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Old 07-29-2007, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Southeast Idaho
4,755 posts, read 16,566,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Hi MSR,

Thanks for your compliments. When I write I like to try and combine humor with legitimate points, although sometime miss on both accounts!

First, to my comment of "people here like to have babies"....you wanted the source. Here we go.

According to the NCHS, (National Center for Health Statistics), the top four states with the highest birthrates are:

1. Utah
2. Texas
3. Arizona
4. Idaho (almost tied with Arizona)

These are from 2004, but I seriously doubt the "frequency" of new babies has changed much since then.

Now, here is where my supposed "logic" comes in. Since Utah is way out in front of everyone else, (not even close), and Eastern Idaho relates in many ways to Utah, I end up with the conclusion that people like to have babies in Eastern Idaho!

As for how that helps the infrastructure, economics, etc. Well, it builds the population quicker, causing more need for housing, retail, schools, roads, the list goes on and on.

So let the baby-making continue and perhaps we all will be a little better off, economically, of course.
You're probably spot on. I can recall going in to my ob/gyn for a yearly exam and felt like the odd duck. Everyone else was visibly pregnant
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Old 07-29-2007, 09:14 PM
 
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Talking Hmmmm, well maybe there is some truth in your idea, PW72.

[quote=pw72;1167457]Hi MSR,

Thanks for your compliments. When I write I like to try and combine humor with legitimate points, although sometime miss on both accounts!

Wonderful trait IMO. I'll bet you are more accurate than off with you logic.

First, to my comment of "people here like to have babies"....you wanted the source. Here we go.

According to the NCHS, (National Center for Health Statistics), the top four states with the highest birthrates are:

1. Utah
2. Texas
3. Arizona
4. Idaho (almost tied with Arizona)

These are from 2004, but I seriously doubt the "frequency" of new babies has changed much since then. I agree with your thinking.

Now, here is where my supposed "logic" comes in. Since Utah is way out in front of everyone else, (not even close), and Eastern Idaho relates in many ways to Utah, I end up with the conclusion that people like to have babies in Eastern Idaho! Pocatello is in southeastern Idaho

As for how that helps the infrastructure, economics, etc. Well, it builds the population quicker, causing more need for housing, retail, schools, roads, the list goes on and on.

So let the baby-making continue and perhaps we all will be a little better off, economically, of course." - Of course, economically. I just didn't realize, pw, that you were hoping to eat at a Chuckie Cheese or shop at more kids clothing stores etc.

Besides, better economics, maybe new babies give us a little more hope and a little more to smile about each day.

Besides, none of us know which of these wonderful little babies might be the next Bill Gates, van Gogh or inspiration to mom or dad of how to get that beltway built around Idaho Falls etc.


Back to your about market impact, a new infant-toddler-kids clothing store, owned by 3 sisters who moved to Idaho Falls from 3 different states, if I remember correctly, just opened downtown. As mothers, they couldn't get some of the brand names they were use to in their previous states, and friends confirmed the same. So instead of just complaining about it did something to make the brands available to all who are looking for these brands of clothing. Now there is another kids clothing store for you to shop at, pw along with the other already existing kids stores, if you're interested. (as well as other shoppers).

The same concepts should hold true for the previous Salt Lakers/Provo residents who live in Pocatello. Then there are all of the young couples who married while at BYU-Idaho and perhaps are finishing their college or advanced training in Pocatello.

While this is just word of mouth info handed down over the generations, I've been told that young couples often have babies. However, I've heard (can't give you a source, though) that many are postponing their families given the cost of college and having to work often full time and attend school part-time.

PW, you are correct that another sector of the Idaho Falls more diverse economy is being "driven" by babies who can't drive.

Medically, babies from eastern ID, western WY and southern MT are being born at, or transferred to EIRMC NICU, as no other hospital in Idaho, except St. Luke's in Boise has the MFM and Neonatal Specialists to staff the high risk perinatal services plus a Level III NICU. So many babies who use to be flown to Salt Lake City now are cared for in Idaho Falls. More about this subject really should go on the Hospital/Medical Care in I.F. thread.

