rigby, Rexburg and perhaps Boise but maybe 20 to 30 miles away from Boise.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:06 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,013 posts, read 2,106,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
But it's much more than only radon. It's the uranium, and other contaminants that were left in the soil by certain processing plants per the articles I posted.
I wouldn't think that they would build houses on top of all of that at this time unless it was or will be cleaned up if that is possible.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Around and about
3,029 posts, read 1,334,231 times
Reputation: 5213
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowhereman427 View Post
I wouldn't think that they would build houses on top of all of that at this time unless it was or will be cleaned up if that is possible.
i sure hope not. But I lost interest rather quickly after reading about it. Back in the 70's I used to work with a couple types of radiation at a submarine shipyard in Connecticut. That was enough radiation for me of any kind, lol. Good luck finding a nice place.
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Old 08-24-2019, 12:37 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,013 posts, read 2,106,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
i sure hope not. But I lost interest rather quickly after reading about it. Back in the 70's I used to work with a couple types of radiation at a submarine shipyard in Connecticut. That was enough radiation for me of any kind, lol. Good luck finding a nice place.
good for you get outta there.
THANKS!
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Old 08-26-2019, 09:54 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,013 posts, read 2,106,934 times
Reputation: 1080

https://www.eastidahonews.com/2019/0...idaho-reactor/
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:31 AM
 
Location: Around and about
3,029 posts, read 1,334,231 times
Reputation: 5213
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowhereman427 View Post
Thanks for the link. I just started reading it now. It looks interesting.
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Old 08-27-2019, 02:19 AM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
7,632 posts, read 5,328,855 times
Reputation: 6399
Good grief. This is a common phenomenon throughout most of the US. I personally don't worry about it having lived in Pocatello, Idaho Falls, and currently in Tri-Cities, WA. The chances you will be harmed by this are extremely slim. In fact, just walking outside your house, getting in your car, and driving to work would provide about 1,000 times greater risk.
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Old 08-27-2019, 08:51 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
3,013 posts, read 2,106,934 times
Reputation: 1080
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Good grief. This is a common phenomenon throughout most of the US. I personally don't worry about it having lived in Pocatello, Idaho Falls, and currently in Tri-Cities, WA. The chances you will be harmed by this are extremely slim. In fact, just walking outside your house, getting in your car, and driving to work would provide about 1,000 times greater risk.
Just doing that here (driving)your chances are even higher and worse of getting killed and or injured.
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