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Old 05-07-2010, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Caldwell
464 posts, read 1,110,843 times
Reputation: 271

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Quote:
Originally Posted by heymon View Post
and please dont play it like city people cant build anything hahahah lets see you country pokes build a 200 story friggin steel building stright up baby and climb around all day with out ropes with out killing yourslef city people are way ahead of country people i read alot of posts about people and their dirty hands building their own homes at 60 and 70 yrs old and this is what americas about and all that garbage trash can stuff and what not but let me tell you unless youve seen some big contsruction sites in the big city you dont know what americas about some big citites have the most techno buildings in the world and alot of hard working city people put alot of sweat into building them high rizes and sky scrapers and their amazing , our great country isnt just about being a country folk buidling a home with vynyl siding its about how in 100 years this countries bacame super succefull in technology propelling us beyond everyone else , There is good things about california i know ive lived there and good things about idaho although idaho does not comptete with california or there would be 40 million people there living food for thought is always good for breackfast
If you like people....LOTS of people...move to California and be surrounded by tons of culture and diversity. Not one culture, but many. California is not a melting pot, California likes to keep things divided and seperate.

I don't like racial or ethnic divisions, so I am looking to leave. Plus California is nearly bankrupt and even though we already pay the highest tax rate of all 50 states, taxes will need to go up again as citizens refuse to allow any cuts to any programs - its madness.

But yeah, California is great...
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Old 05-07-2010, 11:50 AM
 
28 posts, read 29,813 times
Reputation: 17
Northern Idaho winter is not "dry cold". It's definitely a "wet cold". It's cloudy, damp, icy, snowy. There is nothing "dry" about it.
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Old 05-07-2010, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Caldwell
464 posts, read 1,110,843 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimmyzee View Post
Northern Idaho winter is not "dry cold". It's definitely a "wet cold". It's cloudy, damp, icy, snowy. There is nothing "dry" about it.
I think they are discussing the humidity level. The mugginess of a hot day. Anywhere it rains will have a "wet cold".

On a warm day, the humidity will not bring a "wet heat".
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Old 05-07-2010, 01:09 PM
 
28 posts, read 29,813 times
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The humidity level of CDA in the winter is high. The air is saturated with water. It's not a "dry cold".
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Old 05-07-2010, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Caldwell
464 posts, read 1,110,843 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by zimmyzee View Post
The humidity level of CDA in the winter is high. The air is saturated with water. It's not a "dry cold".
Again, we are talking about humidity during warm weather. The only dry cold I know of exists in Antarctica where it gets .015 inches of rain per year.

All rainy or snowy weather is "wet", with 100% humidity. Humidity is not uncomfortable until it is combined with warmth. 90 degrees with 100% humidity is quite unpleasant. 30 degrees with 100% humidity is just winter.
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Old 05-07-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Moscow
2,223 posts, read 3,872,778 times
Reputation: 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacTown11 View Post
Again, we are talking about humidity during warm weather. The only dry cold I know of exists in Antarctica where it gets .015 inches of rain per year.

All rainy or snowy weather is "wet", with 100% humidity. Humidity is not uncomfortable until it is combined with warmth. 90 degrees with 100% humidity is quite unpleasant. 30 degrees with 100% humidity is just winter.
Actually you are wrong. It is possible to have snow with ALMOST no water content. And it is possible for the air at that time to be so dry that it causes nose bleeds, chapped lips, etc.

Additionally, humidity combined with cold makes it FEEL much colder than it is. I would rather be in -65 with low humidity than +5 with high humidity.
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Old 05-07-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Caldwell
464 posts, read 1,110,843 times
Reputation: 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keim View Post
Actually you are wrong. It is possible to have snow with ALMOST no water content. And it is possible for the air at that time to be so dry that it causes nose bleeds, chapped lips, etc.

Additionally, humidity combined with cold makes it FEEL much colder than it is. I would rather be in -65 with low humidity than +5 with high humidity.
Fascinating. So, which is more likley in NID? cold and high humidity and cold and low humidity?

I was speaking from experience, but my experience only goes down to about the high 20 degree range and I've never felt rain with no humidity.

Are there some places worse than others in NID?
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Old 05-07-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Moscow
2,223 posts, read 3,872,778 times
Reputation: 3134
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacTown11 View Post
Fascinating. So, which is more likley in NID? cold and high humidity and cold and low humidity?
I lived in Alabama at one point. Compared to Bama, NID doesn't get humid. I also lived in eastern Montana (Where I experienced the dry snow, and -65). Compared to that, NID is moist. But I still can't bring myself to call it humid. I'd say most of NID is comparatively low humidity. You don't sweat a lot in the summer, and it doesn't have the "sting" of a cold humid winter. Bama was REALLY cold at 25 degrees and 90% humidity. Montana wasn't bad at -20 and 10% humidity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SacTown11 View Post
I was speaking from experience, but my experience only goes down to about the high 20 degree range and I've never felt rain with no humidity.
Don't get me wrong-rain comes with an increase in humidity. But 100% humidity doesn't equate to rain. Humidity is the water IN the air, not the water FALLING THROUGH the air.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SacTown11 View Post
Are there some places worse than others in NID?
As far as humidity, not in my experience. The key to remember is that in NID the clouds get stacked up against the mountains as they head east. This causes our moist fall, and overcast winters.
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Old 05-09-2010, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas / GV
508 posts, read 1,021,481 times
Reputation: 175
now granted it wasnt perfect (growing up there) but it did have its highlights. Beautiful place to live... horrible place to try and find something to do... just not a lot of activities outside 4H, Driving around the old logging roads and well hell i will admit it... cow tipping.

the schools suck so if you have kids or plan on having kids... just dont plan on them being doctors... i had a teacher in lake [MOD CUT] high tell me we won Nam and i got kicked out of class cause i told her she was wrong...

private school isnt much better from what i hear... think homeschool....

if you do come up... remember all your traffic rules... out of towners always get tickets.. the town motto is

"come on vacation leave on probation"

on thing ex-idahoan did have right though... if your not light complected stay out of sandpoint... its not a nice place to go.... everywhere else is normal. :-)
(source: experience)

Last edited by Sage of Sagle; 05-09-2010 at 10:58 PM.. Reason: Avoid profanity
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Old 12-01-2010, 12:22 PM
 
6 posts, read 14,597 times
Reputation: 10
Actually - dry cold is extremely common in Colorado. We can get 2 feet of snow that is practically devoid of moisture to the point that you can shovel your sidewalk with a leaf blower. Of course, we live at 6300 feet. It is routinely below zero and still very bearable. The 40s become shorts weather in March. I've found that it is virtually impossible to explain dry cold to someone who hasn't experienced it or who hasn't felt truly wet cold like back East or the Midwest.
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