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Old 04-01-2013, 10:27 AM
 
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Hi there. Hubby has been transferred and we are moving to Peoria. We are looking for a good neighborhood to raise our 9 and 10 year olds. Obviously we have looked at Dunlap (and the school district) but it is out of our price range so we're looking at North Peoria in the Richwoods school district. However, after driving around this weekend we have realized that the neighborhoods are all quite different from each other. We'd like a neighborhood with kids and good neighbors who look out for each other.

So, we're looking at Lynnhurst, Lake Park, Hawthorne Hills, Tomar Knolls. Idyllbrook, Glen Hills, Glen Court.

Or the following condos/townhouses: cress creek villas, yorkshire village, charter oak

Any thoughts on any of these and any other neighborhoods I should consider?

Thanks for your time.
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Old 04-01-2013, 12:10 PM
 
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A couple more Richwoods feeder subdivisions -- Hawley Hills, which is very conveniently located, and there's also one (maybe it is Idyllbrook) off of Allen Road and War Memorial Drive, roughly. (Of course, I'd confirm that any home you're considering is in fact zoned for Richwoods H.S.)

Added: A few more to look at - Northmoor Hills, Rolling Acres, and there's also one across Northmoor Rd. from Rolling Acres; I don't know its name but a street called "Imperial" runs through it, I think. All of these are very close to Richwoods H.S.
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Old 04-02-2013, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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There are two things to understand about Peoria. You children will be moved every two years to a new school with new teachers until high school. The NW Peoria suburbs get horrendous storms and the occasional tornado. The farther NW you move past Allen Road along US 150, the greater the possibility of being affected by these storms. They move out of NE Fulton County and into NW Peoria County.

Rolling Acres is a large subdivision of older, well maintained homes of variou size and design. Most have large lots, the attached garage and a basement. The area is between US 150 and University N/S and Northmoor Road and Glen Avenue E/W. There is a subdivision next to it that is not quite as nice in my opinion. The good news is, depending upon where you buy, you're kids can walk to Richwoods high school. It is also easy access in an out of Rolling Acres as there is more than one access point.

If you don't like the idea of moving your kids to different schools then the next option is to look at Peoria Heights K-12 schools. Where you ultimately live may depend upon where hubby works and how far he is willing to drive.
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Old 04-02-2013, 07:37 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doglover5 View Post
there's also one across Northmoor Rd. from Rolling Acres; I don't know its name but a street called "Imperial" runs through it, I think. All of these are very close to Richwoods H.S.
Looks like that one is called Richwood Knolls. Thank you. So all these neighborhoods are good, solid neighborhoods? That is nice to hear. Peoria is very different from what I am used to and it is hard wrapping my brain around the layout.

linicx, we've considered Peoria Heights however outside the immediate drive by the river with the HUGE (too big for us and too expensive) houses, the rest of the neighborhoods we drove through weren't in great condition. Are there areas that you would recommend that are nice, solid neighborhoods that haven't been so hard hit by the economy?
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Old 04-03-2013, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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There is more to Peoria Heights than meets the eye. It actually begins in the IL river and extends to Knoxville on the west, and to War Memorial Drive on the southern border. PH has never been economically depressed. It has old neighborhoods, and McMansions just like Peoria. The reason the older 'hoods with the smaller houses still exist is because the houses were very well constructed quality home for its time. North of Glen and West to Knoxville are very nice homes. Also on Montclair and Miller Ave

The Children's Hospital is in Peoria with 3 other hospitals. The large parks and most of the activities and museums are in Peoria. You'll find a dozen grocers and independent vendors, 2 malls plus a half dozen or more shopping centers, a diverse culture, history, performing arts, social groups and churches that represent all major denominations. You'll find gifted, autistic, special ed, in Peoria public schools. plusMontessori and church schools, 2 colleges, 2 nursing schools, medical school, and trade schools in Peoria. Low income students who graduate from a Peoria high school are eligible to apply for a 2 year tuition/books grant for college or a trade school. You won't find Trader Joe's in the Peoria area, but you will find Costco, a permanent farmers market, Sam's Club, a natural food store, an international market, and a 1000 restaurants. This is the Peoria area in a nutshell. Peoria is not so much a political animal as all views are well represented. None dominates as it does in other areas. .

If you want your children to go to K-12 in the place where you live -- your options are limited. Bartonville, Brimfield, Dunlap, Farmington, or Peoria Heights in Peoria county, Morton, Robein (K-8), and Washington in Tazewell County, or Germantown Hills (K-8), Metamora,or Eureka in Woodford County.

Peoria is not a flat land locked Grid. It follows the course of the river which is 90 miles in Central IL. The river is actually nearly 300 miles long - the longest and largest river in the state. It divides the state in two. Peoria is built built among towering hills and it sprawls. The streets are laid out NE/SW, N, S, W, E. The river is to the EAST PH is NE.

"Below the hill" (below Moss Ave and W. Main St.) all the major streets between Western to the west and the McCluggage Bridge (US 150) runs NE and SW. The streets are: Water, Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Perry. PH is Northest of Peoria.