However, I simply wanted to acknolwedge that babies born throughout eastern ID - who eventually may live in Island Park, Ashton, St. Anthony, Rexburg, Rigby, Ririe, Teton, Shelley, Firth, Blackfoot, Chubbuck and Pocatello, along with other cities, are receiving care now in Idaho Falls. Previously, babies who were so preemie or ill, were only cared for at Salt Lake City Hospitals (and sometimes St. Luke's in Boise, if there was room and they didn't need surgery). Straight stats on birth numbers alone don't always correspond to the county, where the hospital is located, compared the county of residence for the parents and new baby.

I do have to agree children create different needs and opportunities for the market to meet. New goods and services, along with additional schools, Day Cares, store that sell items for new parents and infants/toddlers and older children are needed more. And most adults, without the need, would probably not patronize those businesses geared to serve our youngest members of society.

That being said, I still think INL and all their sub-contracted work has something to do with the growth. I read today about two different major subcontractors, ANNA being one, who are hiring engineers, nuclear scientists and other experienced chemists, biologists, and others in the areas ANNA specializes in (and a consulting firm from Billings, MT being the other sub-contractor also providers). They each have sub-contracts with INL and in ANNA's case, I believe it's a guaranteed 7 year contract (I might have gotten the two contractors confused of which is doing what and for how long).

Should anyone care to enter the discussion and clarify the role of subcontractors, PLEASE feel free to do so including the role local spin offs have played in diversifying the economy.

Read the info for yourself, plus data from the U.S. Census Bureau and decide for yourself whether Idaho Falls is growing because of the youngest residents in the County, or those who have moved in to accept new jobs.

Thanks for the interesting discussion, pw72.
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Old 07-29-2007, 09:33 PM
 
3,970 posts, read 12,467,442 times
Reputation: 1576
[quote=Mtn. States Resident;1168441]
Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Hi MSR,

Thanks for your compliments. When I write I like to try and combine humor with legitimate points, although sometime miss on both accounts!

Wonderful trait IMO. I'll bet you are more accurate than off with you logic.

First, to my comment of "people here like to have babies"....you wanted the source. Here we go.

According to the NCHS, (National Center for Health Statistics), the top four states with the highest birthrates are:

1. Utah
2. Texas
3. Arizona
4. Idaho (almost tied with Arizona)

These are from 2004, but I seriously doubt the "frequency" of new babies has changed much since then. I agree with your thinking.

Now, here is where my supposed "logic" comes in. Since Utah is way out in front of everyone else, (not even close), and Eastern Idaho relates in many ways to Utah, I end up with the conclusion that people like to have babies in Eastern Idaho! Pocatello is in southeastern Idaho

As for how that helps the infrastructure, economics, etc. Well, it builds the population quicker, causing more need for housing, retail, schools, roads, the list goes on and on.

So let the baby-making continue and perhaps we all will be a little better off, economically, of course." - Of course, economically. I just didn't realize, pw, that you were hoping to eat at a Chuckie Cheese or shop at more kids clothing stores etc.

Besides, better economics, maybe new babies give us a little more hope and a little more to smile about each day.

Besides, none of us know which of these wonderful little babies might be the next Bill Gates, van Gogh or inspiration to mom or dad of how to get that beltway built around Idaho Falls etc.


Back to your about market impact, a new infant-toddler-kids clothing store, owned by 3 sisters who moved to Idaho Falls from 3 different states, if I remember correctly, just opened downtown. As mothers, they couldn't get some of the brand names they were use to in their previous states, and friends confirmed the same. So instead of just complaining about it did something to make the brands available to all who are looking for these brands of clothing. Now there is another kids clothing store for you to shop at, pw along with the other already existing kids stores, if you're interested. (as well as other shoppers).

The same concepts should hold true for the previous Salt Lakers/Provo residents who live in Pocatello. Then there are all of the young couples who married while at BYU-Idaho and perhaps are finishing their college or advanced training in Pocatello.

While this is just word of mouth info handed down over the generations, I've been told that young couples often have babies. However, I've heard (can't give you a source, though) that many are postponing their families given the cost of college and having to work often full time and attend school part-time.

PW, you are correct that another sector of the Idaho Falls more diverse economy is being "driven" by babies who can't drive.

Medically, babies from eastern ID, western WY and southern MT are being born at, or transferred to EIRMC NICU, as no other hospital in Idaho, except St. Luke's in Boise has the MFM and Neonatal Specialists to staff the high risk perinatal services plus a Level III NICU. So many babies who use to be flown to Salt Lake City now are cared for in Idaho Falls. More about this subject really should go on the Hospital/Medical Care in I.F. thread.

