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Old 08-21-2020, 03:15 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,797 times
Reputation: 10

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My family and I are from out of state and I recently got a job in Idaho Falls. For now it is remote, but we will be moving in a few months to be closer to the office. We found some land in Rigby near Ririe and are about to start construction on a home. I was wondering if anyone would be so kind as to answer the questions below:

I tried to look up utility information and found the City of Rigby website and it shows a monthly charge of $120 for water, sewer and garbage.

So my first question is, if the house has a well for water and septic for waste, do I still pay for water and waste services?

If not, how do I locate a garbage company and approx what is the monthly cost?

Is there a preferred internet service out in that area? I need at least 50mbps and the faster the better.

I noticed a several houses in the area with large white tanks on their properties, I would assume that is propane, is that correct? Is there a benefit to propane in the area?

Last question, what are the favorite food spots in Rigby and the surrounding areas.
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Old 08-21-2020, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Ammon
151 posts, read 127,058 times
Reputation: 131
You will need to be much more specific as to the location to get any useful feedback on available garbage or internet services. While most rural areas have at least one garbage company that services them, Internet is a very different thing. Many areas that are not within city services areas have NO cable provider to get Internet service (or TV) from. If you are beyond the service area for one of the local providers, you may only have dish services available.
Location is everything when asking about what is available and from whom.
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Old 08-21-2020, 04:42 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,797 times
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Ok, I appreciate the information. The following link to Google maps shows the area, we are building in the top left portion just near where 48 curves around by Rudy canal.

https://www.google.com/maps/@43.6417...11.7868747,14z
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Old 08-21-2020, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
27,071 posts, read 18,329,143 times
Reputation: 21146
If your new home isn't inside Rigby city limits, you won't be charged for those services.

With a possible exception; around here, many subdivisions that are outside a local city get hooked up to the city's sewer plant, so it's charged. This is also the case sometimes with water.

It's done for several reasons; one is the sewer trenches. When one is dug, it is used to provide sewer, water, telephone and cable, and natural gas, all using the same trench. This makes the services more economical for the subdivision's residents.

Wells outside city limits may be problematic. Some old wells were dug communally, located on one owner's property but owned by 3-4 others as well, and many of these old wells are still wet but don't produce enough water to meet modern needs.
Other times, for example, a neighbor who has livestock that isn't polluting his own well can pollute other nearby wells with the livestock.

The water table here really varies. So sometimes the first water is not nearly as good as deeper water may be. Water can be found as shallow as 60 feet, but a good, clean well may need to go 500 feet deep. The deeper the well the larger the pump.

While I don't know this for sure, it's probable that your rural garbage service will be one of several private companies. Water is sometimes provided by a private company as well.

High speed internet depends on where the optic cable lines are in the rural parts of the county. In general, the more homes there are along a county road, the better likelihood of an optic cable in the area. When a house is off by itself, it's chancier.

Propane is used very commonly for rural heating here, as running gas lines can be very expensive and/or impossible due to local terrain. The tanks are usually rented as part of the propane service, but not always. Propane is relatively cheap here because we're next door to Wyoming, a major gas producer. It's also the cleanest and most efficient heat.

Septic tanks have to be approved by the county inspectors before they're installed.

Jefferson County and Rigby have been small and mostly rural forever, but both are now growing very fast.
There are lots of very old farms that are being sold for housing development now, so there are lots of old wells and septic tanks and power lines that are still there, even if the farmhouse is long gone.

The sudden growth always causes problems, some of which aren't usually thought of by newcomers.

For instance, weed control and pest control is a very big deal here. An undeveloped property may have undergo professional weed kill before any permits are granted. Other properties may require fencing, and there could be rural HOAs that are in effect.

It's best to contact the inspectors, and/or the city, before you buy any property here I think. I would not leave it up to a contractor, for sure, unless I was looking at a lot in a subdivision that's already populated.
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Old 08-21-2020, 06:07 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,797 times
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Wow! Thank you for all that information. It is a subdivision with 1+ acre lots. There is one house that's been there for almost 20 years. Now there are about 8 houses there or in the process of being built. I believe there are only two lots left to be sold. The well and septic will be brand new and are per lot, not a community well.

Does anyone know what the costs for propane are and if there are any setup fees? Or the name or link to the local propane provider.

Thanks again for all the incredible information.
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Old 08-21-2020, 09:45 PM
 
3,829 posts, read 2,699,062 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by banjomike View Post
If your new home isn't inside Rigby city limits, you won't be charged for those services.

With a possible exception; around here, many subdivisions that are outside a local city get hooked up to the city's sewer plant, so it's charged. This is also the case sometimes with water.

It's done for several reasons; one is the sewer trenches. When one is dug, it is used to provide sewer, water, telephone and cable, and natural gas, all using the same trench. This makes the services more economical for the subdivision's residents.

Wells outside city limits may be problematic. Some old wells were dug communally, located on one owner's property but owned by 3-4 others as well, and many of these old wells are still wet but don't produce enough water to meet modern needs.
Other times, for example, a neighbor who has livestock that isn't polluting his own well can pollute other nearby wells with the livestock.

The water table here really varies. So sometimes the first water is not nearly as good as deeper water may be. Water can be found as shallow as 60 feet, but a good, clean well may need to go 500 feet deep. The deeper the well the larger the pump.