Once you get above the hill between Sterling and Prospect the main streets are E-W: Nebraska, McClure, (Wisconsin), Forest Hill, War Memorial US 150(W-NW) , Lake, Glen, Pioneer Parkway. All of these streets except Wisconsin and Pioneer Parkway extend from Sterling to Prospect.

The E/W above the hill: Farmington Road, and Martin Luther King Avenue (old 7th street). Farmington Road connects to the town of Farmington. Martin Luther connects to Bellevue.These two roads run parallel and connect west of Peoria on IL 116.

Major N/S are hills at one point. Beginning farthest west is Limestone in Bartonville. Moving into Peoria: Sterling and Park Rd (off Farmington Road) Western, McArthur (Cedar St. Bridge to University & W.Main), State, Fulton, Main, Hamilton. Spring, Abington, Forest Park (PH), Detweiler Drive.

When you get above the hill (Moss and Main and cross I-74) the major N/S streets are Sterling, University, Sheridan, Knoxville (IL 40), Lake and Prospect. All of these streets except Sheridan and Sterling extend from Nebraska to Pioneer Parkway (5-7 miles).

If you remember the malls are to the WEST of University, and the river is to the EAST You should be fine. The way Peoria expanded confuses drivers who grew up driving in a N/S/E/W grid like Chicago, Mpls, St. Louis, etc.. As I grew up in central Illinois I have the same problem in a grid city. Peoria also has its share of cul-de-sac streets and courts that are closed, too.

Five bridges connect Peoria and Tazewell Counties: NE to SW: McCluggage Bridge (US 150) , Murray Baker (I-74), Bob Michael, Cedar Street, Shade-Lowan (474). ?? bridge SW of Bartonville at Rt 9 connects Peoria, Tazewell and Fulton /countieswith Pekin . The farthest SW is the Scott Lucas Bridge that connects Mason County and Fulton County at Havana.

If you move to a smaller community you want: 24/7 paid police, 24/EMT on site, and a paid Fire Chief with 24/7 volunteer on duty and on call. Do not depend upon a realtor to know the difference or the answer; they don't. The Police and Fire Department should know what their services are. PH, Washington and Morton do have these services. They are middle management and upper income communities. I cannot say the same for lower income, or smaller communiies.

I cannot stress this enough: Police and Fire services are not the same in every small community in the Peoria area, or in the state of Illinois.

PH is quirky but it a good way; it always has been. If you live in the City of Peoia is has the largest and oldest park system in the state. If you live next to, or across from,. a park -- you will pay a special park tax. Illinois real estate taxes support schools and essential services such as hospitals, county fire and police, etc.. The park tax supports the zoo, building and ground maintenance, and park events.

Peoria has one of the nicest park systems in the Midwest. It is largest and oldert in Illinois. And its free. You do not buy a pass to enter any Peoria park. Parking is free at the vast majority of the events. You do need to reserve space if you are holding a large family event at the park and you need picnic tables and grill. .

Last edited by linicx; 04-03-2013 at 08:57 AM..
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Old 12-25-2013, 03:20 PM
 
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We might also be moving due to a change in employment. We are from Utah and haven't been to Peoria before. We have 2 little kids. Did you find a good neighborhood that you liked and that is safe for children and family friendly?
I'd appreciate some leads. THANKS!
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Old 12-25-2013, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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The OP has not posted for 9 months. They may have remained in Chicago.

Peoria is a large and generally family friendly town that loves kids as evidenced by the large parks and opportunity for kids to learn outside of school. A new children's museum recently opened, plus you will find children's theater for the performing arts.

Peoria is a STEM city that is very diverse in the housing stock, shopping, entertainment, outdoor activities, culture, and a large and active religious community. Housing stock ranges from Victorian to new, condo, duplex, loft, apartment, single family. One can find a very nice 3-bedroom in the $100,000 - $200,000 price range. You can also find homes in the $500,000 to million dollar price range.

Many of the neighborhoods have kids, dogs and are walkable. You can probably find everything you need or want except Trader Joe's and skiing.

Peoria traffic is well planned. Most of the subdivisions have feeder streets to the streets with the heaviest traffic: Allen, Knoxville, War Memorial (US 150), Sterling, and University. These are four and five lane streets that connect to shopping centers and the largest national box stores. Yes, you can find Chuck E. Cheese as easily as Old Navy, and places where kids can walk, run, climb, slide, and ride bikes.

I personally like Rolling Acres because it is convenient to shopping, yet is is a family friendly area away from noise of the city.
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Old 12-25-2013, 07:43 PM
 
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We moved into a neighborhood called Lake of the Woods in a town just north of Peoria called Dunlap. The schools are awesome, the teachers caring. The neighbors are friendly and interested and the neighborhood has kids. It also has access to a lake in the summer with lifeguards. The neighborhood is not in Dunlap proper which is a small little ruralish town but feels more like an extension of the city. If your looking for good schools, I highly recommend it here.
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Old 12-26-2013, 01:20 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,543 posts, read 28,312,035 times
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Although it has the feel of a small town, Lake Of The Woods Estates is legally a Subdivision of 400 homes in Peoria County.
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Old 01-08-2014, 04:47 PM
 
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great! Thanks a lot
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