U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Idaho > Idaho Falls
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 08-27-2008, 09:14 PM
 
4 posts, read 13,500 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

Depleted uranium from a uranium enrichment plant can be processed into two different materials. The Flourine can be extracted and used for industrial purposes. The remainder can be disposed of safely in an approved site. Areva has been doing this for more than two decades and has processed hundreds of thousands of tons of depleted uranium. More to the point. Stevel Laflin at International Isotopes has a new process for boosting the purity of the Flourine extracted to sell it to computer and electronics manufacturers, drug companies, and other firms that need this kind of product. See my blog post on his work.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-02-2008, 08:48 AM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,939,603 times
Reputation: 6270
Question Hyperion Power Generation Inc - Possibly to Build Plant in Idaho?

Is Areva already attracting large other companies who need to work near an uranium enrichment plant? Locals know the International Isotopes, an INL off-shoot, if looking to expand. Hometown Idaho Falls is one location this expansion may occur.

However, others are looking too.

Hyperion Power Generation Inc, based in Los Alamos, NM is also considering Idaho Falls as the other location for their manufacturing plant. Per Hyperion, they build, "nuclear batteries."

Here is the link to The Idaho Statesman's article about this possibility. Eastern ID news had more to say, but the Post Register is accessible by suspriction only. Los Alamos firm looks at Lea County for plant | Idaho | Idaho Statesman (http://www.idahostatesman.com/531/story/589864.html - broken link) While this is about 3 years down the road, it is time now, would you like to see another nuclear-type manufacturing plants connected with Areva?

Could there be too many nuclear related businesses based on INL and Areva? Is eastern Idaho ready to become the energy corrider with Idaho Falls at the center? What university will step up and provide more general and college classes in Idaho Falls to prepare future workers at companies like International Isotopes, Hyperion or others who may want to be close to Area?

Please post what you think and what you would like to see happen. I'm not sure all realized by landing Areva that other nuclear-related businesses have been investigating Idaho Falls a lot. Think of the jobs, not only at various nuclear-related companies, but all the support and supply businesses that would need to develop or expand to meet the needs of these companies.

What do YOU think? Do you want more nuclear businesses to build facilities west of Idaho Falls to produce more goods, medical treatments, and applications to many other professions, utilizing some part of the nuclear industry? How would additional nuclear businesses change Idaho Falls, or not?

It should be noted in every press release I've read, Ms. Blackwell, VP of Licensing and Public Affairs for Hyperion says they really aren't looking where to build yet. HUH?

Why even mention Idaho Falls, if NM-based Hyperion isn't looking? I hope someone can explain that to me.

Looking forward to your thoughts.......

MSR

I'm looking forward to your thoughts.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-06-2008, 07:37 AM
 
4 posts, read 13,500 times
Reputation: 11
Default re; Areva & Idaho Falls

Like any large manufacturing operation in a global market, Areva will work with its suppliers to locate some of their capabilities adjacent to the main uranium enrichment plant. There is plenty of space on the Areva site some 18 miles west of town.

For an example of how that works, consider that a large personal care products firm in Idaho Falls worked with a supplier of plastic bottles to co-located the production of the bottles next to the plant that makes and packaged the products for sale.

As for Hyperion and other "nuclear firms," until Hyperion gets a license as a result of completing design certification with the NRC, it isn't going to break ground for any manufacturing sites. Further, the firm doesn't have sole discretion to make a decision. It will go where its investors think it can do well, and that may include international sites. It is way too early in the firm's development of their product to be making plant location decisions. While speculation about them is entertaining, it isn't rational.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2008, 06:37 AM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,939,603 times
Reputation: 6270
Question I Can See Both Sides

Quote:
Originally Posted by djysrv View Post

As for Hyperion and other "nuclear firms," until Hyperion gets a license as a result of completing design certification with the NRC, it isn't going to break ground for any manufacturing sites. Further, the firm doesn't have sole discretion to make a decision. It will go where its investors think it can do well, and that may include international sites. It is way too early in the firm's development of their product to be making plant location decisions. While speculation about them is entertaining, it isn't rational.
djysrv,

Interesting post as always. I can see both sides of the story about "speculation."

Is it speculation when dozens of news outlets, if not more nationally, are running the story? When does it become more than just speculation? Would you deny the press has been used by various companies (no specific state, just the concept) to determine interest in the good and/or service that company hopes to produce and where?

