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Old 06-12-2008, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Bettendorf, IA
449 posts, read 1,260,889 times
Reputation: 210

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Sioux City does have a negative reputation, but I am sure there are many areas that are probably nice. On the other hand, with Sioux Falls only 80 miles north I would just go ahead and live there.
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Old 06-13-2008, 01:09 PM
 
1 posts, read 6,068 times
Reputation: 19
As a ten-year resident of Sioux City, I'd like to add my thoughts to this forum. First, a little background. I grew up in Wisconsin and went to college there, too. I attended graduate school in Texas. I am employed in education and have worked in Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, New York, and Iowa. I have lived in towns of 4,000 and urban areas of over 1,000,000. My views of Sioux City are partly shaped by my experiences in other parts of the country.

I live in the Morningside area. My experience suggests that the residents are friendly and helpful, but tend to be reserved and private. In other words, they won't necessarily make the first move to introduce themselves, but they will be welcoming to you if you introduce yourself.

Home prices in established, older neighborhoods are cheaper than almost every other part of the country I've lived in. Property taxes are also lower than other communities of equal size. If you plan to buy with an eye towards appreciation, don't expect a home in Sioux City to increase in price at the rates seen in other parts of the country.

Geographically, Sioux City is located in the Loess Hills, an area of steeply cut hills bordering the east bank of the Missouri River. This is actually one of the more attractive areas of the state's Western region. There are many opportunities for hunting and fishing, hiking and biking. Winters tend to be cold and long, with hot, humid summers. It's also quite windy. At this time, agriculture is booming, with high prices for corn and beans and farm land is expensive. Even a farmer with only a couple of hundred acres may be worth, at least on paper, over a million dollars. On the other hand, it is likely he also holds a considerable amount of debt.

Sioux City has two liberal arts colleges and one technical college. Morningside College is losely affiliated with the United Methodist Church and has about 1,200 full time students. Briar Cliff University was founded by the Franciscan sisters, and is a Roman Catholic school, but has many non-Catholic students and professors. It's about the same size as Morningside. According to U.S. News and World Report and other published rankings, Morningside is rated above Briar Cliff, but I think you could get a fine education from either school. Western Iowa Tech offers traditional liberal arts classes, but has a primary focus in professional training, especially in the trades. All three schools offer numberous artistic and cultural events for the public, and some of these have been truly international in scope, including presentations by Pultizer and Nobel prize winners. That said, I would not call Sioux City a college town. Most, but not all, of the residents seem to be focused on their families and not too interested in the larger world of ideas.

Politically, Sioux City is about 60% Republican, 30% Democrat, and 10% Independent. Residents tend to object to spending tax money for public works, and are suspicious of spending money on quality of life projects. However, business and city leaders seem more enlightened on this issue and are continuing to devote money to enhance the city's look and feel. Compared to when I first arrived, there is increased commitment to making Sioux City an attractive place to live. Retail shopping, dinning, and entertainment opportunities continue to grow, and with the addition of the Tyson Events Center and restored Orpheum Theatre, one can enjoy top-notch musical and theatrical entertainments. The stockyards are gone and have been replaced by commerial and retail sites. Two large hosptials and a variety of clinics make Sioux City a destination spot for health care.

Who should move to Sioux City?

1.) If you are married and are being offered a white-collar job in industry, commerce, education, or healthcare, and want to raise a family, in a conservative, relatively low-cost, low-crime community, Sioux City's a good choice. If you'll be making $75,000 a year or more, you'll be part of the elite. Someone making over $100,000 can live like royalty with his own McMansion, two-acres of land, and short drive to the golf course.

2.) If you are single, well-educated, and over thirty, be cautious. You will find it very hard to find others like yourself. Most of the attractive, educated young adults in Sioux City are married, raising children, and either going to church or golfing.

3.) If you crave a progressive, liberal-minded political or social climate, stay away. You'll find Sioux City, and Western Iowa as a whole, absolutely insufferable. This part of the state is represented in Congress by Steve King. If you follow politics, you'll know who this man is and who'll know the interests he represents. You've been warned.

