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Old 08-06-2013, 03:44 PM
 
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Portland, Rome, Seattle, New York City, and London are all cities that are on the 40th parallel north line and up that don't get the extreme cold winters that cities like Chicago, Minneapolis, and Cleveland get.

What is going on here
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Old 08-06-2013, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Chicago
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Notice what those other cities have in common: they're all coastal cities.

In the middle of the continent there are no ocean currents to moderate regional temperatures.
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Old 08-06-2013, 04:42 PM
 
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That and we have a southern wind current from the Gulf of Mexico and a western wind current from Canada. One of the reasons why Chicago is the "windy city". They seem to combine and float up through Albany and Boston, but not through New York City at all, which also contributes to a more normalized temperature there along with the fact that it's on the coast. (it's a subtropical climate compared to midwestern cities' continental climates)
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Old 08-06-2013, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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Chicago is perfectly placed for hot and cold air mixtures which result in the crazy weather we always see.
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Old 08-06-2013, 09:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Domino369 View Post
That and we have a southern wind current from the Gulf of Mexico and a western wind current from Canada. One of the reasons why Chicago is the "windy city". They seem to combine and float up through Albany and Boston, but not through New York City at all, which also contributes to a more normalized temperature there along with the fact that it's on the coast. (it's a subtropical climate compared to midwestern cities' continental climates)
make sense
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Old 08-07-2013, 10:35 AM
 
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"Continentality" is the climatic phenomenon. It has to do with the differences in thermal conductivity and capacity of land vs water. Check out this slide show for a brief explanation:

http://www.slideshare.net/danielrtod...ation-17126152
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Old 08-07-2013, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
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The question should be: "Why are Portland, Rome, Seattle, New York City, and London so warm in the winter?"
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Old 08-07-2013, 10:52 AM
 
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I've heard folks say that winters are significantly colder even once you get into some of the far north suburbs of NYC (ie. northern Westchester County and beyond). That's how quickly the climate zone can change over there. As someone else mentioned, once you hit Albany, NY, you're probably in a similar or even worse climate than Chicago at that point.
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
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The farther one moves north it is cooler with shorter summers and longer winters. A good deal of the Midwest, particularly Iowa and Illinois are top corn producing states. There isn't anything hotter or more humid than a cornfield. Also Illinois is nearly a peninsula with large bodies of water that surround it on three sides and divide it in two between St. Louis and Chicago.
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:43 AM
 
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Yeah it's also fascinating how different the climate can be on the two sides of Lake Michigan as well. I've found, for example, that the snow is worse on the Indiana & Michigan sides of Lake Michigan. On the flipside, the temperatures aren't quite as low. The water on the Michigan side is also warmer in the summer than the Wisconsin side.

Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
The farther one moves north it is cooler with shorter summers and longer winters. A good deal of the Midwest, particularly Iowa and Illinois are top corn producing states. There isn't anything hotter or more humid than a cornfield. Also Illinois is nearly a peninsula with large bodies of water that surround it on three sides and divide it in two between St. Louis and Chicago.
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