While I don't know this for sure, it's probable that your rural garbage service will be one of several private companies. Water is sometimes provided by a private company as well.

High speed internet depends on where the optic cable lines are in the rural parts of the county. In general, the more homes there are along a county road, the better likelihood of an optic cable in the area. When a house is off by itself, it's chancier.

Propane is used very commonly for rural heating here, as running gas lines can be very expensive and/or impossible due to local terrain. The tanks are usually rented as part of the propane service, but not always. Propane is relatively cheap here because we're next door to Wyoming, a major gas producer. It's also the cleanest and most efficient heat.

Septic tanks have to be approved by the county inspectors before they're installed.

Jefferson County and Rigby have been small and mostly rural forever, but both are now growing very fast.
There are lots of very old farms that are being sold for housing development now, so there are lots of old wells and septic tanks and power lines that are still there, even if the farmhouse is long gone.

The sudden growth always causes problems, some of which aren't usually thought of by newcomers.

For instance, weed control and pest control is a very big deal here. An undeveloped property may have undergo professional weed kill before any permits are granted. Other properties may require fencing, and there could be rural HOAs that are in effect.

It's best to contact the inspectors, and/or the city, before you buy any property here I think. I would not leave it up to a contractor, for sure, unless I was looking at a lot in a subdivision that's already populated.
What kind of pest control must one be concerned about in this Rigby area? HOA's in older 20 year rural homes
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Old 08-22-2020, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
27,071 posts, read 18,329,143 times
Reputation: 21146
Quote:
Originally Posted by nowhereman427 View Post
What kind of pest control must one be concerned about in this Rigby area? HOA's in older 20 year rural homes
Because it's such an important farming area, a lot of the pests are insects. Nematodes, a round worm that lives in soil and eats potato roots, is particularly dreaded as an infestation can ruin a crop and infest all the surrounding fields quickly. An infestation requires several rounds of plowing and insecticide, then a complete rest of the soil for several years afterward to eliminate the nematodes.

Weeds are a more widespread pest that can also severely damage crop quality and yield. Weeds are a particular problem for the grain crops, and Idaho's barley is renowned for being the finest malting barley grown in the Western Hemisphere.
Our hops are also equally renowned. Our mint is the same. All are very important economically to Idaho, and all are very vulnerable to pests. Mint is so vulnerable the ground cannot be walked on after mint is planted

When a spud crop is worth over $1 million bucks, for sure the farmers insisted on pest control, and they got it.
The fines are heavy for a landowner who ignores their weeds, and in a dispute, the county will often come out and plow a piece of ground under and prohibit anything to be planted back on it until all the weeds are completely gone.
...and then charge the landowner the bill.

HOAs have existed forever. Hobby farms out here were some of the first millionaire 'estates', and they tended to flock together. A lot of those country estates are on 10-40 acre parcels, so they don't look like a community, but they are; they're all owned by doctors, lawyers and other big business folks.

The HOAs are one way contractors have of ensuring good sales in their subdivisions. As often as not, a contractor will own the entire subdivision in a corporation, and building it to completion becomes their lifelong work and income source.

Great-Grandfather plowed the sagebrush under, and Grand-Dad and Daddy farmed it, then the kids learned how to build houses and sell the family farm as a subdivision 100 years later.

That's how Jackson Hole went from being ranch land to a town where the billionaires bought out the millionaires.
Rich folks run with other rich folks, so for the ranching families, turning from ranching to home building was about the only way to prosperity that existed for them. The wealthy all want HOAs to protect their vacation investments.

It's been this way here ever since the 1890s. Idaho was one of the first states to become the Titans of Industry's playground.
Legend has it that the Harriman Railroad Ranch, the largest private ranch in the northwest for almost 100 years, was won in a coin toss. The winner got the ranch, and the loser got Catalina Island.
The ranch has 3 lakes, about 9,000 acres, and it's own mountain range. It's about twice as large as Ted Turner's ranch in Montana.
As a working ranch, it employed about 80 cowboys year round, and the headquarters employed a full staff of housekeepers, cooks, butlers and maids.
When the Harrimans were there with guests every year, they ate black-tie dinners in their private dining room, a separate building that was built for the purpose. The children ate in their own separate, smaller dining room in an adjoining building. Both featured walls that were mostly glass to provide guests with the awesome view.

All of them had to be boarded up before the snow began every winter, as they would become half-buried by December.

The Harrimans brought their guests out in special Union Pacific Pullman cars, which deposited them at their magnificent depot in West Yellowstone. Then the guests were transported to the ranch in custom-built White motor coaches.
Back then, it took a truck company to build a vehicle that could handle the roads here. At the time, White was a small company, but their touring bus made them famous as a truck builder, and they became the most popular logging truck in the northwest.

The Whites were such good people movers that the Yellowstone Park Co., the first commercial contractor, bought a fleet of them in a stripped-down version that became tour busses for the park. Those old Whites were still used up to the early1970s. A friend of mine bought 2 of them when the fleet was finally sold at auction.

Even the hands got a great cookhouse of their own. It was a lot more rustic and less formal, of course, but the digs were by far the best a working cowboy could ever get, so the job turnover on the ranch was next to non-existent.

Nowadays, only the size of the property differs. Today's wealthy are pikers in comparison to their older generation. The old guys knew how to spend their money on real luxury and high adventure.
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