4.) People interested in working in the arts will find numberous opportunities to practice their craft -- without being paid. In general, if a child growing up in Sioux City demonstrates ability in the arts, or strong creative or imaginative abilities, he or she leaves as soon as possible and doesn't look back.

5.) If you are in your twenties, like to work in retail or service professions, there are plenty of jobs for you. However, without advanced training and education, you'll probably want to leave Sioux City by your thirties; otherwise, you'll be doomed to making a low wage for the rest of your life.

6.) If you have specialized training in the trades (construction, electrical work, HVAC, etc.) you'll probably be able to build a career here. Openings for unskilled labor are plentiful, too.

So that's my take.
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Old 03-24-2009, 03:55 PM
 
2 posts, read 10,758 times
Reputation: 14
All cities have their pros and cons, however, Sioux City’s pros outweigh its cons. Sure, Sioux City may be a river town, but that doesn’t mean it is a bad place to live. There are many different activities, events, and businesses, etc. that are inviting. Sioux City contains two private colleges as well as two junior colleges with good reputations that are great for any budget. In fact, the Morningside College Woman’s Basketball team has just won the National Championship with a 38-0 season. Sioux City also has a great mall with many stores and is continuing to develop more areas of shopping, restaurants, and fun. It is also conveniently located between Omaha and Sioux Falls for easy travel. Sioux City hosts many large events at the Tyson Events Center including concerts that bring in many professional artists, National Tournaments, Musketeer hockey games, and Bandits football games. There are nearly 300 restaurants and 50 bars that are all within a 15 mile radius so you never have to travel very far for good food and a great time. There are also a little over twenty golf courses within a 30 mile radius. Sioux City hosts Harley Nights and Saturday in the Park during the summer, which are great entertainment that brings in people from all over, so you will never run out of things to do. Sioux City is a wonderful place to grow up, raise a family, and grow old in.
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Old 03-24-2009, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Lincoln
35 posts, read 160,519 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SiouxlandChamber View Post
All cities have their pros and cons, however, Sioux City’s pros outweigh its cons. Sure, Sioux City may be a river town, but that doesn’t mean it is a bad place to live. There are many different activities, events, and businesses, etc. that are inviting. Sioux City contains two private colleges as well as two junior colleges with good reputations that are great for any budget. In fact, the Morningside College Woman’s Basketball team has just won the National Championship with a 38-0 season. Sioux City also has a great mall with many stores and is continuing to develop more areas of shopping, restaurants, and fun. It is also conveniently located between Omaha and Sioux Falls for easy travel. Sioux City hosts many large events at the Tyson Events Center including concerts that bring in many professional artists, National Tournaments, Musketeer hockey games, and Bandits football games. There are nearly 300 restaurants and 50 bars that are all within a 15 mile radius so you never have to travel very far for good food and a great time. There are also a little over twenty golf courses within a 30 mile radius. Sioux City hosts Harley Nights and Saturday in the Park during the summer, which are great entertainment that brings in people from all over, so you will never run out of things to do. Sioux City is a wonderful place to grow up, raise a family, and grow old in.
Obviously you are getting paid to say these things If you grew up in Sioux city and never left, it's the greatest place in the world. If you moved out and experienced the rest of the country, you would never move back. I do miss certain things about Sioux City, But the Cons certainly outweigh the Pros.
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Old 03-24-2009, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Omaha, NE
1,119 posts, read 3,892,491 times
Reputation: 410
Default ..

I heard that the city leaders of Sioux City oppose gay unions because they are worried that they will have an influx of homosexuals in the city..

I guess they are trying to write up some proposal to ban gay unions to prevent that from occuring.
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Old 03-25-2009, 03:58 PM
 
2 posts, read 10,758 times
Reputation: 14
Actually I am not getting paid anything, I'm an intern here at the Chamber. I am also a soon to be graduate of Morningside College and have loved my time here in Sioux City for the past five years. I came to Sioux City by choice, I had the University of Northern Iowa in my back door and still decided to make the 4 hour move because I like this town.
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Old 03-25-2009, 05:33 PM
 
5,239 posts, read 7,042,936 times
Reputation: 11345
"It is also conveniently located between Omaha and Sioux Falls for easy travel"
that made me laugh.