However, I simply wanted to acknolwedge that babies born throughout eastern ID - who eventually may live in Island Park, Ashton, St. Anthony, Rexburg, Rigby, Ririe, Teton, Shelley, Firth, Blackfoot, Chubbuck and Pocatello, along with other cities, are receiving care now in Idaho Falls. Previously, babies who were so preemie or ill, were only cared for at Salt Lake City Hospitals (and sometimes St. Luke's in Boise, if there was room and they didn't need surgery). Straight stats on birth numbers alone don't always correspond to the county, where the hospital is located, compared the county of residence for the parents and new baby.

I do have to agree children create different needs and opportunities for the market to meet. New goods and services, along with additional schools, Day Cares, store that sell items for new parents and infants/toddlers and older children are needed more. And most adults, without the need, would probably not patronize those businesses geared to serve our youngest members of society.

That being said, I still think INL and all their sub-contracted work has something to do with the growth. I read today about two different major subcontractors, ANNA being one, who are hiring engineers, nuclear scientists and other experienced chemists, biologists, and others in the areas ANNA specializes in (and a consulting firm from Billings, MT being the other sub-contractor also providers). They each have sub-contracts with INL and in ANNA's case, I believe it's a guaranteed 7 year contract (I might have gotten the two contractors confused of which is doing what and for how long).

Should anyone care to enter the discussion and clarify the role of subcontractors, PLEASE feel free to do so including the role local spin offs have played in diversifying the economy.

Read the info for yourself, plus data from the U.S. Census Bureau and decide for yourself whether Idaho Falls is growing because of the youngest residents in the County, or those who have moved in to accept new jobs.

Thanks for the interesting discussion, pw72.
And thanks for the great reply. BTW, I HATE Chuck E. Cheese!
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:25 PM
 
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pw72 wrote,

"And thanks for the great reply. BTW, I HATE Chuck E. Cheese!"

Well pw72, I know there is suppose to be another McDonald's built somewhere around the Sunnyside exit, and I believe it's an A & W Rootbeer/TacoBell close by the exit too.

Maybe you'll just have to settle for one of those places, since you don't like Chuckie.

Then again, you could go high end: Sandpiper, Jakers, The Cellar, Collage etc.
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Old 07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
 
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Yes, another McDonald's would just be terrrific! I need more McDonald's options!

But, seriously, I have heard the Cellar is quite good...have not been yet.

A&W/Taco Bell combo. Hmmm. The decisions at the drive-thru speaker would have to be made with great diligence.

Sorry, don't mean to be "flip"...I consume more fast food than I probably should. But, population growth brings more of these outlets, kids add to it, and everyone wins. Even the health professionals who are dealing with the increased obesity. Perhaps, a NOT so funny result.
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Old 07-31-2007, 12:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Yes, another McDonald's would just be terrrific! I need more McDonald's options!

But, seriously, I have heard the Cellar is quite good...have not been yet.

A&W/Taco Bell combo. Hmmm. The decisions at the drive-thru speaker would have to be made with great diligence.

Sorry, don't mean to be "flip"...I consume more fast food than I probably should. But, population growth brings more of these outlets, kids add to it, and everyone wins. Even the health professionals who are dealing with the increased obesity. Perhaps, a NOT so funny result.
So true. Maybe we should start a chain about some of the finer restaurants.

I was just joking about a McDonald's, although rumor has it one will be built in the area. I wouldn't want to say anything that could be misunderstand by those who enjoy, support or own McDonald's franchises. Running a franchis is HARD WORK!
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Old 08-02-2007, 08:51 AM
 
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It is a very busy couple of weeks in Idaho Falls. See the top 10 to review activities.

In looking at he annual Duck Float, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club with proceeds going to Improvements on the Greenbelt, I noticed this year that while some ducks will be released in the regular fashion. But, the big event is being held at the Country Club with corporate sponsors "adopting a duck" with the major prizes being given there.

Since when did this change? Or, are the numbers overwhelming on the Greenbelt, so the Kiwanis Club decided to split the activities up with the larger donations and prizes being at the I.F. Country Club?
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Old 08-06-2007, 11:55 AM
 
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Arrow Now Veterinary Care Open 24/7 in Idaho Falls

I've asked Cleosmom to write more in detail about this as she knows far more than I about this subject. However, I wanted to post a general post on a couple of the Idaho Falls subject boards so pet owners in eastern ID know that 4 veterinarian practices are working together to provide a Veterinarian available 24/7. This means if your kittie or puppy etc. gets into an accident, or gets sick, instead of having to call the on-call vet for the practice that normally cares for your animal/animals you can go directly now to the clinic that has a Veterinarian in-house. Like a hospital E.R.- a Veterinarian and appropriate technicians are always available.

