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Old 01-29-2013, 05:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Bo View Post
The ISPs who server the majority of customers in the country are national. States have no regulatory authority over broadband access, so I see no political advantage to setting up ultra-high speed outposts in each state.

Google Fiber will have to suffice as the demonstration project for the time being, unless the Feds want to put some regulatory teeth into their recommendation.
It is much worse than that.

The central Washington counties of Chelan, Douglas and Grant have had fiber optic lines to their residents for well over a decade now. 1 gig service has been available in some of those counties for almost the same period of time.

From an economic point of view the advantage of high speed fiber for business development is not there. Face it, most business is the US is run by major corporations and their desire to innovate is limited at best. It has helped some small business, the co-op medical community, and public services in central Washington. Big corporations have been a no show.

We have the "best government money can buy" and the corporations have bought it all!! Funny, that the Obama Administration appointed former Governor Locke (Washington) to oversee fiber deployment in the US as Commerce Secretary. Governor Locke (owned by Verizon Corporation) fought the local counties when they wanted to deploy fiber to their residents. He insisted that ONLY CORPORATIONS could put up fiber networks to serve local residents.

The compromise between the "left-wing Republicans" in eastern Washington and the "right-wing Democratic governor" was that the counties would WHOLESALE, but not RETAIL fiber services to their residents. The counties do sell retail electricity, water, and sewer services to their residents. But Locke wanted to keep them from selling phone, internet, and cable services to their residents.

A business model that does not work without massive subsidies. The only way the three counties could do it was the massive electricity sales to western Washington to subsidize the fiber deployment. There are very few counties that get millions of dollars of revenue from the sale of surplus electricity in this country.

As long as our government is "owned" by the corporations in this country I suspect there will be little in the way of high speed internet deployment except on the terms dictated by Verizon and others. After all they pay our politicians re-election campaigns.

Sorry to be so negative, but watching it play out over a decade ago in central Washington made me realize that innovation in this country is pretty much all talk and no action.
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX
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The government's interest in this is purely economic. They couldn't care less if you have access to high speed Internet service.

What they want is a critical mass of people using it that can no longer live comfortably without it, so they can start taxing it.

The federal government shouldn't be involved with the growth of the Internet, unless it has a specific strategic importance for defense purposes. Market forces will determine growth. If you try to force it, all you'll end up doing is wasting money, and the government's already doing far too much of that.
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Old 01-29-2013, 09:53 PM
 
1,446 posts, read 4,321,578 times
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Our system of government is designed for stability and maintaining the status quo. Big change (from government) only occurs when the public demand for it becomes overwhelming (to the extent it is politically unwise to oppose such change). That is just the system we have. Very politically stable, but difficult to change. Now, that does not mean that change can't come from private sector. However, that change can only be put forth when it becomes financially profitable to do so. So what is the solution? Either the public starts demanding 1 gigabyte internet service...which will not happen. Or the private sector and major corporations can find some way to make a big profit from providing affordable gigabyte service...also a tough nut to crack. I do not know how they could do either.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by swagger View Post

The federal government shouldn't be involved with the growth of the Internet, unless it has a specific strategic importance for defense purposes. Market forces will determine growth. If you try to force it, all you'll end up doing is wasting money, and the government's already doing far too much of that.
Neither should state government. IF the local government wants to provide fiber to its residents the STATE and FEDERAL governments should not be able to stop its deployment.

That is the problem. Verizon did NOT want to provide fiber to eastern Washington and then used its political influence to try keep the people from doing it through their local government.
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