"so you will never run out of things to do" thats a good one too.

just ignore the smell, the fact the public schools arent very good, and the crime is higher than the norm for a city its size. of course, there are worse places, but there are also better places.
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Old 04-08-2009, 06:53 PM
 
Location: CO Springs
25 posts, read 156,193 times
Reputation: 17
hmmm...I was born & raised in Sioux City....just having moved less than a year ago at 31 yrs old.

I have mixed feelings on it. I have roots there, my family still lives there, and its just a sense of being comfortable there, knowing everything, etc.

However, I have lived in Syracuse, NY and now live in Co Springs...and moving to Arkansas (not by choice lol) for my husbands job; this summer.
Sioux City IS a black hole as far as jobs & entertainment goes!!

Downtown is dead...yay they keep building more restaurants & shopping stores; but closing all the good paying companies that were once there! Since MCI, then Gateway closing, so many people have moved away (which was our reason). It's a sad deal that S.C cant seem to pick up & grow; make people want to move there....not just mexicans looking to work at IBP. That one poster was spot on, for every white person moving out is 3 (and I would say more like 5) mexicans moving in! And I dont need any replies about being racist, I am being HONEST! I mean there's Tijuana across the bridge....ok slightly exatterating I figure for living there for 30 yrs, I can joke about it right?

Anyhow, depending on what part of town you live (as in any city), it's safe. Avoid some west side, ALL of outskirts of downtown clear up to lower Northside. Leeds still seems pretty quite & safe...Morningside is patchy. I remember living on the westside as a kid & granted it was the 80s, it was safe and nice....now, not so much!

I think there are plenty of other places that would be better to live around there, but if that's where your gf is and she doesnt want to move, then ya just gotta outweigh the negatives with some kind of positives lol or balance it. (Believe me, Im trying to do that right now about Arkansas!)
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Old 04-08-2009, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Iowa
2,998 posts, read 3,294,446 times
Reputation: 3764
We need more raids on the packing plants, with deportations by the thousands and real border security. Starting with the criminals (check the tatoos to identify gangsters), vagrants, welfare leaches and bums, load them up and give them a one way trip to San Diego and dump them across the border in the real Tijuana. Passed thru South SC Neb a couple years ago for a visit to tobacco road, what a hole. When are people going to wake up and demand the government enforce our immigration laws and fund border security? It wouldn't take a quarter of what they spent on Iraq or the stimulus package to stop it. Thats where our national guard should be, down on the border, not 8000 miles away.

Even if you were born on US soil, that does not make you an American in my book. What a sick law, just because you sneak in here and have a kid, you and yours are now American citizens.
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:16 PM
 
1 posts, read 5,085 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rommeltyre View Post
As a ten-year resident of Sioux City, I'd like to add my thoughts to this forum. First, a little background. I grew up in Wisconsin and went to college there, too. I attended graduate school in Texas. I am employed in education and have worked in Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, New York, and Iowa. I have lived in towns of 4,000 and urban areas of over 1,000,000. My views of Sioux City are partly shaped by my experiences in other parts of the country.

I live in the Morningside area. My experience suggests that the residents are friendly and helpful, but tend to be reserved and private. In other words, they won't necessarily make the first move to introduce themselves, but they will be welcoming to you if you introduce yourself.

Home prices in established, older neighborhoods are cheaper than almost every other part of the country I've lived in. Property taxes are also lower than other communities of equal size. If you plan to buy with an eye towards appreciation, don't expect a home in Sioux City to increase in price at the rates seen in other parts of the country.

Geographically, Sioux City is located in the Loess Hills, an area of steeply cut hills bordering the east bank of the Missouri River. This is actually one of the more attractive areas of the state's Western region. There are many opportunities for hunting and fishing, hiking and biking. Winters tend to be cold and long, with hot, humid summers. It's also quite windy. At this time, agriculture is booming, with high prices for corn and beans and farm land is expensive. Even a farmer with only a couple of hundred acres may be worth, at least on paper, over a million dollars. On the other hand, it is likely he also holds a considerable amount of debt.