Having lived in much larger cities, I think many who return home to eastern ID or others who have decide to live here will find this new service a plus. I have lived in cities much larger than Boise, cities with populations more than 600,000 and metros 4-5X the census within the city limits. Access to 24 hour Veterinarian Care wasn't available in many of those cities until the last 5-10 years ( or so I've been told by Veterinarians who practiced in those respective cities), with the acception of U.S. cities where one of the 2-3 dozen Schools of Veterinary Medicine are located.

IMHO, I think this speaks highly of the dedicated Veterinarians in Idaho Falls who wanted to make bad situations easier for their clients, and perhaps have a better chance at saving some animals.


So see what Cleosmom writes about this subject. When I find the thread, I'll post it here. But for now, if you are traveling with a pet or are new to the area, know help is available for all the little and big paws (canine, feline, human) 24/7 in Idaho Falls.

MSR

P.S. They don't see horses, cattle or sheep. There are other Vets who do locally. The 24/7 practice is for small animals only.
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Old 08-06-2007, 01:05 PM
 
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Thumbs up Published in I.Q. Idaho

Quote:
Originally Posted by fiasco View Post
Here's my question, and maybe you can help answer it, MSR....


With all the incredible growth that IF is seeing in terms of restaurants and retail and the such, and with new people moving into the area by the thousands, where are the jobs coming from? I don't know of any new industries in the area, or any that have expanded greatly enough to justify how booming the retail industry has become. Is it a bubble just waiting to burst, or have I just not been paying attention??
fiasco,

I've wanted to add this info for a long time. However, it needed to be posted elsewhere first, like IdahoFalls.Com, after author Jeff Boyle, wrote the piece for I.Q. Idaho. I first saw this article about 4 months ago.

This is what Jeff Boyle, writing for a business journal, wrote a feature article about when encountering Idaho Falls about six months ago:

Eagle rock Takes Flight
Visionary Developers Reclaim the Snake River as the Heart and Soul of Idaho Falls
By Jeff Boyle, 3.22.2007 MT
from I.Q. Idaho


"Ball Ventures, renaissance partners, NAI Commerce One and McNeil Development are changing the face of Idaho Falls. The economic and commercial center of Southeast Idaho (Idaho’s second most populous region at almost 300,000), Idaho Falls is quickly becoming to the area what Boise is to the Treasure Valley.

"These business leaders have been more than eager to work with IQ Idaho in letting the rest of Idaho, and especially the Treasure Valley, in on the massive urban renewal effort in Idaho Falls.

"A few issues ago, IQ Idaho poked a little fun at Idaho for its not so secret, and to be honest, ridiculous and outdated regional and political rivalries in an article entitled, “Let’s Break this Thing Up.” The basic thrust of that article is that while life as an Idahoan is certainly something special, Idaho’s various regions and groups tend to resemble a dysfunctional family, fighting over affection, recognition and resources. On a recent trip to Idaho Falls, it became clear that perhaps there are some cracks in the proverbial wall historically in place between Idaho’s East and West. It also became very clear that big things aren’t just happening in Boise. The Upper Snake River Valley, with its Idaho Falls hub, has in virtually every sense become a major economic, business and political center to complement rather than threaten the Treasure Valley.

"Two decades ago or so, Boise was in much the same place Idaho Falls found itself circa Y2K. The parallels are intriguing: a rapidly growing population underserved by retail, dining and commercial offerings; a historical but beleaguered and largely sluggish downtown area; a highly educated workforce and a strong economy; access to some of the best outdoor and recreational opportunities in the country; and the influx of large numbers of new residents from large population centers around the country. Idaho Falls, like the Boise of old, has until very recently suffered from a serious lack of outside recognition and developmental vision. Interestingly, many I.F. residents like the obscurity.

"They’ve seen the population explosion in Boise and nearby Salt Lake City, and most residents offer a resounding “NO THANKS.” Unfortunately, the secret is getting out and the outdoorsmen and women of Idaho Falls will inevitably see increasing competition for fishing holes and camping spots.

