U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Indiana > Indianapolis
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-06-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
905 posts, read 1,421,130 times
Reputation: 945

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
The entire time I lived in Indiana, not once did I ever hear a Hoosier refer to his or self or any other Hoosier as a Yankee. You just dont hear Hoosiers calling one another a Yankee. To me, a Yankee is somebody from North and East of Pennsylvania to the Northern most point in the State of Maine. .


Sorry, and no offense and nothing personal, but Yankee is not a title I could wear proudly, mainly because that's not who (or what) I am.

Yes I know that Hoosiers don't usually call themselves that, but by most common conventions it's not untrue, is it?

No pride of shame required, just basic facts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-06-2015, 11:21 AM
 
Location: 78745
3,208 posts, read 2,361,193 times
Reputation: 5565
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
It is true Midwesterners don't use the term Yankee. I don't know of in NY or New England it's used much, either. Always thought of it as kinda Southern.
I think in New England they are proud to be Yankees. Never been there but I think alot of the local businesses have the word Yankee in their name. New York City even has a baseball team called the Yankees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2015, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Fishers, IN
6,495 posts, read 10,987,826 times
Reputation: 4065
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I think in New England they are proud to be Yankees. Never been there but I think alot of the local businesses have the word Yankee in their name. New York City even has a baseball team called the Yankees.
New Englanders hate the Yankees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2015, 01:44 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 4,072,536 times
Reputation: 2607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivory Lee Spurlock View Post
I think in New England they are proud to be Yankees. Never been there but I think alot of the local businesses have the word Yankee in their name. New York City even has a baseball team called the Yankees.
Yankee definition throughout the world:

Outside of US: Meant to mean anybody from the USA. Usually used by Brits pejoratively or tongue-in-cheek
In the South: Usually means someone from outside of the South, OR from a state "not Southern enough" like Virginia or North Carolina
In the US outside of the South: Can mean someone from the Northeast, especially the NY or New England area
In Boston: Yankees suck!

Last edited by EddieOlSkool; 10-06-2015 at 02:42 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: IN
21,220 posts, read 36,848,955 times
Reputation: 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Are you referring to the KC accent as Southern? I've never heard it classified as such by anyone.

Ps, Yankee means a completely different thing based on context. Even the Mason Dixon line makes no difference as some Southerners believe that Virginians are Yankees. So in other words, pay no attention to the term. It just means "somebody who doesn't fit the Southern definition of a particular person".

It is true Midwesterners don't use the term Yankee. I don't know of in NY or New England it's used much, either. Always thought of it as kinda Southern.
US Dialect Maps



From: "Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-06-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,517 posts, read 9,380,848 times
Reputation: 5038
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
US Dialect Maps



From: "Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania"
I mostly agree with this map with the exception of Florida and Louisiana. Many Floridians, especially in the major cities do NOT have a southern accent, but many Floridians in rural central Florida do have a distinct drawl.

In Louisiana south of I-10 there are many self proclaimed Cajuns, and the Cajuns of Louisiana also have distinct accents. South of I-10 and north of I-10 really are two very different areas of Louisiana.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2015, 04:03 AM
 
1,523 posts, read 1,458,035 times
Reputation: 1542
Quote:
Originally Posted by grmasterb View Post
I can't recall hearing any Midwesterner refer to themselves as a yankee, but that's a term southerners liberally use to refer to people north of the Mason-Dixon. It is often said in a derogatory fashion. I can be defiant and wear the title proudly, because I'd rather be thought of as a yankee than a redneck.
Throughout South America and the Caribbean Americans are commonly referred to as Yankees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2015, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,367 posts, read 14,408,790 times
Reputation: 6019
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Yankee definition throughout the world:

Outside of US: Meant to mean anybody from the USA. Usually used by Brits pejoratively or tongue-in-cheek
In the South: Usually means someone from outside of the South, OR from a state "not Southern enough" like Virginia or North Carolina
In the US outside of the South: Can mean someone from the Northeast, especially the NY or New England area
In Boston: Yankees suck!
^^^^This madness about what a Yankee is should have stopped with this ^^^^^

There really is nothing more to talk about. People in Indiana don't call other people in Indiana Yankees. Southern Americans do. Foreigners do as well, but it means something else when they do as compared to what the southerners do. That is it. End of discussion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2015, 06:30 AM
 
1,523 posts, read 1,458,035 times
Reputation: 1542
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
The culture of each city is its own and I don't see carryover from either city culturally into the other.

Climate in Indy is on the same type as Minny but warmer. Climate in Louisville is in a different zone.

I don't think the cities share much in common. Indy is more like Cincy which I guess makes it sort of like Louisville. Minneapolis is not much similar to Indy. One thing they do share in common is that neither was ever a part of the South unlike Louisville. Some can make the case Louisville is as Southern as Baltimore but Indy is basically 0 degrees Southern even if it's not a fully Northern city. I just haven't ever heard of anyone there consider it Southern and I can't same the same for Louisville. In that way, Indy and Louisville are separate.
In my humble opinion, Indianapolis is nothing like Minneapolis. As far as weather is concern, Indianapolis is closer to Louisville's climate zone than Minneapolis:

Indianapolis: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/Images/150dpi/IN.jpg

Minneapolis/St. Paul: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/Images/150dpi/MN.jpg

Louisville: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/P.../150dpi/KY.jpg


Also Indianapolis is one of the most Protestant large cities in the United States vs. Minneapolis which is one of the most Catholic large cities in the United States:

Protestant: These Are The Most Protestant U.S. Cities

Catholic: These Are The Most Catholic U.S. Cities
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2015, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,517 posts, read 9,380,848 times
Reputation: 5038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyadic View Post
In my humble opinion, Indianapolis is nothing like Minneapolis. As far as weather is concern, Indianapolis is closer to Louisville's climate zone than Minneapolis:

Indianapolis: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/Images/150dpi/IN.jpg

Minneapolis/St. Paul: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/Images/150dpi/MN.jpg

Louisville: http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/P.../150dpi/KY.jpg


Also Indianapolis is one of the most Protestant large cities in the United States vs. Minneapolis which is one of the most Catholic large cities in the United States:

Protestant: These Are The Most Protestant U.S. Cities

Catholic: These Are The Most Catholic U.S. Cities
If you want to compare religions you may need to reevaluate. Louisville is dominated by Catholicism. I'd wager it's close, if not ahead of Minneapolis
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Indiana > Indianapolis
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top