Sioux City has two liberal arts colleges and one technical college. Morningside College is losely affiliated with the United Methodist Church and has about 1,200 full time students. Briar Cliff University was founded by the Franciscan sisters, and is a Roman Catholic school, but has many non-Catholic students and professors. It's about the same size as Morningside. According to U.S. News and World Report and other published rankings, Morningside is rated above Briar Cliff, but I think you could get a fine education from either school. Western Iowa Tech offers traditional liberal arts classes, but has a primary focus in professional training, especially in the trades. All three schools offer numberous artistic and cultural events for the public, and some of these have been truly international in scope, including presentations by Pultizer and Nobel prize winners. That said, I would not call Sioux City a college town. Most, but not all, of the residents seem to be focused on their families and not too interested in the larger world of ideas.

Politically, Sioux City is about 60% Republican, 30% Democrat, and 10% Independent. Residents tend to object to spending tax money for public works, and are suspicious of spending money on quality of life projects. However, business and city leaders seem more enlightened on this issue and are continuing to devote money to enhance the city's look and feel. Compared to when I first arrived, there is increased commitment to making Sioux City an attractive place to live. Retail shopping, dinning, and entertainment opportunities continue to grow, and with the addition of the Tyson Events Center and restored Orpheum Theatre, one can enjoy top-notch musical and theatrical entertainments. The stockyards are gone and have been replaced by commerial and retail sites. Two large hosptials and a variety of clinics make Sioux City a destination spot for health care.

Who should move to Sioux City?

1.) If you are married and are being offered a white-collar job in industry, commerce, education, or healthcare, and want to raise a family, in a conservative, relatively low-cost, low-crime community, Sioux City's a good choice. If you'll be making $75,000 a year or more, you'll be part of the elite. Someone making over $100,000 can live like royalty with his own McMansion, two-acres of land, and short drive to the golf course.

2.) If you are single, well-educated, and over thirty, be cautious. You will find it very hard to find others like yourself. Most of the attractive, educated young adults in Sioux City are married, raising children, and either going to church or golfing.

3.) If you crave a progressive, liberal-minded political or social climate, stay away. You'll find Sioux City, and Western Iowa as a whole, absolutely insufferable. This part of the state is represented in Congress by Steve King. If you follow politics, you'll know who this man is and who'll know the interests he represents. You've been warned.

4.) People interested in working in the arts will find numberous opportunities to practice their craft -- without being paid. In general, if a child growing up in Sioux City demonstrates ability in the arts, or strong creative or imaginative abilities, he or she leaves as soon as possible and doesn't look back.

5.) If you are in your twenties, like to work in retail or service professions, there are plenty of jobs for you. However, without advanced training and education, you'll probably want to leave Sioux City by your thirties; otherwise, you'll be doomed to making a low wage for the rest of your life.

6.) If you have specialized training in the trades (construction, electrical work, HVAC, etc.) you'll probably be able to build a career here. Openings for unskilled labor are plentiful, too.

So that's my take.
I realize a year has passed since this post was published, but I found it so helpful that I hope you can shed a bit more light on a question related to my specific circumstances. There is a possibility of moving to SC with an assistant professorship at Briar Cliff U. I am married but will certainly make well below the $75,000 you mention (I mean well below, at least $30,000 less). My spouse is a school teacher, and as I understand it, school teachers are not exactly privileged in the job market there. We are also not at all conservative, not in the political sense, and lean rather on the liberal side of the bar (without tilting it much, if that makes sense). That is, we are by no means activists, but also do not fit in one bit with the conservative circle. I suppose my question has to do with your personal take on it. That is, would you recommend SC to someone like me, based solely on what I've shared (which may sum it up sufficiently anyway). I'll get to the point: are there any places/cities/towns around SC that would offer, perhaps, a bit more hope with relation to housing/living/more "open-minded" cultural areas and to job opportunities for middle- and high-school teachers, and for a married couple (no children) who are "progessive" in an ideological sense? This all may sound a bit odd, but I really would love your opinion. Thanks so much.
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