"To me, the reawakening of the American city center is one of the most exciting phenomena of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Throughout much of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, America saw its commercial centers of gravity dissipated from downtown to suburban malls, chain restaurants, and the efficient but boring strip mall. Two decades ago, downtown Boise was devastated by the phenomenon. Downtown Boise has come back with a vengeance, and in 2007, Boise’s city center is one of the most delightful and charismatic downtowns in America, a source of municipal pride, and a great place to shop or spend an evening.

"There are a group of influential Idaho Falls developers who are convinced that the Idaho Falls City Center is ready for a similar revitalization, which to a large degree is already taking place. We think they’re right. How many U.S. cities have waterskiing access downtown, miles of beautiful river waterfront, waterfalls downtown, miles of greenbelt, and eagles, ospreys, ducks and geese sharing space with a metropolitan population? There’s a lot going on in Idaho Falls, but first, a little historical perspective.

"In the 1970s to mid-1980s, Idaho Falls’ historic downtown suffered a series of blows. The knockout punch occurred when a new mall opened in 1984 several miles across town near the City of Ammon on the east side of town. The hospital and medical profession quickly followed a few years later when the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center moved to the east side. Frankly speaking, Idaho Falls’ city center, even with all of its beautiful river front area, lost its energy.

"Idaho Falls, like many western cities, had practical beginnings. In the 1860s, a toll bridge was constructed to shake a little coin from travelers along the Old Montana Trail on their way from Salt Lake City to Montana. Soon, the humble crossing site became the town of Eagle Rock. Next came the railroad, regional agricultural commerce, facilities appropriate for the raucous and lascivious Wild West residents, a large Mormon influx from nearby Utah, and in 1891, the town of Eagle Rock grew into the city known as
Idaho Falls.

"For those of you from elsewhere in the state, avoid the temptation to roll your eyes at this article as a puff piece. Raw statistics demonstrate Idaho Falls’ economic prowess. Twenty-first century Idaho Falls is large enough to be classified as a “Metropolitan Statistical Area” by the U.S. Census Bureau and Bonneville County boasts one of the highest median incomes in the state. In 2006, only Hailey had a lower unemployment rate than Idaho Falls (2.5% and 2.6% respectively).

"While Idaho Falls has always been an economic and business power, development has thus far lagged. According to local business leaders and developers, the time is right for Idaho Falls to take itself to the next level.

"Idaho Falls’ Urban Renewal Snake River Landing Ball Ventures, LLC, founded by long-time Idaho Falls business leader Allen Ball, has readied over 400 acres of prime riverfront property along the Snake River between the new I-15 Sunnyside

"Road exit on the south and the Idaho Falls City Center exit on the

"North for a master planned development. According to Cortney Liddiard, CEO of Ball Ventures, the development is based on the notion of a “community within a community.”

"For those unfamiliar with Idaho Falls, it is difficult to have a sense of the scope of the project. It’s huge, even by big-city standards. Loaded with green space, parks, green belts, walking trails and public riverfront access, the project entails the construction of retail shops, premium office space, high-end hotel and restaurant locations, civic facilities, and residential and condominium developments that place it well on its way to becoming one of the premier destinations in south-eastern Idaho.

"The philosophy of the project is to allow people to live, work, shop and play without ever having to leave Snake River Landing. At this stage, rough site grading has been completed along with a mile or so of roadway running throughout the project. Multiple buildings are currently under construction, and ambitious landscape, streetscape and park improvements are scheduled to commence this spring. Its proximity to Interstate 15 makes the development attractive for many businesses.

"The positioning of the project is ideal to take advantage of population growth and the huge volume of tourists that pass through Idaho Falls annually on the way to Yellowstone Park, the Grand Tetons, and Jackson, Wyoming. The project is directly in line with the city’s overall growth strategy. At this month’s IQ Industry Outlook meeting, Mr. Liddiard made it clear that one of the major differences in the Idaho Falls of today versus that of just a few years ago is the vision and cooperation coming out of City Hall.

"According to Liddiard, the city’s willing assistance and encouraging presence has made it an indispensable partner in all new Idaho Falls’ redevelopment efforts.