I know two people who were hunting for the name of Hyperion. They had seen a business show and wanted to follow the company now so they could become investors.

For the two people I mentioned (no one I'm related too, but one I do work with who is always looking at high tech to invest in), are they "rationale" to want to follow new energy sources of the future as investment opportunities? Certainly it would be speculation before the company was profitable. However, one tells me the story about an aunt who lives in Kissimmee, FL. That aunt owned something like only 100 shares of stock of a "risky busy" at the time. Walt Disney's stock has paid quite a bit over the years for those 100 shares. My colleague believes in investing for the needs and answers of the future.

Secondly, your point exactly that the firm will be directed by its investors...should that information be limited to NM, ID, neither or everywhere in the U.S.?

I do understand your point about certain regs having to be met. That was an assumption I didn't make clear. I thought most people would understand that.

Didn't Areva say one factor they selected Idaho Falls was the support of the community and state, let alone residents (please, do correct me if I'm wrong). If Areva is a model to be followed, is it reasonable or rationale to think other potential businesses will also be interested in the views of local residents, the potential workforce?

One thing is for sure, I have zero connections with the Idaho Falls media. What news reasons would each tv station have had to run this story, in various ways it was presented?

I appreciate your comments. You make me think about some factors differently. However, in this particular situation, since the company is already hitting the cable news business shows, the AP reprinted the article (or various versions of it), I don't see it as much as speculation as perhaps you do. Consequently, maybe we can just agree to disagree while trying to understand a little more of each other's opinion? I hope so, as I think this is a fascinating concept and know I'm not alone watching what happens. Yet, you raise an interest question.

If every investment or business decision made were based strictly on rationale, I think we would be missing some major businesses we all depend on now. However, I could be wrong.

Looking forward to the thoughts of any who care to comment about the companies Areva may draw to the Idaho Falls area and when is it responsible to discuss their entrance into eastern ID?

Thanks,

MSR
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2008, 08:10 AM
 
4 posts, read 13,500 times
Reputation: 11
Default re; what's rational

It is the nature of high technology start ups to "hype" potential locations for new manufacturing plants to generate buzz and attract investors. It creates the "image" that the firm is making progress with the product even if licensing and full production are still years away.

In this regard Hyperion is no better and no worse than a Silicon Valley startup in the computer industry.

Hyperion's "burn rate" relative to current cash on hand, and their ability to attract new investors, will be key issues to bringing a commercial product to market. Technical success is the most relevant issue. The licensing hurdles will be met if the product design is technically complete in all respects and not still emerging from the design process when the license application is submitted to the NRC. Otherwise, additional investor resources will be spent resolving questions from the regulators and this delay will impact time to market. It could also require new investor funding, which could be difficult at this stage if the licensing process bogs down.

It also follows that once design is complete, that's the time to start figuring out how to build the product for multiple customers. It is also the time to worry about the supply chain of components.

It makes no sense to invest significant money at the current early stage in locating a production facility. The time to do that is when it is clear the NRC will issue a license for the reactor design. That license is a "gold standard" because investors will show up, with the "gold," once it is in hand. That new round of investor financing can then be used to locate and build a factory.

It is possible that Hyperion will go through several rounds of investor financing to bring their product to market. A prudent investor will understand the speculative risks at each stage.

For these reasons I stand by my prior comment that it is not reasonable to spend much time worrying about the plant location when there is so much other work to be done on getting the product ready for market.

There is no rocket science here. Hope is an essential element of the entrepreneurial spirit. It is necessary but not sufficient. Execution of a business plan is the other element. That's the rational part.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2009, 03:39 PM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,939,603 times
Reputation: 6270
Thumbs up Areva Opens Main Office in Idaho Falls Today

Some good financial news for a change. Areva opened their main Idaho Falls office for the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility today. Additionally, their timeline is ahead of schedule.

Per this KIFI News story, Areva plans on employing about 400 people at the facility, 1,000 construction workers will be needed to build it. Reportedly, the construction workers will start being hired in about a year and Areva hopes to use local workers as much as possible.

An interesting part of this article, to me, was Areva's statement about the 2,000- 3,000 indirect workers. I'm not sure if they mean hired by Areva or workers hired by other businesses to support the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility.

