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Old 06-02-2020, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
5,458 posts, read 8,174,868 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin David Steele View Post
Many of the examples shared here are familiar to me. My mother and her family speaks that way. She also often says 'cooshion' in place of 'cushion'. One of her favorite words is 'cattywampus'.

https://benjamindavidsteele.wordpres...with-a-wampus/
https://www.gocomics.com/bc/2020/06/02
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Old 06-16-2020, 01:26 PM
 
32 posts, read 58,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ischyros View Post
My parents weren't that way, but my grandparents most definitely had a "davenport" in the "front room". Bedrooms were also addressed by what direction they were in. There was the "west bedroom" and the "east bedroom".

My grandmother did the same thing! "go put this in the north bedroom" or "south bedroom" and it took me until adulthood to figure out which bedroom was which because they were all on the same (west!) side of the house lol

She also had the davenport in the front room and a den instead of a family room.

And Hawaii was pronounced "ha-why-ya"

She did a funny pronunciation of Iowa also but I can't remember how it went. It included an R (like warsh) and it always made me cringe and ask her to repeat herself because I wasn't sure exactly what she was trying to say lol
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Old 06-16-2020, 05:03 PM
 
Location: 78745
4,503 posts, read 4,612,137 times
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I remember when alot people called couches "davenports". I don't know where the term "davenport" came from. I don't think "davenport" was a regional term. I think it was used all over the nation because I use to hear some people on tv refer to it as a "davenport". I thought maybe "Davenport" was the name of the person who invented the type of furniture that is known today as a "couch" or a "sofa". Actually, I don't think I even heard the term "sofa" until sometime in junior high school (7th, 8th and 9th grades, 1967-1969). My entire life, my family always referred to it as a "couch". We never called it a "sofa" or a "davenport".

I use hear the State of Hawaii getting pronounced as "Haw-wah-ya" all the time, but not so much anymore. I'm 65 now but when I was growing up in Indiana, I use to hear alot of the old-timers pronounce the State of Iowa as Eye-Oh-Way.

We also called it a front room - never a living room. The way the house was, we'd step directly from the front step into the front room, and there would be our couch, chairs and tv.

In my mind, a "living room" is what people who also had a "formal dining room" or a "den" called it. My 1st wife, her family called it a "living room". They didn't call it the "front room". And when you stepped into their house, you stepped into a "foyer" - that's pronounced as "Foy-yay". I think that's a French word. You had to go thru the foyer in order to get to the living room. Her family also ate their meals in the "dining room" and my family ate our meals in the "kitchen". Their house was in one of the nicer parts of Muncie and our house was in an area of Muncie known as "Shedtown".
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Old 06-16-2020, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
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According to the OED, the name origin of davenport is unknown, perhaps the name of the maker. And originally is was davenport and sofa, now it's sofa and couch.

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Old 08-03-2020, 05:03 PM
 
29 posts, read 43,469 times
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If you are from NW Indiana, you'll hear the word "pants" pronounced "paaaynts". My wife draws out the A a long ways. Another one here is Milan. That town is pronounced..."mylon". NW Indiana has the Chicago sort of dialect going on. You are just as apt to hear "dem, dees, and dose" up there for "them, these, and those".

Someone else made the comment on fish pronounced "feesh". That's how my dad always said it, too. However, he was from Illinois.

I once heard a lady call Attica "ATEEKA". She wasn't from Indiana. I wondered if they pronounced Attica like that in NY then.
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Old 08-16-2020, 07:51 PM
 
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That twang is what linguists call the "Hoosier Apex", a bulge of southernisms that cover the lower Wabash River valley from about Clinton southward. I grew up in the center of the Apex, and all of these descriptions fit - much of the way of speaking comes a little more from the throat; listen to Patrece Dayton on WTHI, or to local commercials there. Warsh, Mondee, Tuesdee, Wednesdee; cricks (and even a few southern "runs"), car accidents are "wrecks", the food is a bit more southern than Midwest/German, and so on.
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Old 08-16-2020, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Boilermaker Territory
26,404 posts, read 46,561,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dodeca View Post
That twang is what linguists call the "Hoosier Apex", a bulge of southernisms that cover the lower Wabash River valley from about Clinton southward. I grew up in the center of the Apex, and all of these descriptions fit - much of the way of speaking comes a little more from the throat; listen to Patrece Dayton on WTHI, or to local commercials there. Warsh, Mondee, Tuesdee, Wednesdee; cricks (and even a few southern "runs"), car accidents are "wrecks", the food is a bit more southern than Midwest/German, and so on.
However, there are significant exceptions to this as you approach Jasper in Dubois County as well as Evansville where the Germanic influences are much stronger, similar to what you would find in areas of the central portion of the Midwest.
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Old 08-17-2020, 10:03 PM
 
Location: TN/NC
35,060 posts, read 31,278,237 times
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When I was there, I had some good friends from Seymour and points south. They would not have sounded out of place in my neck of the woods of Appalachia. Towns like Madison were basically an extension of home to me.

To me, anything south of Seymour of so is just an extension of Kentucky. Columbus is basically where you start dropping the accents and Indy is basically neutral. Northern IN gets the nasally stuff going on to this Tennessean.
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Old 08-18-2020, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,345,683 times
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Funny I should come across this thread today, because this afternoon I had a conversation with a gentleman from Indiana about camping, and he proceeded to tell me about the various 'pellows' he has tried and how he couldn't find an adequate 'pellow' for camping until he found just the right 'pellow', and basically proceeded to say 'pellow' about 12 times in 1.5 minutes.

The other feature he had was pronouncing certain 's' sounds a 'z'. Since he was talking abut the camping experiences he had with his wife, he was constantly saying 'uz', as in, "The pellows we tried for camping just weren't right for uz. so we tried some other pellows that seemed, for uz, to be better pellows."

I wish now I knew where in Indiana he came from because I had heard none of these pronunciations before and I have some experience in the SW Ohio/SE Indiana region so I am well aware of most of the features described in this thread.
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Old 08-19-2020, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
23,766 posts, read 29,045,903 times
Reputation: 37337
liquor is pronounced "sh-ey-ne"
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