"The City of Idaho Falls was recently ranked eighth on Inc. Magazine’s list of “Boomtowns ’06: Hottest Small Cities.” It was tenth on the list of Overall Best Cities. According to Inc. Magazine, “With a revitalized downtown district, Idaho Falls is big on small-town charm. But it also boasts a diverse band of high-tech companies primarily revolving around the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory.” The development at Snake River Landing seems to be that perfect marriage of charm and vision.

"Renaissance Partners Imagine taking on a project where the easy part required the acquisition of more than 50 acres spread among 15 separate landowners. Once that was accomplished, you face the unenviable logistical and environmental task of removing junk yards, dilapidated storage facilities, a butcher shop, an RV dealership, fuel storage tanks, an old bar, a house moving company, a county road, a bridge, a potato packing warehouse, a bridge and the accumulation of a century of junk and debris. There’s more.

"Mother Nature decided to throw her weight around. Extensive lava beds needed to be blasted, hauled away or crushed before any real redevelopment could be accomplished.

"Despite the obstacle s , Renaissance Partner s , LLP

"(“Renaissance”), the joint venture of two neighboring family businesses, made it happen. Located immediately off of the City Center Broadway exit, what was once a motley and random collection of old buildings and businesses has been transformed.

"Renaissance has constructed the first Marriott in Southern Idaho, worked with Wal-Mart on a Super Wal-Mart that opened in 2004, and arranged the belated arrival of Olive Garden to Idaho Falls that opened December of 2006. Still to come is a 10,000 square foot shopping district under construction, and ground-breaking for the first Ruby River Steak House in Idaho is only days away.

"The City of Idaho Falls couldn’t be happier. Similar plans for the area had crashed and burned due to lack of vision and resources. According to Kirk Hansen of Renaissance, there is plenty of credit to go around for the success of the project, naming specifically “Renaissance’s love and vision for the entrance to Idaho Falls, the cooperation with the Idaho Falls Redevelopment Agency, City Staff and County Officials, and the expertise of their real estate professionals” as the primary reasons for the ultimate success of the project. Taylor Crossing on the River McNeil Development, L.L.C. (“McNeil”) of Idaho Falls has turned a previously barren 45 acre stretch of Idaho Falls’ riverfront into a beautiful and seamless juxtaposition of nature, technology, art, architecture and function.

"The development’s philosophy is to provide business with aesthetic and functional space which is high end yet affordable. It really is quite extraordinary in both setting and design. At its center is a roundabout featuring what can only be described as a rugged waterfall style fountain with massive sculptures of eagles, mountain lions and other native Idaho wildlife. The chosen architectural theme is described by McNeil as “timeless” and has certainly raised the bar for other Idaho Falls developers. The development was aptly named after the original identity of Idaho Falls, which, in the mid 1800s was know as Taylor Crossing where travelers crossed the dangerous Snake River on a Toll Bridge built and maintained by early resident Matt Taylor. The name is appropriate as McNeil’s Taylor Crossing has proven no less visionary than its namesake. There was no shortage of short-sighted detractors in town who weren’t shy about their opinion that perhaps the idea was a bit high-brow for Idaho Falls. The success of the venture, as well as the economic and beautification impact of the project on the city has clearly proven the doubters wrong. NAI Commerce One NAI Commerce One is the Eastern Idaho affiliate of NAI Global, the world’s leading managed network of commercial real estate firms, with over 300 offices in 40 countries. The Idaho Falls based company started with four agents six years ago, and has grown to ten full time commercial real estate professionals with specializations to cover every real estate need. NAI Commerce One worked closely with Renaissance Partners for the land assemblage that produced sites for Super WalMart and Olive Garden restaurant, and is in various stages of development for further projects in Idaho Falls ’ gateway area such as KATSAM, LLC in bringing to pass a retail development called Eagle Rock Town Center just off Utah Avenue. Across the street on Pancheri Drive, they are working with Ball Ventures, LLC to bring in Snake River Landing, which will balance the retail growth on the south side of this growing area. According to NAI’s Steve Keim, the growth and development in Idaho Falls and other locations outside the Treasure Valley are key to the continued development of the State of Idaho. From a national perspective, companies are much more willing to invest in a state with two or more markets. Until recently, only Boise and the surrounding area were seen as a viable market for many national retailers. With the Treasure Valley squarely on the national radar, one of NAI Commerce One’s major jobs is to educate companies who may otherwise pass on Idaho about growing markets like Idaho Falls. Due to NAI’s international presence in the world’s most important markets, the brokerage lends a great deal of credibility to the area and significantly due to NAI Commerce One’s influence, many companies who would otherwise pass on Idaho are not only taking a second look, but committing to development both inside and outside of the Treasure Valley. There’s a lot going on in Eastern Idaho. With a strong economy, local business leaders who are choosing to reinvest in the community, and political leaders who are in step with the needs of the area, all of the indicators are there that the region will continue to play an increasing role in Idaho’s rise on the national scene. In May of this year, IQ Idaho will feature Idaho Falls and Eastern Idaho in a Special Report detailing East Idaho’s stunning outdoor beauty, unique lifestyle, vibrant business climate and diverse educational opportunities."
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Old 08-13-2007, 02:19 AM
 
