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Old 08-19-2012, 06:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
Toronto is not in the USA.
Oh right, I forgot that cities don't exist when they require a border crossing. Silly me.
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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Chicago is now rated as an Alpha+ City.

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP released their list of the "26 Cities of Opportunity" with 66 variables. There are 5 US Cities listed: Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York City, and San Francisco. Regardless of the criteria chosen to compare the US cities, NYC is #1, followed by SF, Chicago, Houston and LA.

Cities of Opportunity: Detailed study of the world
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL SouthWest Suburbs
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I would speculate the two are connected thru business
Example

caterpillar downstate HQ and has a large presence in the Chicaoland area.
State Farm Insurance Downstate HQ , national presence.

Transportation is a big industry in the Chicaogo are along with many warehouses and logistic operations located downstate.

The rivers of Illinois transport goods throug our state while navigating towards the Mississippi.

We are connected through our higher levels of education.

We are connected thru our National Guard.

We are connected simply by infrastructure.
Agriculture is a large export in Illinois and shares common ground with the exchanges.


Guess instead of looking at the differences we do share common ground.

Many families have ties to downstate as the state was partly settled from South to North .
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Old 08-19-2012, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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I don't know how the state was exactly settled. Peoria is oldest on the river. The first fort was downstream half dozen miles or so. The villagers in Peoria ware French settlers that came in the 17th century. If I understand how it was settled, it was explored by the same man who discovered Louisiana who then came up the Mississippi and explored the Illinois River Valley, discovered the bluffs and the area that would become Peoria. I don't recall if he built Fort St. Louis, and then Fort and Peoria. Fort St. Louis II was several ,miles north of Peoria and built after the first was destroyed. I had family from NY and VA that settled in IL after the RW and before the CW, and a families that settled after the CW. These emigrant settlers, and their descendants, fought in both wars, and they all settled in Fulton and Tazewell Counties where their descendants live today.

Last edited by linicx; 08-19-2012 at 08:06 PM..
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
I don't know how the state was exactly settled. Peoria is oldest on the river. The first fort was downstream half dozen miles or so. The villagers in Peoria ware French settlers that came in the 17th century. If I understand how it was settled, it was explored by the same man who discovered Louisiana who then came up the Mississippi and explored the Illinois River Valley, discovered the bluffs and the area that would become Peoria. I don't recall if he built Fort St. Louis, and then Fort and Peoria. Fort St. Louis II was several ,miles north of Peoria and built after the first was destroyed. I had family from NY and VA that settled in IL after the RW and before the CW, and a families that settled after the CW. These emigrant settlers, and their descendants, fought in both wars, and they all settled in Fulton and Tazewell Counties where their descendants live today.
I believe the earliest settlement of Illinois took place along the Ohio River, the original route to the transappalachian west. and that settlement definitely was related to Virginia and to Appalachia. that southern influence is evident throughout the southern reaches of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.

Don't forget the story of way-southern-Illinois Shawneetown and its bank that wouldn't give a loan to the new backwoods settlement of Chicago because "it was too far from Shawneetown to amount to anything."
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Old 08-19-2012, 08:48 PM
 
Location: not Chicagoland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
I believe the earliest settlement of Illinois took place along the Ohio River, the original route to the transappalachian west. and that settlement definitely was related to Virginia and to Appalachia. that southern influence is evident throughout the southern reaches of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.

Don't forget the story of way-southern-Illinois Shawneetown and its bank that wouldn't give a loan to the new backwoods settlement of Chicago because "it was too far from Shawneetown to amount to anything."
The frst Kaskaskia was founded in 1703, Cahokia was settled in 1699, and Prairie du Rocher was founded in 1722. There was also a lot of other French settlements throughout the state. But yes, most of the settling of Illinois occurred along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers.