LocalNews8.com Idaho Falls, Pocatello - Weather, News, Sports - Areva Opens Idaho Falls Office

I know it is a year away, but I would certainly rather read this headline than most others today.

MSR
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2010, 05:26 AM
 
8,440 posts, read 11,939,603 times
Reputation: 6270
Lightbulb Areva Making Progress on Idaho Falls Facility

There are so many regs to meet and hoops to jump through for businesses like Areva to operate a plant related to nuclear energy in anyway. It seems like Areva got some good news:

From KIFI:

"The Department of Energy announced a $2 billion loan guarantee for Areva Inc. to construct a uranium enrichment plant east of Idaho Falls."

"Areva first announced the project was coming to eastern Idaho in May 2008 and still has to get an operational license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before the project is a green light."

“It’s one of the most important steps in moving this project forward and that has a lot to do with the financing of it,” said Bob Poyser, VP of regional affairs for Areva"


Additionally, a timeframe of hoping to have all permits and necessary licenses in place. Areva currently is saying June 2011 to have all of the paperwork secured, with construction on the $ 2 billion dollar faciity to follow in 2011. Anticipated start date of the plant operating would be in 2014.

The rest of this KIFI story can be reviewed at this link:

Areva Approved for $2 Billion Loan Guarantee - Local News Story - KIFI Idaho Falls (http://www.localnews8.com/news/23627124/detail.html - broken link)

KIDK's version:

Areva gains conditional loan approval | KIDK CBS 3 - News, Weather and Sports - Idaho Falls - Pocatello - Blackfoot, ID - Idaho Falls, Pocatello, Blackfoot - Idaho | Local & Regional (http://www.kidk.com/news/local/94532744.html - broken link) and

KPVI's Version:

AREVA Secures Loan Guarantee for Local Project - KPVI NEWS 6: Pocatello, Idaho Falls-Weather, Sports, News-


Other information can be reviewed via national sources.

It's good to hear something progressing forward for Areva

MSR
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2010, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Sacramento
459 posts, read 1,013,380 times
Reputation: 260
I don't get the nuclear hysteria in this country. Would you rather build 7 coal-fired plants or one nuclear plant?

I'd rather bury toxic waste 2000 feet below the surface than breathe in toxins from 7 coal-fired plants. :P
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2010, 09:46 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 12,465,899 times
Reputation: 1576
This is good news for E. Idaho. One more reason, the region will do better than the rest of the country with job production. On a somewhat related topic, I'm seeing more and more out of state license plates in IF recently. I can't confirm the stats, but my gut says many are moving here due to the better odds of finding meaningful work. That, is true progress.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2010, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Old Mother Idaho
25,713 posts, read 17,150,388 times
Reputation: 19637
Hi, SacTown...
Modern new-generation nuclear power plants, like those used throughout Europe and Japan, don't cost as much as 7 conventional plants, but they cost more than a single conventional plant, for sure.

The old American idea of building huge nuclear plants turned out to be wrong in a couple of important ways:
The scale of the plants was based on erronious theory. When the first big plants were designed, all of it was based on the much smaller power plants designed for submarines. X amount of power was put out by a sub plant, so 400X must result in 400 times more power. This turned out to be wrong.

The other problem was, when a big plant went down for any reason- refueling, repair, etc., a big hole was created in the power grid, and the big plants are much slower to come back on line.

And of course, the costs went through the roof by the 70's.

The new model is much smaller but more numerous plants, which are cheaper, more efficient, and safer. While all the other new technologies are used, Japan in particular has built a lot of very good nuclear plants which make very good sense for them. Japan has always had big problems with any oil or coal based operations, because it has no native supplies of either.

I think that there are really a lot of non-nuclear spin-offs that will develop from the Arriva facility. A few that come to mind right off the top are containers and specialized bottles, a nuclear capable transportation hub, specialized tenting and other covers, training facilities, uniform and protection suits and other apparel. The more you think about it, the more comes up that local entrepreneurs could manufacture, deliver and supply to other places. And this doesn't include all the computer stuff that could be developed.
Idaho Falls could indeed be the power equivalent of Silicon Valley. All it would take is the right mindset, and close contacts with Arriva as to what could be needed facilities and products.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Idaho > Idaho Falls

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top