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Post Idaho 2006 Census Regarding Where Hispanics Relocated in Idaho

Often we get asked about racial diversity and what cities are more racially diverse than others. Also, we get asked about population.

According to Idaho Statesman (Boise, Idaho news, sports, outdoors, business, jobs | Idaho Statesman) from 08.11.07 version, the story, "Census: Hispanic population rises across Idaho,"

"Between mid-2005 and mid-2006, more than 80% of new Hispanic residents settled in the south-central part of state.

"Every Idaho county but two saw its Hispanic population increase last year, according to a government report released this week.
However, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that Idaho's largest minority group is predominantly settling in the three biggest metropolitan areas and the south-central part of the state.

"The report said that of the 8,300 Hispanics who became new Idaho residents between mid-2005 and mid-2006, more than 80 percent settled in the Boise metro area of Ada and Canyon counties, Coeur d'Alene and surrounding Kootenai County, Idaho Falls and surrounding Bonneville County and the tri-county area around Twin Falls that covers Twin Falls, Jerome and Blaine counties.

"Those seven counties have drawn three of every four new Hispanic resident since the 2000 census. That means that since mid-2006 these counties have been home to over 62 percent of Idaho's entire Hispanic population."

There is more written in the story, but for my purposes these paragraphs illustrate what I, along with others on this board, have said. There is more racial diversity in Idaho Falls/Bonneville County than many places in the state.

Also from the same Idaho Statesman Story, here is a summary looking at the numbers.

By The Numbers:


County Total Population 2006Hispanic Population 2006 % Hispanic of 2006 Population% Hispanic Growth from 2005

State 1,466,465 138,870 9.5% 6.4%

Ada 359,035 21,568 6.0% 9.5% - - - Boise

Bannock 78,443 4,324 5.5% 4.9% - - - Pocatello

Bingham 44,051 6,326 14.4% 2.2% - -Blackfoot

Blaine 21,501 3,619 16.8% 9.8% - - Sun Valley, Hailey/Ketchum

Bonneville 94,630 8,139 8.6% 7.7% - - Idaho Falls

Canyon 173,302 35,527 20.5% 8.3% - - Nampa/Caldwell

Kootenai 131,507 4,136 3.1% 8.6% - - Coeur d'Alene

Twin Falls 71,575 8,261 11.5% 5.8% - -Twin Falls
================================================== ========


The story is comprehensive and addresses changes in all of Idaho's 44 Counties. However, since in eastern Idaho we mostly are asked about Idaho Falls, Pocatello, Blackfoot and sometimes Twin Falls, I included all of those counties.

I also added Kootenai County - home of Coeur d'Alene, Hayden, Post Falls etc. and Canyon County as it is metro Boise being the next county to Ada County, where Boise is located.
================================================== ========

Just to roughly break the info down, for 2006:

Bannock County: (Pocatello and Chubbuck) had a 2006 county population of 78,443 with 4,324 residents being Hispanic.

Bingham County: (Blackfoot) had a 2006 county population of 44,051 with6,326 Hispanic residents.

Bonneville County: (Idaho Falls and Ammon) had a 2006 population of 94,630 with 8,139 Hispanic residents.

Although the math has already been doen for 2007 estimates that shows Bonneville County at 103,000K, sometimes it is nice to see the breakdown for yourself to see the difference in the County Populations 2006: Bannock - 78,443 and Bonneville - 94,630.

Many people think because Bannock and Bonneville Counties use to be similar in size they remain the same size. The stats say otherwise. 94,630-78,443 = 16,187 more residents in Bonneville County LAST YEAR. 2007 estimates a much larger difference.

Read this and decide for yourself if Idaho has racial diversity and where.
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