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Old 06-08-2007, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,193 posts, read 25,893,498 times
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Thanks, Ronzou--great explanation!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronzou View Post
FiOS is fiber(fibre as british english would say) optic internet service offed by Verizon wireless in a few test markets, but growing.

Here where I live was one of the first to get it. And now they have Internet, voice, television, all on one little fiber optic cable.

The slowest speed is 5Mbps, but if you want to pay you can get up to 50Mbps.

However that's with current technology, fiber optics can handle speeds up to 2 Gbps right now, but with no technology to send it, fiber optic cables are laughing at us and our feeble technology. lol
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Old 06-08-2007, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Looking over your shoulder
31,304 posts, read 30,529,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronzou View Post
Wow I just checked their web site and it says the fastest residential DSL is 7 Mbps...

And since you made the "b" capitalized, I'm guessing you mean bytes?

100 Megabytes per second? Are you sure it's not Megabits? And it's still outrageously fast for DSL. Which... Can't hit those speeds.

If you have 100 MBps you have to have a T carrier or O carrier...

I guess I'm confused.

Because DSL is over copper, and since copper succumbs to interference quite easily (and it goes over telephone lines which doesn't help) Phoenix, must either have many repeaters/regenerators for the signal to keep it clean and strong, and it must be some magical DSL. (Okay I suppose if you had the right encoding method it could be possible to send it that way over DSL through long lines.)

I'm guess you're seeing 100 MBps because you're either directly connected to the DSL modem, or directly connected to the router/switch. That's not your DSL speeds.
Sorry I stand corrected it is 7Mbps, you are correct.

However I did take a speed typing class a few summers ago!
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Old 06-08-2007, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Mississippi
3,927 posts, read 8,273,872 times
Reputation: 11409
i guess i don't understand. I just got dsl and it shows speed of 100Mbps on each of my two computers in my office, I do have wireless and the laptop shows 50 Mbps when i am in the living room.

Are you saying that I do not have a correct speed of 100Mbps?
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Old 06-08-2007, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
3,717 posts, read 8,994,140 times
Reputation: 7347
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronzou View Post
That happens with cable since everyone shares the nice bandwidth bandwagon, it can bog down at times for some, but if they have nice equipment it shouldn't be too horrible.

My only problem with cable is, it's less secure than DSL.
Cable less secure than DSL?? Please elaborate on that thought.

DSL is also a shared connection, because at the big telephone company central office, thousands of very limited bandwidth copper pair connections (very old school technology here) from thousands of ADSL modems get combined together to connect to a DSLAM (digital subscriber line access multiplexer). The DSLAMs at a telco office typically have a 1Gig or 10Gig ethernet connection to a main internet backbone site to connect you to the web. DSL is notorious for speed limitations due to RF interference from adjacent copper pairs in the same copper pair cable. The more DSL users in the same copper pair cable, the more the speed slows down due to increased RF interference with each other.

Cable modems, riding on a shared local path, use a very high bandwidth hybrid fiber coax broadband network from the neighborhood back to the cable headend, connect directly into a CMTS (cable modem termination system) which functions like an ethernet switch that has 1G or 10G connections into the global high speed internet backbone. A cable modem fed by CMTS is not any more vulnerable to somebody hacking into your computer than if you have DSL modem at home connected to a phone company DSLAM.

FIOS is a lot more like the "shared" bandwidth of a cable company hybrid fiber coax network than an old school copper pair telephone DSL topology. Verizon's FIOS uses a DSLAM adapted by Alcatel-Lucent that is known as model 7340 GPON OLT (Gigabit passive optical network optical lightwave termination). The multiple lightwaves of the optical network fiber are "split" near the customer's house and each house has a fiber termination into an ONT (optical network termination) that provides an ethernet connection for data, up to four standard phone line connections and a coax connection for video.

I've worked both sides of the fence in telephone company and cable company networks for 30 years or so. High speed cable modem service connected to a well designed and well managed local cable system provide speed and performance that old school local telephone companies that are still drowning in 100 year old copper pair networks can only dream about. In my area where high speed cable modem service really is high speed and reliable, cable modems are in three times as many homes as DSL, even though DSL prices per month are sometimes half the price. That is really the answer to this issue, because people vote for performance and reliability by who they sign up for service with when there is a choice between service providers. True, DSL usually is cheaper, but it is usually much slower too due to the very old school copper pair limitations. You get what you pay for.
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Old 06-09-2007, 08:07 AM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,583 posts, read 50,712,715 times
Reputation: 13549
I work for Comcast high-speed internet.

I've also worked for BellSouth dial-up and DSL.

"Recycled" knows exactly what he is talking about.

By the way, Comcast gives free McAfee to its subscribers.
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Old 06-09-2007, 03:10 PM
 
2,218 posts, read 5,161,621 times
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Recycled

DSL travels over the telephone wires. It is interconnected with audio, and data. In order to pull those signals out someone would have to have the right kind of equipment to intercept the signals.

Ya dig? Like if you were calling someone, the only way to eavesdrop on them would be to connect with the telephone line or pick up another line.

Cable is all interconnected and goes down one "tube" to the company, so since it all picks up all the traffic, it could be much easier for it be picked up when it is traveling "down" the tube before it gets to where it goes.

And for future reference it's FiOS, not all caps.

I'll write up my old Data Comm professor and have him write me an essay for you.

Quote:
DSL

More Secure
- Uses dedicated bandwidth which can be considered more secure.

CABLE

Less Secure - Uses shared bandwidth that is considered less secure by some.
Cable vs DSL - Comparing The Two Most Common High Speed Internet Connections
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Old 06-09-2007, 03:11 PM
 
2,218 posts, read 5,161,621 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
By the way, Comcast gives free McAfee to its subscribers.
And that is suppose to be comforting?
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Old 06-09-2007, 03:23 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,583 posts, read 50,712,715 times
Reputation: 13549
From YOUR link:

"The Internet is never totally safe, and regardless of the type of connection you have to it you can be at risk. Cable and DSL connections tend to be a bit more likely to be targeted than dial up users due to their “always on” nature. Both of these services seem to be equally secure, however some would argue that the “shared” bandwidth of cable is inherently inferior to DSL. While this may have once been the case, it more than likely is no longer so.

Both connection types benefit from virus protection software and firewalls. With these in place, the user can be assured they have taken strong precautions against intruders and malicious software. Another common safety practice is to turn off the computer or sever the connection when the Internet is not in use."

What is exactly your deal today? I've never known you to be like this...
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Old 06-09-2007, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
3,717 posts, read 8,994,140 times
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I particularly liked the closing statement in the link that was posted by Ronzou, which perfectly sums up my earlier posting:

"With the above information, we can conclude that both DSL and Cable are good Internet connections, but if Cable Internet is available it would seem to be the superior choice."
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Old 06-09-2007, 04:54 PM
 
2,896 posts, read 6,306,610 times
Reputation: 5036
I think for the vast amount of web surfers both dsl and cable systems are secure enough. Those that are heavily dependent on the net to run their business will hopefully be sharp enough to invest in the proper security equipment just like those that own a brick and mortar. If some yeahoo wishes to invest in the time, equipment and effort to tap into my coaxial cable and be able to bypass my security features in place so they can read what I am typing into forums then LOL because it would be as thrilling as looking into my window while I'm watching the Discovery Channel. No my puters cannot become zombies either Anything I do not want compromised is on an offline computer and always will be.
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