Last edited by plates; 08-19-2012 at 08:59 PM..
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Old 08-19-2012, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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From what I read of Ohio history the first cabin was built in 1805. Within 200 years my families had moved from NY 1696, thru NJ and into PA. The first to move to Ohio arrived in 1813. Brothers from this family moved thru Indiana and Iowa to settle in Kansas and OK. The second family was nephew of #1. His two boys moved into Illinois. One settled in Fulton County and the other in Champaign County. Another family moved into IL and settled in the NW and thence moved into Knox County and last into Tazewell County. My other Virginians came through Springfield, stayed a short time but didn't like the prairie. They too pushed on and settled in Tazewell County. Between 1833 and 1853 they were all settled in the two counties. There were only two siblings who left until 100 years later.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
According to the State Treasurer that is true a large portion of state income is from Cook County. It is also true a large portion of state funds are returned to Cook County in State funding to schools. .
It is also true that we're comparing Chicagoland to "downstate". Look at Cook, Will, DuPage, and Lake together. Net, on everything (education, social safety net, transportation, etc.), the region is far and away a net payor of funds to the rest of the state.

Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
If you insist on comparing Peoria to X then find a City of 125,000 that is on a large body of water. Then we might have something to talk about.
I can find a city that is over twice the size on a large body of water that has a bigger university, better beer, and more natural scenery than Peoria that also happens to be closer to IL's largest urban area. That city is called Madison. That's my point. If you want to find amenity X closer to where more people live (both in Chicago and in surrounding states' major uban centers), the most proximate amenities are generally not located within Illinois' borders once you leave greater Chicago to look for them. Galena is 3 hrs from Chicago. Several charming lake towns closer. Champaign Urbana is 2:30 away. Roughly the same as Madison and further than Notre Dame and Purdue.

Similarly, what is someone from Milwaukee, St. Louis, or Indianapolis (three largest cities closest to IL) going to venture into IL for that they don't have at their disposal closer to home? It's not the IL doesn't offer anything. It's that there is very little that IL offers that can't be found closer to home for larger urban areas within a few hours drive of the IL amenities.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:22 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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1673 Peoria was explored by Louis Joliet and Fr. Jacques Marquette; the first baptism was performed
1680 Fort Crevecoeur was built by Robert Cavalier Sieur de LaSalle and Henri de Tonti
1691 Fort Pimiteoui was built by Francois Daupin de LaForest and Henri de Tonti.
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Old 08-20-2012, 03:01 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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There is a big difference between making a statement "comparing X to Y" and asking as If there is a "connection between X and Y?". The one thing I do know is that Edge is neither ignorant, nor would ever suggest the absurdity of comparing Chicago to downstate, as all it accomplishes is to make Chicago sound like the schoolyard braggart with an inferiority complex.

The point has already been made that there is little if any connection between Cook County and downstate. Whether or not anyone thinks there are amenities in IL outside of Chicago is subject to personal interpretation and practical experience. There are no major urban centers outside of Chicago except Rockford.

As for the rest? Meh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago76 View Post
It is also true that we're comparing Chicagoland to "downstate". Look at Cook, Will, DuPage, and Lake together. Net, on everything (education, social safety net, transportation, etc.), the region is far and away a net payor of funds to the rest of the state.

I can find a city that is over twice the size on a large body of water that has a bigger university, better beer, and more natural scenery than Peoria that also happens to be closer to IL's largest urban area. That city is called Madison. That's my point. If you want to find amenity X closer to where more people live (both in Chicago and in surrounding states' major uban centers), the most proximate amenities are generally not located within Illinois' borders once you leave greater Chicago to look for them. Galena is 3 hrs from Chicago. Several charming lake towns closer. Champaign Urbana is 2:30 away. Roughly the same as Madison and further than Notre Dame and Purdue.

Similarly, what is someone from Milwaukee, St. Louis, or Indianapolis (three largest cities closest to IL) going to venture into IL for that they don't have at their disposal closer to home? It's not the IL doesn't offer anything. It's that there is very little that IL offers that can't be found closer to home for larger urban areas within a few hours drive of the IL amenities.
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